DigitalCC


NOTICE: DigitalCC is down for emergency maintenance. Please contact Cate Guenther, Digital Scholarship and Repository Librarian, (719)389-6875 for assistance.


3808 hits

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 155, Famous Pine on Taishan.
    Thorp Collection 155, Famous Pine on Taishan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Burn victims of the blast, 03.
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Model of the target area before the explosion
    Hiroshima: Model of the target area before the explosion

    This model in the Peace Memorial Museum shows the area between and along the Honkawa River and the Motoyasu River. Since the end of the Edo period (1867) it had been the downtown shopping and entertainment district of Hiroshima, as well as an area of historic temples and shrines. -- Because of the threat of air-raids, several streets were being cleared of buildings during the summer of 1945, to create fire lanes. On the morning of August 6, many middle school students lost their lives because they were in this district that morning, working on the demolition of buildings to create the fire lanes. -- At the head of the islnd may be seen the "T" shaped bridge that was the actual target of the atomic bomb dropped by the Enola Gay. On the bank of the river, slightly to the right of that bridge is the copper-roofed building with a dome, the Hiroshima Prefecture Industrial Promotion Hall, that was almost directly beneath the actual point of detonation of the bomb, the hypocenter. The

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Porcelain Jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Porcelain Jar. by unknown

    Large spherical jar of the sort known as a "Moon" jar. The museum label comments, these jars "...were loved by Korean people not only because of their white color, which was suggestive of Confucian virtues, but also because the form was thought to represent the fertility and gentle, embracing qualities associated with women during the Joseon dynasty." This example presents an interesting comparison with the jar presented in file ecasia000358, another "Moon" jar from the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. The one in Chicago has a more matte glaze surface, while this one has a transparent glaze. The difference in the glaze may be the result of placement in different locations in a kiln, with the matte surface possibly resulting from a slightly cooler temperature and the transparent glaze from a slightly higher temperature, as might result at the different ends of a tube kiln. (The Avery Brundage collection, B60P110+ )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  View of blast damage at the hypocenter
    Hiroshima: View of blast damage at the hypocenter

    This photo of the hypocenter, the point of detonation of the atomic bomb, was taken in the autumn of 1945. The bomb had exploded in the air, approximately 600 meters above the Industrial Promotion Hall. -- The devastation caused by the blast and the fires that followed was total. It is said that the city was reduced to ashes covered by a crust of materials melted by the heat, that the city appeared to be covered with lava. -- A survey completed in 1946 assessed the physical damage in these terms: Of 76,327 buildings in the city of Hiroshima at the time of the blast, 47,989 (62.9%) were totally collapsed and burned. 3,818 (5%) were totally collapsed. 18,360 (24%) were half collapsed and burned, damaged beyond repair. The staggering total of the damage figures is that of the 76,327 buildings in the city, 70,147 (91.9% of all buildings in the entire city) were burned or collapsed by the blast beyond any possibility of repair. -- This image is a section of a photo that is now a wa

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Storage jar, Shigaraki ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Storage jar, Shigaraki ware. by unknown

    A large storage jar in the characteristic Shigaraki form. Produced with the coil and throw technique, as can be seen on the right side profile of the piece. Typical rough Shigaraki clay with bits of feldspathic rock in it, which fused in the kiln to create the smooth white bits of "glass" in the the surface of the piece. The surface shows a slight gloss, the result of "natural glaze" from the firing, as wood ash from the kiln fire would combine with silica in the clay of the piece to form a silicate compound, a natural glass.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with wisteria design, Imari-type Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with wisteria design, Imari-type Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with underglaze cobalt decoration, wisteria design. Imari-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B67P7)

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with bird design, Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with bird design, Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with bird design painted in underglaze cobalt. Kakiemon-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P37)

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud  02
    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud 02

    The mushroom cloud at Hiroshima, photographed 2 - 3 minutes after the explosion, taken from Mikumari Gorge, in Fuchu-cho, about 6.5 km from the hypocenter.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.

    View 2. The A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08  --  "Water! Water, please!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08 -- "Water! Water, please!" by Sato, Yasuko

    Water! Water, please! -- Explanation by the Artist: -- "'Water! Water! Water!' Voices reverberated through the brick building. I was told, 'get their names and addresses,' so I went around asking them. Some moved their mouths but I couldn't hear what they said. Some were already dead. One answered clearly. 'I'm Hitoshi Miyake. first year, Class 1, First Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School.' A little later I went back to see him and Hitoshi was dead, too. Thinking about how he must have felt, I felt compelled to report his death to his family. On my way home, I found his house and told them. His parents just cried and cried." -- The scene depicted was 2,670 meters from the hypocenter, Hiroshima Army clothing Depot, Deshio-cho (now, Deshio-cho 2-chome). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 09  --  "Family touching each other to confirm their presence."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 09 -- "Family touching each other to confirm their presence." by Watari, Shizuko

    Family touching each other to confirm their presence. -- Explanation by Artist: "A couple 40 to 45 years old lying in broken glass, their clothes burned, their bodies charred black, were in their death agonies. Yet they kept saying, "please feed our child." They called the name of the child repeatedly as they slipped toward death. Neither they nor their child could see, so they touched each other to confirm that each was still alive. When I went back with riceballs and water on the 8th, all three were dead." The scene depicted was 3,000 meters from the hypocenter, Yoshijima Air Field (now Yoshijima-nishi, Yoshijima-higashi, Konan 1-3-chomo) Artist was 36 at the time of the bombing, 66 when she drew this picture

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12  --  "Staring dazed at scenes from hell."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12 -- "Staring dazed at scenes from hell." by Fujise, Asako

    Staring dazed at scenes from hell -- Explanation by the Artist: The atomic flame turned humans into insects, smashing people like ants. Running blindly, severely burned, covered with blood, pathetic people turned insects formed a picture of hell. Precious irreplaceable lives were snuffed out in the flames. Even the rivers were unrecognizable in the burning city of Hiroshima. Truly, a picture of hell. Worried about my relatives, I stared at it all in a daze." -- The scene depicted was 2,000 meters from the hypocenter, Hijiyama Hill (now Hijiyama Park). The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 51 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Vegetable plots within an urban setting
    Japan, 1951: Vegetable plots within an urban setting

    The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous- which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Cremation of the dead.
    Hiroshima: Cremation of the dead. by Photo by Hajime Miyatake. Courtesy of Asahi Shimbun.

    Because of the summer heat, it was crucial to cremate the bodies of victims quickly, although it was difficult because of the enormous number of bodies. Temporary cremation sites were set up throughout the city to cremate the bodies that were being brought continuously. In this photo we can see the bodies being piled one upon another with firewood to burn the bodies.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Bicycles frequently used for transportation
    Japan, 1951: Bicycles frequently used for transportation

    In the early period after the war, bicycle were perhaps the most common form of transportation used in Japan, even for the transporting of goods, as seen in this image. [note: description written by IDEAS editor. The photographer, Arthur O. Rinden, did not provide a description for this image.]

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  1. An Introductory Comment
    Japan, 1951: 1. An Introductory Comment

    The images in this set, "Japan, 1951," are selections from a group of slides taken by Arthur O. Rinden during time that he spent in Japan. Most of the images were taken in 1950 or 1951, while one or two were taken at a later time, as noted. -- After WWII, Arthur and his wife, Gertrude, and one of their children, Edith (called Edaik, the Chinese version of her name, within the family), returned to China. In the spring of 1949, due to the civil war in China, Gertrude and Edith were forced to leave, traveling to Kobe, Japan, where Gertrude had been offered a teaching position at Kobe College. Arthur remained in China until 1950, when he, likewise, was forced to leave China and traveled to Japan, where he spent a year based in Tokyo, working with the Congregational Mission Board, the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. -- Unless otherwise noted, the descriptions that accompany these images are quotations of the descriptions written by Arthur Rinden as what he called "scripts," written to accompany slide shows that he prepared for family and others. Note that a few of the images did not have scripts written to accompany them.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims
    Hiroshima: National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims

    The Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Aomic Bomb Victims was erected by the national government in rememberance and mourning of the victims of the atomic bomb explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The hall is built below ground level, with this element above ground. A pool of water, symbolizing the terrible thirst experienced by the victims of the blast, surrounds a circular glass shaft that is a sky light for the interior of the Hall. On the top of the light shaft is a sylized face of a clock, showing forever the time of the explosion in Hiroshima, 8:15 a.m. Around the pool are bits of tile and brick fused by the heat of the explosion, pieces found in the immediate vicinity of the Hall during its construction.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Children orphaned by the A-bomb explosion
    Hiroshima: Children orphaned by the A-bomb explosion

    Children polishing shoes in front of Hiroshima station after the war -- "During the final stages of the war over 20,000 of Hiroshima's children were evacuated in groups to the countryside to protect them from air raids. Theri lives were saved, but many lost their entire families to the A-bomb. There 'A-bomb orphans' were variously estimated to number betweeen 2,000 and 6,500. Residential facilities were set up and attempts were made to care for them, but the sorrow of losing both parents could not be healed."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 24 -- "...the Night of the 6th"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 24 -- "...the Night of the 6th" by Shimormura, Gizo

    Downtown Hiroshima, engulfed in fire, glowing red, floating in the dark Night of the 6th. -- As seen from Koi, 2,500 meters from the hypocenter. Drawn by Gizo Shimomura.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  View of the reborn city today
    Hiroshima: View of the reborn city today

    Early morning, sixty years after the fateful early morning in 1945 -- a view across part of the harbor at Hiroshima, looking toward the city center in the distance, with its skyscrapers and bustling business center. Today Hiroshima is a vibrant city and there is little evidence of the utter destruction that was visited upon this site slightly over half a century ago.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Open air fruit and vegetable market
    Japan, 1951: Open air fruit and vegetable market

    A vegetable and fruit display, with prices listed. Oranges, persimmons, apples, grapes and peaches. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Harvesting seaweed
    Japan, 1951: Harvesting seaweed

    Seaweed gathered and dried before packaging, is a valuable article of food. It furnishes flavor, iodine and salt. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.