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  • Thumbnail for Chinese Ming Style Vase  - view 1
    Chinese Ming Style Vase - view 1

    7" h. Baluster form, very finely painted in brilliant underglazed-blue from the lip down, a band of ruyi heads with hanging jewel pendants, on the bottom of the neck a band of stiff overlapping leaves followed by a narrow band of diamond diaper alternating with four Buddhist emblems, the Wheel of the Law, conch shell, umbrella and vase, followed by a band of pendant three prong spear heads on the shoulder, two chilong standing at the top of a cliff with a twisted tree trunk above and behind them with rock formations, on the tall splayed foot a band of formal lotus pod lappets, stippling and mottling simulating "heaped and piled" effect, surface with "orange peel" effect, seal characters of Yongzheng and of the period.

  • Thumbnail for Don Quixote Plate
    Don Quixote Plate

    Depicts Don Quixote, lance in hand, "Mimbrino's Helmet" (a barber's bowl) on his head, astride Rosinante, and led by Sancho Panza. Floral sprigs in rim touched in gold. Outer foliate border.

  • Thumbnail for Wine Pot
    Wine Pot

    Of bundled bamboo form with flat cover and knob; decorated on the biscuit in famille jaune and famille verte enamels with "leopard skin" pattern.

  • Thumbnail for Bowl
    Bowl by Pierre Charles L'Enfant

    Of rectangular form with notched corners and circular base; decorated in underglaze blue, polychrome enamels, and gold, with cell-diaper border and husk chain at the rim, narrow bands on the base, central winged figure on opposite sides holding a knotted ribbon below which is suspended an eagle emblem, floral sprays on the alternating sides, "Fitzhugh" border on the interior rim together with a cell-diaper band in the center framing a single floral spray.

  • Thumbnail for Two-handled Vase
    Two-handled Vase

    Painted on each side with a petal shaped panel showing a mythical beast, the sides with birds on riverbanks and the neck with flowering plants, all between a pair of ear-shaped handles. Famile Verte pattern.

  • Thumbnail for Plate
    Plate

    Painted in grisaille, sepia, flesh-tones and gilt with the well-known scene of a gypsy woman reading the palm of a gentleman in a plumed hat as he reclines beside his horse within strap-work borders.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Tomb Candle Holders - view 1
    Chinese Tomb Candle Holders - view 1

    7" h. Paneled hu-formed stem with two degenerated animal head handles, molded in relief with floral sprays divided by bow-form raised and molded vertical lines raised on a high tapered base molded in relief with a frieze of stylized lotus petals, supported by five simple feet, surmounted by a hexagonal drip pan, on top there is an inverted scalloped tip collar surmounted by a tapered lip, minutely crazed greenish-beige glaze carelessly applied

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (2 view 2)
    Chinese Carved Gourd with Literary Scenes (2 view 2)

    1 1/2"h x 1 3/4"l (including base). Side view of finely carved gourd showing scenes from literature and opera.

  • Thumbnail for Carved Nuts with Literary Scenes - top view
    Carved Nuts with Literary Scenes - top view

    1 1/2""h x 1 3/4""l (including base). Finely carved sampan with moveable windows and doors set on a peach stone stand carved with raised flowers on an inverted chevron ground.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Tomb Candle Holders - view 2
    Chinese Tomb Candle Holders - view 2

    7" h. Paneled hu-formed stem with two degenerated animal head handles, molded in relief with floral sprays divided by bow-form raised and molded vertical lines raised on a high tapered base molded in relief with a frieze of stylized lotus petals, supported by five simple feet, surmounted by a hexagonal drip pan, on top there is an inverted scalloped tip collar surmounted by a tapered lip, minutely crazed greenish-beige glaze carelessly applied

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Junyao Bowl - bottom view
    Chinese Junyao Bowl - bottom view

    6 3/4" w. Campunulate form with slightly inverted rim, carved with two tiers of overlapping petals just above the foot on the exterior and freely carved floral scrolls in the interior of the bowl, the unglazed base has a shallow narrow foot ring, a blue glaze on the exterior and interior terminating to a mushroom color on the rim, an incised quarter moon on the base. Song Dynasty or later.

  • Thumbnail for Carved Bone Figure of Buddhist Guardian (back)
    Carved Bone Figure of Buddhist Guardian (back)

    Guardian figure shown from the rear, highlighting his military uniform and the sway of his stance. Made of bone, approximately 6 inches in height. Back view.

  • Thumbnail for Stoneware Cup - top view
    Stoneware Cup - top view

    2" average height. One of set of 3 cups, campanualate with slightly thickened rims and solid straight sided foot-rings, yellowish glassy and finely crazed glaze, grey body.

  • Thumbnail for Yueyao Stoneware Cup (profile)
    Yueyao Stoneware Cup (profile)

    2"h x 4"w. bottom view of small bowl with white glaze over buff body.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Carved Nuts with Literary Scenes (1 view 3)
    Chinese Carved Nuts with Literary Scenes (1 view 3)

    1 1/2" h x 1 3/4" l (including base). Side view of finely carved gourd showing scenes from literature and opera.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze Incised Belt Hook with inlay - detail
    Bronze Incised Belt Hook with inlay - detail

    Detail of remains of gold inlay in bronze belt hook.

  • Thumbnail for Stoneware Cup - profile view
    Stoneware Cup - profile view

    2" average height. One of 3 cups, campanualate with slightly thickened rims and solid straight sided foot-rings, yellowish glassy and finely crazed glaze, grey body.

  • Thumbnail for Funerary Vases (detail 2)
    Funerary Vases (detail 2)

    Detail of neck of funerary vessel. This unusual green glaze jar belongs to a particular type of funerary vessel made during the Three Kingdoms and Western Jin dynasties. Called a hunping (spirit jar), it has a long tapered body topped by a configuration of architectural elements and animals. In this example, figures circle the jar as other creatures swarm up the neck of the container.

  • Thumbnail for Teapot and Sugar Bowl
    Teapot and Sugar Bowl

    Drum-shaped teapot with crossed handles, leaf and berry terminals, and flat cover, bell shaped sugar bowl on a pedestal foot with crossed handles and domed cover, both with a strawberry knob; decorated with gold accents and crisscrossed parallel lines in thick blue enamel. (copied from silver examples pattern perhaps imitates trellis work)

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's skirt - detail
    Chinese woman's skirt - detail

    Green ground satin with multi-colored satin stitch silk thread embroidery of floral designs. Length: 82 cm. Although the coat is not an elaborate example, the embroidery is finely executed and the piece is in decent condition. Its very nice to have this garment intact, to be able to see the embroidery panels on the sleeves, which are often removed and used in the West as decorative wall panels. As for the skirt, the embroidery is finely executed but obviously not as meticulous as earlier Qing examples. Still, as securely datable garments, these are good indicators of the quality of traditional clothing of their day. That they were made for a foreigner is also interesting, as they reflect the vogue of fashion conscious ladies of that time for Asian art (which was being avidly collected in the West).

  • Thumbnail for Rite of the Great Compassion Repentance, with Notation
    Rite of the Great Compassion Repentance, with Notation

    Woodblock print, accordion-folded book; ink on paper. The ritual text of the Dabei chanyi hejie is itself is a pared down version of longer eleventh century manual for the great compassion repentance (titled, Qianshouyan dabei xinzhou xingfa, or "Rite [for Recitation] of the Dharani of Great Compassion of Thousand Armed and Eyed [Guanyin]," which can be found in Taisho daizokyo, vol. 46, T no. 1950). The original 11th century manual was authored by Siming Zhili (960-1038), one of the most influential Tiantai masters of the Northern Song period. The rite of the "great compassion repentance" has been enormously popular among Chinese Buddhists throughout the later imperial period (and not just Tiantai circles), with Zhili's manual serving as the principal guide to its performance. (Actually, this is also the origin of the Soto-shu's Kannon senbo, which comes out of Song China and is based on Zhili's text). Precisely when the shortened version of the rite -- i.e., the abridged rite reflected in the Dabei chanyi hejie -- actually took shape is not entirely clear, but it appears to have been used widely in the late Ming and Qing Dynasties, if not earlier. A number of printings of the Dabei chanyi hejie were apparently done in the 19th century (above information courtesy of Prof. Daniel Stevenson, University of Kansas, a specialist in Chinese Buddhism).

  • Thumbnail for Rite of the Great Compassion Repentance, with Notation
    Rite of the Great Compassion Repentance, with Notation

    Woodblock print, accordion-folded book; ink on paper. The ritual text of the Dabei chanyi hejie is itself is a pared down version of longer eleventh century manual for the great compassion repentance (titled, Qianshouyan dabei xinzhou xingfa, or "Rite [for Recitation] of the Dharani of Great Compassion of Thousand Armed and Eyed [Guanyin]," which can be found in Taisho daizokyo, vol. 46, T no. 1950). The original 11th century manual was authored by Siming Zhili (960-1038), one of the most influential Tiantai masters of the Northern Song period. The rite of the "great compassion repentance" has been enormously popular among Chinese Buddhists throughout the later imperial period (and not just Tiantai circles), with Zhili's manual serving as the principal guide to its performance. (Actually, this is also the origin of the Soto-shu's Kannon senbo, which comes out of Song China and is based on Zhili's text). Precisely when the shortened version of the rite -- i.e., the abridged rite reflected in the Dabei chanyi hejie -- actually took shape is not entirely clear, but it appears to have been used widely in the late Ming and Qing Dynasties, if not earlier. A number of printings of the Dabei chanyi hejie were apparently done in the 19th century (above information courtesy of Prof. Daniel Stevenson, University of Kansas, a specialist in Chinese Buddhism).

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ichimatsu Doll in Blue Kimono - face detail
    Japanese Ichimatsu Doll in Blue Kimono - face detail

    Ichimatsu doll, 22†with human hair, glass eyes, and working wooden fan and joined limbs. Named after Sanogawa Ichimatsu, an 18th c. Kabuki actor who specialized in female roles, Ichimatsu dolls are an Edo (Tokyo) invention. They portray little Japanese girls and boys in their holiday silk kimonos and are sometimes commissioned by the rich as portraits of their children. The dolls are display objects, not toys, and are usually kept in a glass box. They can range in size from 5†to 30†and are especially valuable if triple jointed. A subcategory of Ichimatsu Dolls that is of particular interest to Berea College is the torei-ningyo or Friendship Doll. These are Ichimatsu dolls have their origins in the attempt by the Reverend Sidney L. Gulick to amend bad feelings in Japan created by the Exclusion Act of 1924, which denied immigration and citizenship rights to persons of Chinese and Japanese descent. Gulick, who knew Francis Hutchins, hit on the idea of sending “blue-eyed dolls†as ambassadors of friendship. He managed to have 12,379 sent to Japan by 1927. The dolls were very favorably received and in return, 58 large Ichimatsu dolls were commissioned from such noted doll-makers as Hirata Goyo to represent the Imperial Household, the 6 largest cities, the individual prefectures, and the Japanese territories of Korea, Taiwan, and Manchuria. Each Friendship Doll was furnished with accessories, including lacquered furniture, tea sets, lanterns, folding screens, parasols, geta (raised wood sandals), and other personal ornaments, not to mention passports. The friendship dolls sailed to America in 1927. They toured the country and were then given to museums, libraries and other appropriate institutions that had children’s departments, with Miss Japan going to the Smithsonian Institution. (See Sidney L. Gulick, Dolls of Friendship: The Story of a Goodwill Project between the Children of America and Japan, Friendship Press, NY: 1927.) Many Friendship Dolls are now lost or forgotten, though efforts are being made to find the original group and some have even returned to Japan for restoration, arriving there to great local fanfare. In addition, Gulick’s grandson, Sidney L. Gulick III, continues to send dolls to Japan.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stages of the Tokaido
    53 Stages of the Tokaido by Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1855)

    Shirasuga, the Slope at Shiomi (Shirasuga, Shiomizaka zu) from the series Fifty-three Stages of the Tokaido Road (Tôkaidô gojûsan tsugi no uchi). This famous set of color woodblock prints appeared between 1833-34 and was published by Hôeidô and Senkakudô. Good condition.

  • Thumbnail for Black Japanese Helmet
    Black Japanese Helmet

    Helmet, black with gold 5-petal flower emblem, red underside. Japanese helmet of the type called jingasa, 12x 13 inches. Lacquered wood in excellent condition. During the Tokugawa period, a key means of social control were the great parades of warlords and their retainers going to and from the capital city of Edo, where they were required to spend every other year in attendance upon the Shogun. These “alternate attendance†(sankin kotai) processions, up to 4,000 strong in the case of the Maeda clan, had the effect of keeping the common people of Japan in awe of the warriors. “Alternate attendance†thus helped keep the peace, something that the Shogunate was so good at doing that there was no war for the 250 years of the Tokugawa reign. As the Pax Tokugawa continued on and on, however, the Shogun and his retainers became warriors who never went to war. The actual ability to fight thus became secondary to maintaining a fearsome image. As Herman Ooms puts it in his essay in Edo: Art in Japan, 1615-1868, form became norm, and image, more important than reality. It is just this process that transformed armor into Art. Armor in the late Tokugawa Period is all about image, a point quite clear in this helmet. The helmet purports to be covered with silk that parts to reveal rough steel plates held together with large, round rivets. In fact, the helmet is made entirely of a thin, light wood covered with a layer of lacquer and gilt.