Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

3808 hits

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 18
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 18 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for Painting of a branch of loquats (detail)
    Painting of a branch of loquats (detail) by Ch’i Pai-shih (Qi Baishi) (1863-1957)

    (Part of a set of four) Qi Baishi (1863-1957) is perhaps China’s most revered master of the twentieth century. These four paintings are representative of Qi’s floral, fruit and aquatic subjects. The cascading forms, bright colors and strong sense of abstract design in the compositions are characteristic of his style.

  • Thumbnail for Rubbing of stone engraving depiction of the poetess Xie Tao (detail)
    Rubbing of stone engraving depiction of the poetess Xie Tao (detail)

    Although of lesser quality, this depiction of Xie Tao is interesting because it is a rare (imaginary) portrayal of a woman writer. The text at the top of the scroll is her biography. Xie (768 – 831/32) was a noted courtesan/poetess who lied in Chengdu, Sichuan. In addition to her poetry she is famous for developing an ornamented paper to be used for writing out brief poems.

  • Thumbnail for Painting of a squash vine
    Painting of a squash vine by Ch’i Pai-shih (Qi Baishi) (1863-1957)

    (Part of a set of four) Qi Baishi (1863-1957) is perhaps China’s most revered master of the twentieth century. These four paintings are representative of Qi’s floral, fruit and aquatic subjects. The cascading forms, bright colors and strong sense of abstract design in the compositions are characteristic of his style.

  • Thumbnail for Tiger claw
    Tiger claw

    Mounted in gold filigree setting depicting a Naga or dragon. The records indicate that this is a piece of ""Royal Javanese"" jewelry. It is a very finely crafted work. The exquisitely delicate gold-work contrasts with the bold, organic simplicity of the tiger's claw to make a striking visual impression. Qing dynasty Chinese product, or a Javanese version of a Chinese piece done by a Chinese jeweler living in Java.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of platform shoes worn by Manchu women
    Pair of platform shoes worn by Manchu women

    Shoes for bound feet of Chinese women contrast with the “platform†shoes worn by Manchu women, who did not bind their feet. These platform shoes, it is said, enabled Manchu women to imitate the seductive sway of Chinese women with bound feet. The decoration on these shoes is appliqué, not embroidery.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (detail)
    Chinese feather fan with birds and flowers (detail)

    This fan displays a pair of peacocks and peonies and other flowers, which are common subjects in these types of fan. Although its condition is poor,it is a very interesting artifacts. The Chinese export of feather fans first appeared in Europe during the first quarter of the 19th century. They are usually made of goose feathers (occasionally with added peacock feathers on the top) mounted on sticks which can be made of a variety of materials, including ivory and bone. The frames of the fans are carved, showing the quality of their craftsmanship, with flowers and classical scripts, which could be either an imitation of Oracle bone characters or seal/clerical scripts. Originally these fans would have been very costly.

  • Thumbnail for Set of armor-side view front facing right
    Set of armor-side view front facing right

    Set of armor including helmet, chest armor, shoulder, thigh, and arm armor, and shirts. Very well made. From Kyushu. Only the helmet was photographed.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze vessel (handle detail)
    Bronze vessel (handle detail)

    In ancient Japan (prior to the Meiji era, 1868-1912), metalwork was solely for swords and Buddhist statues. During the Meiji era, a decree abolishing sword-wearing and the restoration of Shintoism, the original religion of Japan, as the national religion caused the making of metalwork to shift to objects for export and home consumption; the functions of objects and subject of decoration tended to be secular. This vase, designed with a style of Chinese bronze vessel, bears 8 different scenes on the entire body. There are four large panels, with subjects ranging from figurative to seascapes, on the main body of the vessel, and four small horizontal scenes, landscapes and seascapes are the subjects (possibly a display of the four seasons), on the bottom. The designs are done in relief. The borders of the panels are also ornamented with plant patterns, chrysanthemums and gingko tree leaves in particular common Japanese floral motif. A great deal of artistic appeal and distinctive styles are the trademark of Meiji metalwork.

  • Thumbnail for Pillow (used by ladies)
    Pillow (used by ladies)

    Cushion resting on a wooden base. This type of pillow can be seen in Japanese prints and paintings of the Edo era (1603-1868 AD), so it is identified as “Japanese,†which differed from Chinese pillows largely made of ceramics. It was used by ladies who rested on the back of their neck to avoid messing up their elaborate hairdos. The drawer at the bottom of the wooden base may have contained personal belongings, including jewelry at some point. Its condition is fine, but the colors of the cushion have faded (the design and pattern on the cushion remain visible).

  • Thumbnail for Le Billet Doux
    Le Billet Doux by Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960)

    Color woodblock print, 15-1/2 x 12". “The Love Letter†[le billet doux] depicts a Mongolian woman crouching and turning round to meet the viewer’s eye. This image is printed on gold-flecked paper, and uses silver and gold ink sparingly to produce a subtle richness. The round purse at her waist is embossed. Jacoulet was born in Paris, but from a very young age lived in Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze ding vessel (alternate view)
    Bronze ding vessel (alternate view)

    This is a standard example of the most popular and enduring bronze vessel shapes. It is an excellent example of mould casting. Normally, the design on the lid of an ancient bronze vessel matches that on the body of a vessel. Here, the decoration on the lid does not repeat that of the body; nor does the lid fit securely on the vessel. These two discrepancies indicate that this lid does not belong to this specific vessel. Bronze lids with similar three projecting prongs have been found in tombs in Sandong and Henan Provinces; the vessels they belong to are considered to date from the Eastern Zhou period (722-256 BC). The surface decoration of interlaced designs both the body and the lid are typical for this period.

  • Thumbnail for Lacquer collage - Coca Cola and children
    Lacquer collage - Coca Cola and children by Luo Weidong, born 1963, Luo Weiguo, born 1964 and Luo Weibing, born 1972

    Mixed media vertical image of four sleeping babies sporting Mao caps overlaid with the traditional red carp swimming upward toward a rising sun complete with Coca Cola logo.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese carving of a mouse eating a persimmon
    Japanese carving of a mouse eating a persimmon

    The bushy tail leads the viewer to suspect that it may be a squirrel. One of the inlaid eyes is missing. Apparently made for retail sale.

  • Thumbnail for Fishermen painting
    Fishermen painting

    15 1/8 X 6 3/4 watercolor and ink painting of fishermen by the shore.

  • Thumbnail for Textile
    Textile by Angkola or Toba Batak

    Cotton textile or ulos comprised of three panels with red and white bead trim on the sides. From the island of Sumatra.

  • Thumbnail for Hakone from Fifty-three Famous Places (Gojûsan tsugi meishozue)
    Hakone from Fifty-three Famous Places (Gojûsan tsugi meishozue) by Utagawa (Andô) Hiroshige

    Woodblock print. 13¾" x 9". Paper was issued in the Tokugawa Period (1615-1868) in standard sizes, most prints being in the oban format of 15 x10. The smaller size of this print thus indicates cutting. Condition good with some slight damage and staining in center of the print. Professor Mandancy’s letter identifies the work as one of the Fifty-three Stages of the Tokaidô (Tokaidô gojûsan no uchi), that is the set of 1833-34. Actually the print is from the 1855 set, as properly noted in her original list. The first step in making an Ukiyo-e woodblock print was an artist (eshi) painted a composition in ink on paper. The sketch (or later a copy) was pasted down on a plank of wood (usually cherry) and cut away to create the key or outline block. A separate person from the artist, called the cutter (hori), did the carving. A third person -- the rubber (suri) -- took the carved block and, placing it face up, moistened the printing surfaces by quickly brushing on water and glue. Color and ink were then applied by hand and pre-moistened paper placed onto the wet surface. The rubber then took the print by rubbing from behind with a baren (pad of rope covered by bamboo). It is usually presumed that the key block was used to make the patterns for the color blocks. In old views of Ukiyo-e, the key block, being closest to the sketch by the hand of the artist, was considered the most important. Authenticity, therefore, was mostly a matter of comparing lines in a questioned print to those in published, established, or otherwise accepted examples. If there was a match, the print was “genuine,†and often labeled as such on a tag on the back. The print of Hakone is, moreover, very useful for teaching how to look at lines in Ukiyo-e because those forming the border around the image show gaps and are thin, indicating that the key block was old and worn when the print was taken. The lines in Shinagawa are stronger, an important point in determining the work’s better condition.More interestingly, there is a worn area in the right hand corner of Hakone, where the printed line appears to have been scraped off and then drawn back in. Such repairs are common in Ukiyo-e and a much more obvious example is in the print of Shirasuka in the Union College Collection, by the same artist and from the same series. Shirasuka clearly has been repaired. For instance, there is a hole in its lower half of the print that has been filled in and colored to match the surrounding areas. In the lower right hand corner of Shirasuka, there is a place where the line has been obviously scraped off and then redrawn.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase (body detail)
    Ceramic vase (body detail)

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Gold painted glass tube
    Gold painted glass tube

    It is an interesting and good glass tube, although missing a lid/or stopper (or cord). The exterior of the tube is painted in gold with floral decoration. This should be considered a perfume bottle, and was called a “reclining bottle.†Some identical bottles were made in France, Germany, and Bohemia to hold rose or lavender perfume oils during the 2nd half of the 19th century. This object could have been brought to China by early Lutheran missionaries and families and mixed within the collections.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus shoe for bound feet (sole detail)
    Lotus shoe for bound feet (sole detail)

    This shoe has never been worn, as the sole is intact and clean and its heels also bear nice needlework. Although the colors and fabrics have either faded or worn out, the stitching is refined. The motifs are often associated with auspicious symbolism (fertility) in addition to its aesthetic quality. The custom of women's foot-binding has been documented before the 10th century in China, and was officially abolished in the Qing dynasty (1645-1911). However, Chinese women continued to accept this torment as a social norm. The foot-binding custom was not completely extinguished until the 1950s and 60s in China under enforcement from Christian missionaries and foreign military in the 1890s.

  • Thumbnail for Rhinoceros horn wine cup stand
    Rhinoceros horn wine cup stand

    Carved from a large rhinoceros horn. Imitation of a bronze Han Dynasty mirror. Two dragons decorate the surface.

  • Thumbnail for Bodhisattva Sculpture
    Bodhisattva Sculpture

    Carved wooden sculpture of the Bodhisattva Kuan Yin (Guanyin). Painted wood. The Bodhisattva wears a beaded necklace that crosses at navel and extends to shins. A third row of beads extends down between the legs. A circular medallion enclosing a diamond pattern is just above the knees on the central axis. Two sashes extend down on either side of the legs. The right hand exhibits an unusual mudra for an image in this style. The left hand holds a drooping flower bud. This is a finely crafted piece, and it is also a puzzle. This is carved in the so-called ""columnar"" style of the Northern Qi dynasty (late 6th century CE), but it cannot be that old. Wooden Buddhist sculpture of that time period is virtually non-existent except for a few fragments found in central Asia. Many surviving wooden Buddhist images date to the Song Dynasty, however they are rendered in a later, and more fluid, naturalistic style radically different from this image. Perhaps this piece is from a later provincial temple in which an archaizing style was deliberately adopted (as was commonly done in the painting tradition)? It could be some kind of modern forgery, but it is highly unlikely. If a modern forger wished to pass of such an image as a Qi dynasty piece he would be an utter fool to make it of wood.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus shoe for bound feet (toe detail)
    Lotus shoe for bound feet (toe detail)

    This shoe has never been worn, as the sole is intact and clean and its heels also bear nice needlework. Although the colors and fabrics have either faded or worn out, the stitching is refined. The motifs are often associated with auspicious symbolism (fertility) in addition to its aesthetic quality. The custom of women’s foot-binding has been documented before the 10th century in China, and was officially abolished in the Qing dynasty (1645-1911). However, Chinese women continued to accept this torment as a social norm. The foot-binding custom was not completely extinguished until the 1950s and 60s in China under enforcement from Christian missionaries and foreign military in the 1890s.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus shoe for bound feet
    Lotus shoe for bound feet

    This shoe has never been worn, as the sole is intact and clean and its heels also bear nice needlework. Although the colors and fabrics have either faded or worn out, the stitching is refined. The motifs are often associated with auspicious symbolism (fertility) in addition to its aesthetic quality. The custom of women’s foot-binding has been documented before the 10th century in China, and was officially abolished in the Qing dynasty (1645-1911). However, Chinese women continued to accept this torment as a social norm. The foot-binding custom was not completely extinguished until the 1950s and 60s in China under enforcement from Christian missionaries and foreign military in the 1890s.

  • Thumbnail for Wooden fan (side 1 bird detail)
    Wooden fan (side 1 bird detail)

    This fan has good detail and color quality, and is most likely inspired by a literary theme.The fan emerged in Japan by the 9th century AD. The Japanese have a long tradition of making wooden fans threaded together on the top of each rib. However, the size of this fan is large, and the format (circular when opened to its full extension) may be inspired by a type known as “big wheel fan,†attributed to Korea, during the Yi (Chosen) dynasty (1392-1910 AD). However, the brushwork, subject matter, and motifs of the paintings on the fans are Japanese. The size and weight of the fan might not have a practical function. The common motifs on Japanese wooden fans include stories from literature, such as the Tale of Genji.