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  • Thumbnail for Seoul street advertising
    Seoul street advertising

    This particular bit of advertising was for a nightclub where several of the employees would dress up as a traditional Chinese dragon or dogs. They would run up to people on the street and dance for them.

  • Thumbnail for Seafood market
    Seafood market

    Primarily along the shores of Korea, there are rows upon rows of various stands selling all assortments of seafood. Each customer and can handpick which fish they want to take home to eat.

  • Thumbnail for Korean food stand
    Korean food stand

    These kinds of food stands are located all over the streets of Seoul. They sell a variety of Korean food and are made on the spot. Unless you have adjusted to the food in Korea, wait a little before trying these items, but they are worth trying.

  • Thumbnail for Singapore's Chinatown
    Singapore's Chinatown

    Chinatown in Singapore. This was taken a few days before the Chinese New Year in February.

  • Thumbnail for Wet Market
    Wet Market

    The Wet Market is like a Farmer's Market. There are fish and fresh produce. Located in Chinatown, Singapore.

  • Thumbnail for Amida Buddha
    Amida Buddha

    Painted ink on paper image of the Pure Land Buddha Amida. May also be a representation of Amitayus, "The Buddha of Long Life" based on the iconography of the 'long life' symbol on the deity's robe. Purchased in the early 1980's in Taiwan.

  • Thumbnail for Hindu temple
    Hindu temple

    Looking inside the front door of the Hundu Temple.

  • Thumbnail for Yixing teapot
    Yixing teapot

    Partaially glazed earthenware teapot.

  • Thumbnail for Distant view of Mt. Asama from Urawa stationq
    Distant view of Mt. Asama from Urawa stationq by Eisen Keisai

    Keisai Eisen was born in Edo, the son of a calligraphy artist. He was apprenticed to Kikugawa Eizan and studied traditional painting before becoming a printmaker. Throughout his career, Eisen’s work was productive and varied. Book illustrations and prints were his first commissioned works. Early on, he achieved lasting fame for his bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), and both contributed to and edited the Ukiyo-e ruiko (History of Prints of the Floating World) one of the few surviving sources of information-rich material on printmaking art and artists in Japan. At times, he struck partnerships with other artists of his age, such as his collaboration with Hiroshige, which resulted in a series of landscape prints entitled The Sixty-nine Stations on the Kiso Highway. Eisen also released many surimono (privately issued prints), shunga (erotic prints), and some landscape pieces. In addition to his career as a printmaker, Eisen pursued other sources of income. A self-described hard-drinker who humbly titled his version of Japanese print history Mumeio zhuihitsu (Essays by a Nameless Old Man), Eisen was also the manager and proprietor of a brothel for a time. Today, however he is most famous for his portrayals of the beauties of old Japan. As a result of the success of Hiroshige’s “Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido, publishers commissioned many artists to do series in similar veins. Eisen both collaborated with Hiroshige and executed his own series of images from the Kisokaido (Great Western Highway).

  • Thumbnail for Bronze mirror stand and mirror
    Bronze mirror stand and mirror

    Cast in the form of a recumbent unicorn or qilin supporting a crescent shaped base for a mirror, this mythical beast carries its head turned to its left and has its legs folded beneath the equine body. In traditional Chinese mythology the predominant characteristic of the qilin is that of benevolence and kindness, offering an evocative addition to a court dressing table. The mirror, of a much earlier date, is cast with typical grape vine and lion decoration on the reverse, a subject frequently seen in Tang mirrors; the reflecting surface is now degraded.The stand is 17th or18th century and the mirror is earlier Tang Dynasty, 7th thru 9th century.

  • Thumbnail for Seal with container for red ink - side view
    Seal with container for red ink - side view

    Example of a seal made of horn with companion red ink paste holder - viewed from the side. Most likely used for travelling purposes.

  • Thumbnail for Teapot with landscape image - opposite side
    Teapot with landscape image - opposite side

    This image shows the continuation, or perhaps end, of the landscape image. The borders on the top and bottom are meant to evoke a sense of brocade, with the image then appearing like a ceramic version of a handscroll.

  • Thumbnail for Anti-American imperialism poster - 3 of 3
    Anti-American imperialism poster - 3 of 3

    Series of images showing the US involvement in Asia over the first half of the 20th century. In this final section, the US portrayed as Uncle Sam is defeated by the rising sun of Mao Zedong.

  • Thumbnail for Hair ornaments
    Hair ornaments

    This image shows a variety of golden or gilt hair ornaments in forms popular with women of the elite class in the Qing dynasty. Floral imagery and images of phoenixes are common. Other materials present include coral and kingfisher feathers.

  • Thumbnail for Woman's red apron
    Woman's red apron

    Apron worn on the front of a woman's robe. Not an 'apron' in the Western cooking sense, but rather a final garment piece that is worn like an apron. Symbols represented are the eight auspicious symbols.

  • Thumbnail for Teapot with landscape image - front
    Teapot with landscape image - front

    Larger teapot with white glaze and painted landscape scenery of mountains in the distance, pavilion in the foreground.

  • Thumbnail for Pink embroidered garment - front view
    Pink embroidered garment - front view

    Traditional Chinese woman's wear. Embroidered silk with side closures.

  • Thumbnail for Cloissone bowl - bottom view
    Cloissone bowl - bottom view

    Bottom of bowl showing metalwork rim as well as "bottom" of the lotus image.

  • Thumbnail for The Minister of the Right, Minamoto Yoritomo Setting thousands of Cranes Free in Front of Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine, Kamakura to Receive the Blessing of a Pious and Virtuous Life
    The Minister of the Right, Minamoto Yoritomo Setting thousands of Cranes Free in Front of Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine, Kamakura to Receive the Blessing of a Pious and Virtuous Life by Utagawa Kuniyoshi

    The son of a silk dyer, Utagawa Kuniyoshi was apprenticed to the printmaker Utagawa Toyokuni I. whose other pupils included Toyoshige and Kunisada. Unlike his master, who specialized in actor portraits, Kuniyoshi excelled in depicting historical scenes and events along with celebrated warriors. Like many of his contemporaries, the artist experimented widely, producing prints of everything from landscapes to erotica. Kuniyoshi’s first published work was a set of book illustrations released in 1814, although his name remained obscure for several years until his publication of a print series depicting 75 heroes from Japanese lore and legend. When prints of actors and beautiful women (bijin-ga) were banned by the Japanese government in 1842, the Japanese middle class became enthusiastic supporters of Kuniyoshi’s seemingly inoffensive historical prints. In 1843, the artist released a satirical triptych print criticizing the Shogun, launching an official investigation that resulted in the destruction of Kuniyoshi’s woodblocks and unsold prints, as well as an official censure. The print, however, remained popular with the middle class. This prints was most likely commissioned by the official named in its title or done to court the favor of said official. The long title and large size of the print were meant to denote the official’s importance.

  • Thumbnail for The Courtesan Miyakoji of Tamaya Brothel and her Attendants in Edo-cho Itchome Street
    The Courtesan Miyakoji of Tamaya Brothel and her Attendants in Edo-cho Itchome Street by Kikugawa Eizan

    From the Seiro Meikun Zoroi (A Set of Famous Courtesans from Green Houses) series. Though he studied with his father, many consider Kikugawa Eizan to be the best of the late followers of Utamaro. Known for his highly elegant (furyu) bijin-ga the artist continued a stylish elegance that many of his contemporaries eschewed for a more earthy realism. Curiously, he all but ceased ukiyo-e printmaking in the 1820s, a full forty years before his death. Bijin-ga (images of beauties) might be of actual contemporary and historic women or of an idealized type of beauty specific to a time and region. Courtesans in particular were usually depicted in the latest and most elaborate fashions of the day. After an increasing number of censorship laws were passed to limit the production of prints of famous courtesans, thought to corrupt the morals of the citizens of Japan, many artists turned to domestic images of mothers and daughters or women with servants and generalized pictures of the latest fashions in order to satisfy the demand for bijin-ga and skirt the laws.

  • Thumbnail for The courtesan Yaegiri of the Oginoya Brothel and a portrait of the priest Jakuren
    The courtesan Yaegiri of the Oginoya Brothel and a portrait of the priest Jakuren by Utagawa Hiroshige

    One of the most well known 19th century ukiyo-e artists, famous for his landscape views, particularly his images of the Tokaido. Jakuren was a poet and a Buddhist monk was instrumental in compiling the Shinkokinshu (New Collection of Ancient and Modern Waka), around 1205 – 1206, which included thirty-five of his own works. The poem card at the top of this image depicts an image of the poet and his poem which was number eighty-seven in the well-known Ogura Hyakunin Isshu (One Hundred Poems by 100 Artists), a collection of tanka (five line poems of 31 syllables, arranged as 5, 7, 5, 7, 7).

  • Thumbnail for Two women with infant
    Two women with infant by Utamaro Kitagawa

    The dominant ukiyo-e artist of the late 18th century, Utamaro is as famous for his legendary life as for his unsurpassed images of courtesans and famous beauties of his day. Bijin-ga (images of beauties) might be of actual contemporary and historic women or of an idealized type of beauty specific to a time and region. Courtesans in particular were usually depicted in the latest and most elaborate fashions of the day. After an increasing number of censorship laws were passed to limit the production of prints of famous courtesans, thought to corrupt the morals of the citizens of Japan, many artists turned to domestic images of mothers and daughters or women with servants and generalized pictures of the latest fashions in order to satisfy the demand for bijin-ga and skirt the laws.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze rice measure
    Bronze rice measure

    This rectangular tapering vessel is an example of the everyday, utilitarian objects that were fashioned in mold cast bronze in the 18th century. The decoration, which incorporates neatly finished human figures in genre scenes along with typical decorative border embellishments, no doubt was fashioned for use in an important household, rather than for use in a less grand setting. 3 3/4in. high, 5 1/2in wide.

  • Thumbnail for Dawn of the Year
    Dawn of the Year by Ding Fuzhi, 1879-1949

    Artist is a native of Hangzhou on the West Lake and he was an expert in seal carving. As a painter his work falls in the category of 'gongbihua', fine stroke painting. The title is inscribed by the artist.

  • Thumbnail for Eagle on Plum
    Eagle on Plum by Chang Xuchi, 1899-1956

    This powerful image of an eagle on a branch was painted in Boston as a demonstration piece in 1943 during the artist's American tour.