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  • Thumbnail for View of the Earth
    View of the Earth

    Colored ink and paint on paper, 12 3/4 inch circle with interior concentric circles of varying colors. Mandala-type image with central image made of tripartite grouping of images in a palatial setting.

  • Thumbnail for Ceremonial sword and sheath-full view
    Ceremonial sword and sheath-full view by Paiwan

    The ceremonial sword and sheath were important symbols of social status and male potency in traditional Paiwan culture in Taiwan. The sheath is decorated with human ancestral figures and a sacred mythological creature, the hundred-pace snake.

  • Thumbnail for Battle flag
    Battle flag

    Battle flag in the shape of a right triangle. Made of red cotton with a black cotton Chinese character in the center, which probably represents the name of the battalion.

  • Thumbnail for Cotton robe-front view
    Cotton robe-front view

    Robe made of Japanese cotton and old Japanese kimonos with complex embroidered decorations on the front and back. From Hokkaido.

  • Thumbnail for Ivory and wood sculpture of Bodhisattva
    Ivory and wood sculpture of Bodhisattva

    Ivory Guanyin with a teak stand in a glass case.

  • Thumbnail for The Married Rocks of Futami
    The Married Rocks of Futami

    Antique painting on silk.

  • Thumbnail for Musicians on Horseback (2 of 2) - profile view
    Musicians on Horseback (2 of 2) - profile view

    13 1/2 X 2 3/4 X 6 inches. Glazed pottery tomb figure of musician on horseback.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido - Yokkaichi, Station 44
    53 Stations of the Tokaido - Yokkaichi, Station 44 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. People walking over bridge with grass to the thriving market town and port facing the Ise Bay. Yokkaichi means 'market on the fourth day'. Hiroshige presents the city from a sharp angle from the left; the bridge was one of a series of narrow bridges built over the river and low land close to the seashore to allow access to the market.

  • Thumbnail for Hommonji Temple in Snow
    Hommonji Temple in Snow by Kawase Hasui (1883-1957)

    Color woodblock, 15 1/4 X 10 1/2 inches. Print by one of the leading artists of the Shin Hanga print movement. The depiction of the landscape from a sharp angle in this print reflects the influence of traditional Japanese woodblock prints in the Edo period. Published by S. Watanabe Color Print, with signature of Hasui and stamp in red in lower right corner.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of a Boxer Supporter (detail)
    Portrait of a Boxer Supporter (detail)

    28 1/8/" x 18 15/16". Ink and colors on paper. Detail of head of formal family portrait of Boxer supporter. Shows influence of Western photography on Chinese portraiture.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Kanagawa, Station 4
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Kanagawa, Station 4 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Hiroshige presents a nice ocean view of Kanagawa with travelers taking a break in a rustic tea house by the blue water.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Odawara, Station 10
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Odawara, Station 10 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Odawara was a post town facing Sagami Bay. It is said that travelers on the Tokaido often stayed in Odawara for the night to rest in order to prepare for climbing the deadly Hakone pass the next day.l

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Sanjo-ohashi, Station 55
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Sanjo-ohashi, Station 55 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Central bridge,busy with travelers and pilgrims, diminishing at vanishing point with grey mountains in the distance. Sanjo-ohashi Bridge in Kyoto was located on the Kamo River and one of the major landmarks in Kyoto. Hiroshige skillfully uses one point perspective to lead the eye of the viewer gradually to the other endof the bridge, past the rooftops of Kyoto to Higashiyama Mountain range in the far distance.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Seki, Station 48
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Seki, Station 48 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Seki means 'checkpoint', and checkpoints were set up at strategic locations by the Tokugawa government to control traveling, police the road and prevent any unlawful activities. Hiroshige illustrates the arrival of a high ranking official accompanied by his entourage at Seki.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes with Cranes - one from an album of six
    Landscapes with Cranes - one from an album of six by Lu Zhi (1496-1576) (attributed)

    This album of landscapes with cranes includes a seventh leaf giving an attribution to the Ming dynasty master painter Lu Zhi. The attribution is spurious. The landscapes are fairly well done, but at times, the cranes are awkwardly rendered. The subject is an auspicious one, and the album would have made a nice birthday present, wishing the recipient a long life. The images are pleasant, probably dates to the Qing dynasty. 10 1/2 x 12 inches. The album contains six leaves total.

  • Thumbnail for General Zhu Zhixi in His Garden - colophons and text
    General Zhu Zhixi in His Garden - colophons and text by Jiao Bingzhen (1689-1726)

    Colophons and text attached to the handscroll General Zhu Zhixi in His Garden. The inscription gives Jiao Bingzhen as the artist, though the painting is probably later in date. The painting depicts a scene from the biography of General Zhu Zhixi, president of the Board of War for the Kangxi Emperor of the Qing dynasty. A biography is appended. The scene shows the general in a library set into a garden, with servants nearby.To see the entire scroll, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of a Boxer Supporter
    Portrait of a Boxer Supporter

    28 1/8" x 18 15/16 inches, ink and colors on paper. Formal family portrait of a supporter of the Boxer rebellion. Signed 'Charles F. Gammon 1900'.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Goddess Figure
    Chinese Goddess Figure

    Blanc-de-chine porcelain 5 1/2 X 2 1/2 X 2 inches, with bluish tinge. Seated figure of deity, most likely Guanyin.

  • Thumbnail for Amitabha Dharani Sutra - frontispiece with illustration
    Amitabha Dharani Sutra - frontispiece with illustration

    On the fiftieth anniversary of his graduation, Charles R. Bennett ('07) gifted this woodblock-printed, illustrated Buddhist text to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Dating to the year 975, the Amitabha Sutra is probably the earliest printed object in the college's collection. Consider that the world's earliest dated printed book is the Buddhist Diamond Sutra of 868 (now in the British Library) and that the Gutenberg Bible hails from the mid-1400s. Mr. Bennett, who lived and worked in China for two decades after graduating, remarked that the sutra was recovered from a brick of a pagoda in the city of Hangzhou. Indeed , on September 25, 1924, the famous Leifeng ("Thunder Peak") Pagoda collapsed. Erected by a regional king, the Leifeng Pagoda stood on the southern bank of the scenic West Lake for nearly a millenium. In 2000-01, a team of excavators revealed an underground chamber filled with gilt silver and bronze sculptures along with artifacts of stone and jade. In addition, the excavation confirmed the presence of bricks with cylindrical cavities that once held printed sutras. Bowdoin's sutra, not quite 3 inches high but almost seven feet long, is currently mounted as a handscroll. Its condition attests to its age, but as we may still distinguish from right to left a dedication, an illustration, and a sutra text. The dedication tells us that the king, Wang Qianchu, commissioned 84,000 copies of this sutra to be placed in the pagoda in the 8th month of the year 975. The illustration shows two distinct moments. At right a worshipper kneels at an altar table placed before a holy triad comprised of a seated Buddhist deity and a pair of monks. At left, the deity appears to a beseeching worshipper. Radiant jewels hang from above, fragrant flowers rain down, and a splendid stupa is placed at the center, giving the scene a sacred air. Following the illustration, the text records a story of how Buddha once restored a crumbling pagoda. It seems likely that by placing many copies of this sutra in Leifeng Pagoda, the king could ensure the building's continued existence. From text drafted for a Bowdoin College Museum of Art newsletter by De-nin D. Lee. The entire scroll measures approximately 3" x 7'. Woodblock-printed, illustrated Buddhist text. To view the text that accompanies this illustration, click on related records below.

  • Thumbnail for Crane by Pine and Waterfall from Album of 11 Miniature Sketches)
    Crane by Pine and Waterfall from Album of 11 Miniature Sketches) by Jin Xiaqi

    These sketches depict animals in landscapes 1) crane by pine and waterfall 2) two horses by stream 3) ox-herder and two oxen crossing a stone bridge 4) dragon cavorting above a frothy sea 5) a pair of peacocks on a riverbank 6) a group of horses in a pasture 7) mandarin ducks in a pond 8) monkey clinging to a hillock 9) white goats on a hillside 10) a pair of white cranes near bamboo 11) three spotted deer, plantain, and rock. Each album leaf is 5 1/16 x 3 1/2 inches. Ink and colors on silk. To see another image from the album, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Landscape in the style of Mi Fu from Album of Eight Minature Landscapes
    Landscape in the style of Mi Fu from Album of Eight Minature Landscapes by Zhang Peidun (1772-1846)

    This album of landscapes demonstrates Zhang's ability to paint in a number of classic idioms, including the misty "Mi" family style, and the style of Ni Zan. The album could have functioned as an artist's sketchbook of compositions and styles, but it would have had value for collectors. A good representation of the orthodox styles available to artists of the late imperial period. 7 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches. Ink on paper. See related album leaf by clicking on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Landscape in the style of Ni Zan from an Album of Eight Miniature Landscapes
    Landscape in the style of Ni Zan from an Album of Eight Miniature Landscapes by Zhang Peidun (1772-1846)

    This album of landscapes demonstrates Zhang's ability to paint in a number of classic idioms, including the misty "Mi" family style, and the style of Ni Zan. The album could have functioned as an artist's sketchbook of compositions and styles, but it would have had value for collectors. A good representation of the orthodox styles available to artists of the late imperial period. 7 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches. Ink on paper.

  • Thumbnail for General Zhu Zhixi (1624-1666) in His Garden
    General Zhu Zhixi (1624-1666) in His Garden by Jiao Bingzhen (1689-1726)

    The inscription gives Jiao Bingzhen as the artist, though the painting is probably later in date. The painting depicts a scene from the biography of General Zhu Zhixi, president of the Board of War for the Kangxi Emperor of the Qing dynasty. A biography is appended. The scene shows the general in a library set into a garden, with servants nearby. 11 7/8 x 44 inches. Ink and colors on silk.

  • Thumbnail for Frontispiece to painting of One Hundred Boys
    Frontispiece to painting of One Hundred Boys by Gu Luo (1763-?)

    Frontispiece giving date and title to the painting of One Hundred Boys by Gu Luo. The painting employs the same pastel, bright palette for depicting an auspicious subject of 100 boys playing. This theme would have been functional as a gift for a newlywed couple. The image is delightful and humorous.11 15/16 x 88 15/16 inches. Ink and colors on silk. To see the entire scroll, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 6 (tea sets)
    Tea Room image 6 (tea sets) by Seiji Suzuki

    A traditional "mizuya" or preparation room sits apart from the tearoom. Typically, the most honored guest sits closest to the alcove, but our tea room is designed in a configuration known as geza-doko, which allows visitors to enjoy a full view during a demonstration. The first guest sits closest to the outer-most edge of the tea room.