Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

331 hits

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Storage jar, Shigaraki ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Storage jar, Shigaraki ware. by unknown

    A large storage jar in the characteristic Shigaraki form. Produced with the coil and throw technique, as can be seen on the right side profile of the piece. Typical rough Shigaraki clay with bits of feldspathic rock in it, which fused in the kiln to create the smooth white bits of "glass" in the the surface of the piece. The surface shows a slight gloss, the result of "natural glaze" from the firing, as wood ash from the kiln fire would combine with silica in the clay of the piece to form a silicate compound, a natural glass.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with wisteria design, Imari-type Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with wisteria design, Imari-type Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with underglaze cobalt decoration, wisteria design. Imari-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B67P7)

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with bird design, Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with bird design, Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with bird design painted in underglaze cobalt. Kakiemon-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P37)

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics:  Ewer, view 2, Oribe-ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Ewer, view 2, Oribe-ware. by unknown

    Stoneware with white and copper-green glazes, underglaze iron brushwork. - This image shows the opposite side of the vessel shown in image ecasia000366. It is an Oribe-ware ewer, showing the characteristic contrasting elements of Oribe-wares - white glazed areas with underglaze iron brushwork, often geometric patterns based on motifs from nature, contrasted with the freely poured patterns of copper green glaze. -- The image presented in ecasia000366 [enter that i.d. as a keyword search to view the image easily] was photographed in an Art Institute exhibit, "East Asian Ceramics, Then and Now," summer, 2005. It was placed in such a manner that it could be viewed from one side only [no reference to the MOMA Duchamp...]. The view presented here, ecasia000943, was photographed in a different Art Institute exhibit, "The Practice of Tea from the Edo Period to Today," on view during the spring and early summer, 2007. The vessel was placed in a case that allowed the viewing of both sides of the vessel in the second exhibit, permitting this second view, which provides an interesting look at the different nature of the design patterns on the two sides of the spout. On one side, the pattern is entirely the geometricized pattern of the hexagonal motif, perhaps derived from the abstraction of a flower form. On the other side of the spout is a combination of simplified, naturalistic flower motives and geometric abstractions of that form (the five lobed set of dots set around a central dot) and a pattern of straight linear strokes that may be an abstraction of the pattern formed by a fence. All of that activity is combined, of course, with the richness of contrast of created pattern / poured glaze, discussed in reference to image ecasia000366. -- One other point of interest to note in comparing the two views is the different position of the lid in the two views and the very different sense of patterning created by the different positions. -- Coll. Art Institute of Chicago (Gift of Robert Allerton, 1959.5) -- [Note also the difference in the color rendering between the two views, showing dramatically and unfortunately the difficulty of achieving accurate color representation in situations such as these, where the lighting in artificial and over which the photographer has no control. Both images have been edited somewhat to adjust the color balance in the image, but they remain different from one another and it is probably true that neither image is a truly accurate representation of the color of the actual object. This will be compounded by the fact that very few computer monitors are calibrated the same way, meaning that, even if the online images were completely true in color representation, it is likely that they would appear different on every monitor used to view them. Hence, in discussing images viewed online, one must be very careful and somewhat skeptical in discussing color; it is rarely accurate.]

  • Thumbnail for Woman in Twilight, front view
    Woman in Twilight, front view by unknown

    This print and five following are from a series of 21 night scenes published by Nishinomiya Y?saku of the Hasegawa publishing house between 1910 and 1920. They are fine examples of Shin-hanga “New Printmaking,†a movement reviving the studio/workshop methodology of earlier ukiyo-e. All the works are darkly inked, indicating night settings, and feature bokashi techniques to create atmospheric effects. Like most of the others, this print shows a traditional subject—a woman of the entertainment world walking to an assignment—with a subtle reference to Hiroshige in the firewatcher’s ladder and bell in the distance.

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 2
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 2 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 3
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 3 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 14
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 14 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 13
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 13 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 19
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 19 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 7
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 7 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for Fan painting - Calligraphy with wisteria and peony
    Fan painting - Calligraphy with wisteria and peony by Unknown

    Wisteria and peony, with two blocks of calligraphy in a very small regular script to right and left. To the right are eight uneven lines followed by a seal; to the left are twelve lines varying from over twenty characters to six or seven in the shorter lines. Following this is a humble statement about the quality of the signature. The juxtaposition of the two spring flowers-wisteria at top and the peony at bottom-is unusual, and the meaning may lie hidden in the inscriptions. Neither artist nor calligrapher has been identified, and this may be intentional, especially if the artist/writer were a woman. Women in traditional culture were supposed to be self-effacing. Nevertheless, the fan is very nicely painted, both in terms of the composition and the technique. The "boneless" technique uses colored washes and no line and is used to effect here. Several other fans in the collection are also done in this manner.

  • Thumbnail for Mughal miniature painting - Man with White Beard and white Plumed Hat
    Mughal miniature painting - Man with White Beard and white Plumed Hat by Unknown

    Paint on ivory, 4-3/4 (L) x 3 (W) inches. Portrait of a prince wearing an elaborate turban of blue, brown, red and green with a floral design and white plum in front; brown fur is wrapped around his neck and hanging down on his cranberry garment which is covered with jewelry; four corners of the ivory have a floral motif while the portrait is enclosed in a oval wavy grey background.

  • Thumbnail for Padmasambhava (Thangka)
    Padmasambhava (Thangka) by Unknown

    This is a colored pencil drawing representing a thangka form, 23-1/2 (L) x 18 (W) inches. The Indian guru Padmasambhava is shown in the top center. Below to his left is his patron, the 8th century Tibetan king Trisong Detsen who invited him to spread Buddhist Dharma in Tibet. To his lower right is the Khembo (abbot) Shay-Wa-Tsen, who mediated between Padmasambhava and the king. A pair of crossed thunderbolts (vajras) ae located in the center of the composition. The snowy Himalayas and a clear blue sky are shown behind them. This image is also very skillfully rendered by an artist with prior training in the making of thangka paintings.

  • Thumbnail for Manjushri
    Manjushri by Unknown

    Ground pigment on cloth, mounted on brocade.

  • Thumbnail for Shakyamuni Buddha and Attendants - Thangka
    Shakyamuni Buddha and Attendants - Thangka by Unknown

    38 (L) x 23-1/2 (W) inches. Ink and color on cloth. Shakyamuni, the Historical Buddha is seated in the center on a lotus throne. His blue and gold radiant halo is framed by billowing clouds and flanked by a landscape. He holds a bowl of peaches in his left hand with his right i the earth witness mudra and wears a red and yellow robe. Above him, left to right, are Lozang Kalzang (7th Dalai Lama), Bajradhara, Amitayus; Buddha Akshoba, three-faced Savavid and Rajapani. He is flanked by two Mahassiddas on asses above two sacred elephants. In front of the throne are two disciples and below is Jambhala, Mahasuvarna Vaishravana and Black Jambhala (the Three gods of wealth). On the reverse are eleven red ink mantric inscriptions: Om ah hum. Mounted as a scroll with red and yellow silk frames on dark blue silk with a faded red silk dust cover and plain silver scroll ends.

  • Thumbnail for Offering Pitcher with Feathers
    Offering Pitcher with Feathers by Unknown

    Pitcher: 4-3/8 (H) x 1-7/8 (dia); feather top: 14-1/2 (L) x 3-1/4 (W) inches. Brass vase-shaped Bumpa or offering pitcher with a flat lozenge design pierced overhanging rim and a high matched pierced foot with a long tapering spout. A long copper stopper fitted with peacock feathers and a grass filler sits into the top of the pitcher and functions as a sprinkler for the consecrated water.

  • Thumbnail for Tara
    Tara by Unknown

    26 inches high by 10.8 inches wide. Image of the Buddhist goddess Tara seated on a double lotus; traces of polychrome paint & furnished w/ elaborate earrings, necklace & bracelet of repousee copper; arrested termite damage most notably on hands and base; previous catalog number "484" on bottom of base.

  • Thumbnail for Linga and yoni - detail of linga
    Linga and yoni - detail of linga by Unknown

    The linga and yoni represent the male and female sex reunited. The linga represents the divine phallus of Shiva and stands erect from the yoni. Stone, possibly marble.

  • Thumbnail for Round Ga’u
    Round Ga’u by Unknown

    4-1/8 (L) x 3 (W) inches. Round silver G'au or reliquary box with beaded rim and scrolling leaf filigree design on the lid with a single coral bead in the middle. The back has a removable base plate made of copper. The cover fitted on one side with a long looped ring and a pointed bead on the other.

  • Thumbnail for Letter Seal
    Letter Seal by Unknown

    2 (L) x 1/2 (Dia.) inches. Conical iron seal with a rattle inside and a lotus flower finial with a hole in it for a cord. Reticulated and engraved floral design, the vase with calligraphic design.

  • Thumbnail for Dasavataras, Visnu's ten incarnations - one of set of ten
  • Thumbnail for Siling Poba (Man's Drinking Bowl)
    Siling Poba (Man's Drinking Bowl) by Unknown

    2-1/8 (H) x 4-3/4 (Dia.) inches. Silver -lined wood burl man's drinking cup, with silver repousse floral capped foot with Eight Chinese Taoist Immortal symbols.

  • Thumbnail for Sitting Buddha
    Sitting Buddha

    This is a bronze Buddhist statue that shows a traditional aspect of Korea. Pusan, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Traditional Korean seesaw
    Traditional Korean seesaw

    This is a traditional seesaw where a board is placed on a mount below (usually a bundle of hay or straw). The people, instead of sitting, stand, and time it so that they jump up and down, making the other person go higher every time.