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  • Thumbnail for Two-handled Vase
    Two-handled Vase

    Painted on each side with a petal shaped panel showing a mythical beast, the sides with birds on riverbanks and the neck with flowering plants, all between a pair of ear-shaped handles. Famile Verte pattern.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze Chinese Mirror - reverse side
    Bronze Chinese Mirror - reverse side

    H: 3/4" W: 5-1/8". Mirror, bronze disc with light green and yellow patina. Obverse: polished. Reverse: decorative outer edge, inscribed inner edge, center boss raised with hole to attach mirror to support; square container of light wood with sliding lid.

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: Boatwoman with fish
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: Boatwoman with fish

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (edging detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (edging detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Sword Guard (Tsuba) with Octopus and Ape - reverse side
    Sword Guard (Tsuba) with Octopus and Ape - reverse side

    Sword guard (tsuba), signed Yoshinaga(?),and dated 1862. Curatorial files identify the work as in the Garyuken line of Nara Variation. Copper and brass. Excellent condition. This sword guard was part of a group of 20 in a three-layered lacquered wooden box. All are of high quality and this one was singled out only because of its large size and unusual decoration. The guard bears the image of an octopus attacking a monkey. The image is typical of late Tokugawa Period in being showy, with copper and brass highly polished and looking like gold. It is also a bit odd and unsettling. The sword guard has the quality that Gerald Figal calls “monstrous†(Civilization and Monsters, Spirits of Modernity in Meiji Japan, Durham and Loudon, 1999). As Figal points out, “monstrous†is a fair description, not only of Art in 19th c. Japan, but also of this chaotic, disturbed time. No less than the paintings or prints of Hokusai or the helmet discussed above, then, this sword guard captures well the spirit of its time.

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Page from an unidentified book showing a Heian era court lady and child on a veranda
    Page from an unidentified book showing a Heian era court lady and child on a veranda

    Double page woodblock printed book illustration; ink and colors on paper. This book illustrates an unidentified courtly tale of the Heian era, possibly the Tale of Genji, in a conservative, Tosa-school style. It makes an interesting contrast to the illustration of the Tale of Genji, in a more contemporary Ukiyo-e style with bolder colors, by Utagawa Kunisada.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons - detail
    Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons - detail

    Earthenware with brightly colored glazes in blue, green, and yellow. Three are round (one of these broken); two have cloud-shaped borders (one is broken). Provenance: Peking

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - detail
    Chinese woman's coat - detail

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for Gold Lacquer Inro with Ivory Netsuke - back view
    Gold Lacquer Inro with Ivory Netsuke - back view

    H: 6 cm W: 5 cm L: 1.8 cm D: of netsuke 4.2 cm Gold lacquer inro with overlay design in mother of pearl and shakudo Design: flying cranes. Ivory netsuke: turtle and toad; signed inside. Cover: Korin

  • Thumbnail for Pomegranates
    Pomegranates by Ito Wako (born 1945)

    Edition: 13/150. Mezzotint; ink and colors on paper.

  • Thumbnail for Ladder
    Ladder by Kim Lim (1936-1997)

    Intaglio print on paper. British sculptor and printmaker of Chinese birth. She grew up in Singapore and at the age of 18 decided to go to London to study at Saint Martin’s School of Art (1954–6) where she took a particular interest in wood-carving; she then transferred to the Slade School of Art, where she concentrated on printmaking, graduating in 1960. Whilst at college she often travelled through Asia and Europe en route back to Singapore, with Indian and South-East Asian sculpture and spirituality making a great impact on her work. While Lim always acknowledged a debt to the work of Constantin Brancusi in her simplification and abstraction of forms, it is in her concern for the specific qualties of materials, as in her use of charred wood to create contrast, that the influence of Eastern spirituality and concepts of balance can be seen. In 1960 she married the painter and sculptor William Turnbull, settling in London but continuing to travel widely. In the 1960s and 1970s her sculptures were mainly carved from wood, using forms inspired by basic rhythmic forms and structures, with each element forming a balanced whole. Her prints from this time also explore these modulations, as in the etchings Set of Eight (1975; see 1995 exh. cat., pp. 24 and 28), which consist of simple patterns of blocks and lines.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - building 1
    Mura - 'Village' - building 1 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - figures working 2
    Mura - 'Village' - figures working 2 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjir_. Grad. 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village'  - figures working 1
    Mura - 'Village' - figures working 1 by Inagaki Nenjir? (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese table (top surface)
    Chinese table (top surface) by Designed by Carl F. Kupfer, and made by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute.

    Size: Height: 78.5 cm, length of the table-top: 118.5 cm, width of the table top: 71 cm. Material: Teakwood, Black Lacquer, and Mother of Pearl. The table was designed by Carl F. Kupfer. It was made of teakwood, black lacquer, and mother of pearl by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute (a mission station) in 1899. No nails were used in its construction. The table is similar to one located in the Baldwin Wallace College Chapel. Both tables have the bishops’ likenesses and Chinese motifs. In the central rectangle of this table, there are figures representing the Board of Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church; at the corners of the rectangle, four small squares contain the likenesses of S. L. Baldwin, W. T. Smith, A. B. Leonard, and A. L. Palmer.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - plants 1
    Mura - 'Village' - plants 1 by Inagaki Nenjir? (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto"- view from left
    Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto"- view from left

    View from left side of paper on wood frame screen. Right screen of an original pair of 6-fold screens; 67" H. x 142" W. (6 panels) The type originated in the Momoyama period, when they were presented to visiting warlords, to take home as a memento of their visit to Kyoto. This particular example is relatively late for the type, but a good example. The iconography for this particular type of screen pairs is set, and this example follows the program for the right hand screen of the original pair, depicting the colorful floats of the Gion Matsuri (Kyoto’s “signature†festival) in LR, and various Kyoto landmarks, like the Kiyomizudera (a temple with a verandah supported on high pilings) in the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Plum-Blossom Viewing at Kameido Gardens
    Plum-Blossom Viewing at Kameido Gardens by Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1855)

    One of a series of views of Tokyo famous places (Edo in feudal times). Hiroshige signature is at left. In upper right is series cartouche, Edo Meisho, which identifies the print as coming from one of several series of prints by Hiroshige that were published with this title; one such series of 45 prints was published in 1853. Titles say, beginning at left :Edo Famous Places (Edo Meisho), Kameido, Plum View Tea House, Hiroshige. (Yamanka). Image depicts a multitude of people in various acts outside:walking, talking, sitting on large benches and carrying trays. Image size 8-1/8 (L) x 13-1/8 (W).

  • Thumbnail for Jarlet
    Jarlet

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, 1998.5.9, height 4" x dia.2". By the time the Sawankhalok district kilns stopped production, at least 500 kilns had been built into the banks of the Menam Yom (river), at Tukatha, Ban Pa Yang, and Ban Koh Noi all sited across the river from the ancient capital of Si Satchanalai. Potters working at Ban Koh Noi produced glazed ceramics for local use (called Mon ware by the local peoples) by the thirteenth or fourteenth century and exported goods from all of the sites by the end of the fourteenth century. Numerous jarlets of this type were produced at the various kilns at Si Satchanalai in central Thailand. The glaze is a brown iron glaze and the body typical of Si Satchanalai wares, a buff color with dark impurities. Jarlets of this type were also produced by the Chinese, but the Thai jarlets generally are more finely finished with a carefully carved-recessed base. Excavations of burials in the Philippines revealed a ceremonial placement of imported vessels around the body Thai jarlets were placed around the head, Chinese plates were inverted over the pubic area, saucers were placed beneath the hands, and local wares were arranged away from the body. What this arrangement meant will never be known, but it does suggest that a specific symbolic significance was assigned to the various vessels.

  • Thumbnail for Underglaze bowl - bottom view
    Underglaze bowl - bottom view

    From Sawankhalok. Stoneware, H: 3" x Dia. 7 5/8". Underglaze-iron painting on bowls from Sawankhalok and Sukhothai in Thailand, and in the northern kilns of Vietnam, clearly derives from Chinese Guangdong ceramics, particularly those produced in the kilns of Xicun. A popular motif on both the Sukhothai and the Sawankhalok bowls and plates was a solar whorl or wheel, possibly an allusion to that symbol as it is used in Buddhism, to denote the law or teachings of the Buddha. This solar whorl is visible on the interior base of this bowl. The leaves that are painted on the cavetto of the bowl have been added recently. Thus, although the bowl dates to the period of export, it was tarted up in recent times to increase its value. This is not an uncommon practice for resale in Southeast Asia. Aside from the varnished surface of the piece, it was also possible to ascertain the modern addition by applying a small amount of acetone with a q-tip; the painting lifts off easily. The black impurities typical of Sawankhalok clay are visible on the base of this bowl, the white visible on the base is slip, rather than glaze that was painted on prior to firing. Southeast Asian ceramics are never glazed on the bottom, as opposed to Chinese ceramics, which often have a glazed base.

  • Thumbnail for Korean Meiping (plum shaped) vase with celadon glaze
    Korean Meiping (plum shaped) vase with celadon glaze

    Size: Height: 27 ½ cm. A letter from the donor is preserved and states that “The choicest article in the box (of items he sent to the library) is a celadon vase of the rare old Korean pottery, for hundreds of years only to be had from desecration of the royal tombs in which this ware had been buried with the bodies of departed dignitaries who had died prior to some five hundred years ago. This particular piece came from a royal tomb looted by Japanese.â€

  • Thumbnail for Womb Mandala
    Womb Mandala

    49 x 39 inches. The Womb Mandala (J.: Taizokai Mandara) is paired with the Diamond Mandala [J: Kongokai Mandara]. Together the two are known as the Mandalas of the Two Worlds [J: Ryokai Mandara], referring in Esoteric Buddhism of the Shingon Sect to the phenomenal [J: Taizokai] and the transcentdental [J: Kongokai] manifestations of the Cosmic, Universal Buddha[J: Dainichi Nyorai] that is encountered in Esoteric Buddhism. The Cosmic Buddha, Dainichi Nyorai, occupies the center of a red lotus blossom at the heart of the mandala; Buddhas of the four directions and four bodhisattvas associated with each one radiate from him on each of 8 petals. Wrathful manifestations [J: myoo] are below the lotus, and around it are arranged the hundreds of other figures.

  • Thumbnail for The Daimond Mandala- detail of panel with vajra motif
    The Daimond Mandala- detail of panel with vajra motif

    The Diamond Mandala (Kongokai Mandara; Skt.: Garbhadhatu Mandala) is paired with the Womb Mandala (Taizokai Mandara; Skt.: Vajradhatu Mandala). Together, the two forms are known as the Ryokai Mandara (or "Mandalas of the Two Worlds"), referring in Esoteric Buddhism of the Shingon sect to the phenomenal (Taizokai) and the transcendental (Kongokai) manifestations of Dainichi Nyorai (the version of the Cosmic, Universal Buddha Roshana [Skt. Vairocana] that is encountered in Esoteric Buddhism). The other one of this pair is catalogued.