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3808 hits

  • Thumbnail for Plate  with Black Butterfly Pattern
    Plate with Black Butterfly Pattern

    Decorated in "Hundred Butterfly" or "Black Butterfly" pattern this plate is decorated in polychrome enamels and gold, with continuous border of sixty butterflies interrupted by four panels, each containing two butterflies and a bee, all framed within narrow bands on the rim, central design of two large butterflies encircled by twenty smaller ones and several other flying insects.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Jianyao Teabowl (bottom)
    Chinese Jianyao Teabowl (bottom)

    2 " h x 4 1/4" w. The conical bowl on a narrow shallow foot ring is covered with a chocolate glaze on the exterior and interior of the reddish brown stoneware except for the base and just above the foot ring.

  • Thumbnail for Gold Lacquer Inro with Ivory Netsuke - front view
    Gold Lacquer Inro with Ivory Netsuke - front view

    H: 6 cm W: 5 cm L: 1.8 cm D: of netsuke 4.2 cm. Gold lacquer inro with overlay design in mother of pearl and shakudo. Design: flying cranes. Ivory netsuke: turtle and toad; signed inside. Cover: Korin

  • Thumbnail for Plate
    Plate

    Decorated in underglaze blue, with alternating panels of peaches and auspicious symbols separated by beaded pendants on barned rim, central scene of a bird and grasshopper amongst rocks and flowering foliage within an octafoil medallion reserved on a key scroll and cell diaper ground, roundels alternating with straight lines on the reserve.

  • Thumbnail for Oval Platter
    Oval Platter by Fitzhugh pattern

    Exuberant green Fitzhugh border and 4 panels. Center design is shield with initials in front of sepia eagle with spread wings.

  • Thumbnail for Sixteen Sword Guards - Japanese term, tsuba
    Sixteen Sword Guards - Japanese term, tsuba

    Sixteen individual sword guards made of various materials.

  • Thumbnail for Monteith Bowl
    Monteith Bowl

    Of circular form with eight notches on the rim; decorated with an underglaze blue ground on the exterior; with floral lappets and peonies surrounding the eight reserved cartouches containing vessels and vases. On the inside there are eight Buddhist emblems.

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: text for men lighting pipe
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: text for men lighting pipe

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: two friends greeting eachother
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: two friends greeting eachother

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Black Japanese Helmet - underside view
    Black Japanese Helmet - underside view

    H: 13-1/4", W: 12" Helmet, black with gold 5-petal flower emblem, red underside. Japanese helmet of the type called jingasa, Tokugawa Period. Lacquered wood in excellent condition. During the Tokugawa period, a key means of social control were the great parades of warlords and their retainers going to and from the capital city of Edo, where they were required to spend every other year in attendance upon the Shogun. These “alternate attendance†(sankin kotai) processions, up to 4,000 strong in the case of the Maeda clan, had the effect of keeping the common people of Japan in awe of the warriors. “Alternate attendance†thus helped keep the peace, something that the Shogunate was so good at doing that there was no war for the 250 years of the Tokugawa reign. As the Pax Tokugawa continued on and on, however, the Shogun and his retainers became warriors who never went to war. The actual ability to fight thus became secondary to maintaining a fearsome image. As Herman Ooms puts it in his essay in Edo: Art in Japan, 1615-1868, form became norm, and image, more important than reality. It is just this process that transformed armor into Art. Armor in the late Tokugawa Period is all about image, a point quite clear in this helmet. The helmet purports to be covered with silk that parts to reveal rough steel plates held together with large, round rivets. In fact, the helmet is made entirely of a thin, light wood covered with a layer of lacquer and gilt.

  • Thumbnail for Page showing the Kyoto Hachiman Shrine, from the book, Wakoku meisho kagami - A Mirror of Famous Sites of Japan
    Page showing the Kyoto Hachiman Shrine, from the book, Wakoku meisho kagami - A Mirror of Famous Sites of Japan by Hishikawa Moronobu (died 1694)

    Double page woodblock printed book illustration; ink and light colors (applied by hand) on paper. This small page from an important, VERY rare early printed book, by the founding father of Ukiyo-e printmaking, is a precursor to the types of books that in the 18th century became produced in great numbers and were in widespread circulation then. During the 18th century, travel (or armchair travels) became exceedingly popular. The description of the place, written from right to left above the illustration, shows how integral pictures were to printed texts. The placement of the text above the illustration was an innovation of Moronobu and is characteristic of his books.

  • Thumbnail for Sword Guard (Tsuba) with Octopus and Ape - reverse side
    Sword Guard (Tsuba) with Octopus and Ape - reverse side

    Sword guard (tsuba), signed Yoshinaga(?),and dated 1862. Curatorial files identify the work as in the Garyuken line of Nara Variation. Copper and brass. Excellent condition. This sword guard was part of a group of 20 in a three-layered lacquered wooden box. All are of high quality and this one was singled out only because of its large size and unusual decoration. The guard bears the image of an octopus attacking a monkey. The image is typical of late Tokugawa Period in being showy, with copper and brass highly polished and looking like gold. It is also a bit odd and unsettling. The sword guard has the quality that Gerald Figal calls “monstrous†(Civilization and Monsters, Spirits of Modernity in Meiji Japan, Durham and Loudon, 1999). As Figal points out, “monstrous†is a fair description, not only of Art in 19th c. Japan, but also of this chaotic, disturbed time. No less than the paintings or prints of Hokusai or the helmet discussed above, then, this sword guard captures well the spirit of its time.

  • Thumbnail for Dao Coin with Circular Top
    Dao Coin with Circular Top

    Dao are early coins made in the shape of weapons, datable to the 1st c BCE to the 1st century CE. Material: cast metal alloy. 7.5 cm in total length; handle is 1.2 cm in width and the circular top is 2.6 cm in width. This is an example of early coinage that was issued while the economy evolved from a barter to an monetary economy. Bronze knives and bronze spades were common barter items in ancient China, but a bit awkward or hazardous to carry around to trade. Some of China's first coins were made to look like a knife or like a stylized spade, so that people would think of them as money, however they were too thin and fragile to be used for anything but money. The knife coin and the spade coin developed in different areas of China about the same time. This knife coin is called the "Ming" after the city where it was made (not the dynasty that was much later).

  • Thumbnail for Chinese table - dragon detail
    Chinese table - dragon detail by Designed by Carl F. Kupfer, and made by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute.

    Size: Height: 78.5 cm, length of the table-top: 118.5 cm, width of the table top: 71 cm. Material: Teakwood, Black Lacquer, and Mother of Pearl. The table was designed by Carl F. Kupfer. It was made of teakwood, black lacquer, and mother of pearl by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute (a mission station) in 1899. No nails were used in its construction. The table is similar to one located in the Baldwin Wallace College Chapel. Both tables have the bishops’ likenesses and Chinese motifs. In the central rectangle of this table, there are figures representing the Board of Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church; at the corners of the rectangle, four small squares contain the likenesses of S. L. Baldwin, W. T. Smith, A. B. Leonard, and A. L. Palmer.

  • Thumbnail for Pomegranates
    Pomegranates by Ito Wako (born 1945)

    Edition: 13/150. Mezzotint; ink and colors on paper.

  • Thumbnail for Potter Under Tiled Roof
    Potter Under Tiled Roof by Mori Yoshitoshi (1898-1992)

    Kappazuri (stencil printing); ink and colors on paper. Mori, who began as a textile designer, turned to stencil printing in 1954 after receiving encouragement from Yanagi Sôetsu. He straddled the worlds of the artist and the artisan-craftsman until 1962, when Serizawa Keisuke criticized Mori in a well-known debate for abandoning the crafts movement. Mori thereafter devoted himself to the art of kappazuri-e. His subjects included kabuki scenes, craftsmen, festivals, and figures from traditional stories. He printed on both colored and unprinted grounds. The Ross Museum print illustrates an example from a series of seven prints from 1973 depicting artisans. Though untitled, this design is known as "Potter under Tiled Roof." It is signed "Y. Mori," dated "73," and numbered 18/70. Arguably the best design from the group, the strength of the potter is admirably portrayed as he works the clay to form the vase. The simplicity of the roof and the boldness of the figure add a sense of monumentality to the design.

  • Thumbnail for Stone and Sand
    Stone and Sand by Hagiwara Hideo (born 1913)

    Edition: 9/30. Woodblock print; ink, colors, and silver on paper. Hideo Hagiwara was born in Kofu City, Yamanishi Prefecture. Between 1921 and 1929 he lived in Korea and Manchuria. He studied at the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, where he graduated at the Oil Painting Section in 1938. While still there he attended Un'ichi Hiratsuka's extracurricular woodblock printing course, and in the same year he became quality controller at the Takamizawa Woodblock Print Company. He was conscripted into the army in 1943. In 1945 he had lost his house, his atelier and nearly all his early works. Around 1950 he had sufficiently recovered to start painting again. At the same time he started making Sosaku hanga (creative prints), both figurative and abstract subjects. He is known as a constant innovator and he is generally considered one of the best post-WWII Sosaku hanga artists.

  • Thumbnail for Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto" - detail from left side
    Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto" - detail from left side

    Detail of scene from right screen of an original pair of 6-fold screens; 67" H. x 142" W. (6 panels)The type originated in the Momoyama period, when they were presented to visiting warlords, to take home as a memento of their visit to Kyoto. This particular example is relatively late for the type, but a good example. The iconography for this particular type of screen pairs is set, and this example follows the program for the right hand screen of the original pair, depicting the colorful floats of the Gion Matsuri (Kyoto’s “signature†festival) in LR, and various Kyoto landmarks, like the Kiyomizudera (a temple with a veranda supported on high pilings) in the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's skirt - whole
    Chinese woman's skirt - whole

    Green ground satin with multi-colored satin stitch silk thread embroidery of floral designs. Length: 82 cm. Although the coat is not an elaborate example, the embroidery is finely executed and the piece is in decent condition. Its very nice to have this garment intact, to be able to see the embroidery panels on the sleeves, which are often removed and used in the West as decorative wall panels. As for the skirt, the embroidery is finely executed but obviously not as meticulous as earlier Qing examples. Still, as securely datable garments, these are good indicators of the quality of traditional clothing of their day. That they were made for a foreigner is also interesting, as they reflect the vogue of fashion conscious ladies of that time for Asian art (which was being avidly collected in the West).

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Kashmiri Illustrated manuscript about Vishnu (and his Krishna incarnation) (illustration)
    Kashmiri Illustrated manuscript about Vishnu (and his Krishna incarnation) (illustration)

    Book manuscript; ink, colors, and gold on paper. Ohio State University Professor Susan Huntington notes that this is probably a 19th century piece. She notes that it is actually a very nice example with later paintings and manuscripts just now gaining favor compared with older materials.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of a Man -  detail of inscription
    Portrait of a Man - detail of inscription

    Possibly an ancestor portrait of a Qing-type figure. Male has graying beard, wears traditional Qing cap.Bright blue, fur-lined robe decorated with cranes on phoenixes. Undergarment has 4-clawed dragons, flaming pearl, over stylized rocks and waves. Very cursive character faintly visible here. Further inscription on base of throne is written sideways.

  • Thumbnail for Butsudan - Private Buddhist altarpiece
    Butsudan - Private Buddhist altarpiece

    11.5 x 5 inches overall; figure 7.75"; base 3.75". Made of black lacquer. This kind of Buddhist family altar may have contained memorial tablets for dead ancestors, and/or images of various deities, depending on the sect of Buddhism. Historically, it was maintained by a family in the home, in addition to a Shinto household shrine. Label notes that the butsudan was a gift of S. Ogata.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of a Man
    Portrait of a Man

    Possibly an ancestor portrait of a Qing type figure. Male has graying beard, wears traditional Qing cap. Bright blue, fur-lined robe decorated with cranes on phoenixes. Undergarment has 4-clawed dragons, flaming pearl, over stylized rocks and waves.