Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

3808 hits

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 15, Importance of natural environment, Mrs. Sato's garden.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 15, Importance of natural environment, Mrs. Sato's garden.

    Importance of natural environment, Mrs. Sato's garden. -- Geological processes and hazards are an inescapable part of life in Japan. It is not surprising, therefore, that the natural environment has deeply affected the Japanese, and is an important component of religion, literature, and art. Here natural materials are used to create a small garden which celebrates the beauty of Japan's natural environment.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 159, Yangtze boats, N. Donting.
    Thorp Collection 159, Yangtze boats, N. Donting.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics:  Tea leaf storage jar, Bizen ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Tea leaf storage jar, Bizen ware. by unknown

    Tea leaf storage jar, of modest size (perhaps 12" tall) but strongly articulated as a form. Unglazed stoneware with strong fire markings, characteristic of Bizen ware. Rice straw soaked in sea water salt brine was draped across the form as it was placed in the kiln; at the peak temperatures of the firing, the salt brine would volatilize and combine with the silica in the clay to form an "accidental" natural glaze. This procedure probably was followed initially as a means to keep pieces from fusing to one another in the firing, by separating them with high silica content rice straw, but with the discovery of the result of soaking the straw in brine, it became a frequent decorative technique on Bizen ware. Museum Purchase B67P10

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Fresh water jar, Iga ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Fresh water jar, Iga ware. by unknown

    This Fresh water jar ("mizusashi") is a tea ceremony vessel, an example of Iga ware, a style of vessel created in Mie Prefecture and valued highly by tea masters. Approximately 9 or 10 inch tall, wheel thrown using a light stoneware clay body, fired in a wood fueled kiln with resulting flashing coloration and some natural ash glaze deposits. The black lid of the jar is lacquer, rather than clay, as was frequently the case with tea vessels. The soft clay was manipulated, probably while the piece was still on the potter's wheel, deliberately deforming the piece slightly, which has the effect of emphasizing the soft, malleable nature of the material before it is fired.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 150, Tree and Bridge, Western Gaungxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region.
    Thorp Collection 150, Tree and Bridge, Western Gaungxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar with dragon decoration, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Jar with dragon decoration, porcelain. by unknown

    A fairly large porcelain piece, very full in form. The surface of the piece functions as a canvas for the very bold, energetic brush decoration that covers the entire surface. The image is that of a dragon, a frequent theme in east Asian art, twisting as it moves through the air between clouds. The brush decoration is iron oxide applied under the glaze.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 184, Eroded and Poazolic Red Earth. South Yunnan.
    Thorp Collection 184, Eroded and Poazolic Red Earth. South Yunnan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 185, Shih Lin (Stone Forest), Yunnan.
    Thorp Collection 185, Shih Lin (Stone Forest), Yunnan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 205, Map 1 -  Percentage of the total land area cultivated.
    Thorp Collection 205, Map 1 - Percentage of the total land area cultivated.

    Map 1 - Percentage of the total land area cultivated. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, “Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing,†the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Muroji, 015, detail of Haiden
    Muroji, 015, detail of Haiden

    Detail of the Haiden, hall for worship, directly to the east of the Mirokudo and south of the Golden Hall.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 07, Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate.
    Landscapes of Japan, 07, Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate.

    Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate. -- This nearly two and one-half mile long lava flow was extruded through the east flank of Mt. Iwate. The surface is typical blocky, or aa, type of lava. Note that some vegetation has begun to grow on the lava surface. -- Other volcanic landforms near Mt. Iwate include bubbling hot springs, fumaroles and small geysers, especially in the Hachimantai Plateau to the north.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 08, Caldera occupied by Lake Tazawa, seen from Mt. Komagatake, Backbone Range.
    Landscapes of Japan, 08, Caldera occupied by Lake Tazawa, seen from Mt. Komagatake, Backbone Range.

    Caldera occupied by Lake Tazawa, seen from Mt. Komagatake, Backbone Range. -- Lake Tazawa, the deepest lake in Japan, is nearly circular in shape and about three and one-half miles across. It is nearly 1,400 feet deep and occupies a large depression of volcanic origin, called a caldera. This depression has steeply sloping sides and a mostly flat bottom. The caldera formed when huge amounts of volcanic material were erupted leading to the collapse of the resulting volcano into the vacated, empty chamber below. At least one small cone, formed by later volcanic activity, rises above the lake floor, but not to the lake surface. There are other calderas in Japan, including Lake Towada north of Morioka. Crater Lake in Oregon is a similar feature in the United States.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 18, Coastal features, straight Pacific coast: wave-eroded sea cliffs, wave-cut terrace, Mizushirazaki.
    Landscapes of Japan, 18, Coastal features, straight Pacific coast: wave-eroded sea cliffs, wave-cut terrace, Mizushirazaki.

    Coastal features, straight Pacific coast: wave-eroded sea cliffs, wave-cut terrace, Mizushirazaki. -- Japan has about 18,000 miles of coastline whose configuration differs from place to place depending upon the interaction between shoreline erosive processes and earth crustal movement. At Mizushirazaki, the trend of rocks and geological structures is nearly parallel with the coast resulting in a fairly straight coastline. (Compare this coastline with that shown in slide 1.19.) Waves are actively eroding and undercutting the base of sea cliffs causing them to collapse into the water. As the coastline retreats in this manner, a flat wave-cut bench is produced offshore a few feet below sea level. The flat surface covered with trees above the cliffs is an old wave-cut bench that has been uplifted above sea level by crustal movement. -- Notice the small beaches that have formed from sediment deposition in areas sheltered behind rock promontories.

  • Thumbnail for Nagasaki, Atomic Bomb Museum: Remains of a pair of trousers
    Nagasaki, Atomic Bomb Museum: Remains of a pair of trousers

    At the moment of the atomic bomb explosion in Nagasaki, Koji Shirabe, a first-year medical student at Nagasaki Medical College, was at the college anatomy laboratory. He was wearing a pair of trousers given to him by his cousin. He was reduced to a skeleton by the fires following the blast and was able to be identified only because of this unburned portion of the trousers, which still carried the name of his cousin, Yamamoto. (Donated by Junko Shirabe)

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 156, Unloading Cotton Hankou, Hupei.
    Thorp Collection 156, Unloading Cotton Hankou, Hupei.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 146, Sontu Village, Gaungxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region.
    Thorp Collection 146, Sontu Village, Gaungxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 200, Cliff-Monument of Chukkoliang Wushan.
    Thorp Collection 200, Cliff-Monument of Chukkoliang Wushan.

    Cliff-Monument of Chukkoliang Wushan. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, “Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing,†the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome, 04.  Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome, 04. Peace Memorial Park.

    View 3. A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950
    Japan, 1951: Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950

    Not all is light and color in Japan. Still there linger dark shadows of the war. This is the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce Building- target of the first atomic bomb ever used in war. This picture taken in 1950 shows leaves coming out on a tree thought to have been killed by the bomb in 1945. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rebuilding in the Post-War Period, Construction in central Tokyo.
    Japan, 1951: Rebuilding in the Post-War Period, Construction in central Tokyo.

    Beginning the International Building in central Tokyo. the steelwork allows some flexibility to accomodate for the earthquake shocks. The weight of the steel structure causes it to sink into the swamp on which Tokyo is built, similar to those of Chicago and Shangai. The sign tells that the building has already sunk 18 of the 50 feet required for the four subtererrean stories. A maximum of 9 stories are permitted above ground. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20  --  "The female student I passed was my sister."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 20 -- "The female student I passed was my sister." by Ota, Haruyo

    The female student I passed was my sister -- Explanation by the artist: "It was like a road but there was no road. Not a single person could get through. I was worried about getting there before dark, so I walked right by two female students. One had bandages on her head and arms. One arm was in a sling of calico cloth. The other was wearing a uniform drenched with blood, her head wrapped, face covered with blood, hair singed red. She looked like a demon. For some reason, I spoke to her and discovered to my astonishment that she was my sisiter. I pinched my cheek thinking I must be dreaming." -- August 6, 1945, 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. -- 800m from the hypocenter, near Dobashi. The artist was 18 at the time of the bombing, 48 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06  --   " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly.
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 06 -- " Parents and crying child, wandering aimlessly. by Abe, Hatsuko

    Parents and crying child wandering aimlessly -- Explanation by Artist: " My husband's skin peeled off because of the burn. I held my babywith a broken arm. Blood covered our heads and faces. Skin from our faces and our arms dangled. Barefoot, clothes torn to shreds. "Don't cry. Don't cry. When your cry, I get sad." "Waahhh! Waahhh! (give me the breast)" " I haven't eaten since morning. My milk has dried up. Poor thing." "Waa, Waa." Artist was 24 at the time of the bombing, 81 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  View of blast damage at the hypocenter
    Hiroshima: View of blast damage at the hypocenter

    This photo of the hypocenter, the point of detonation of the atomic bomb, was taken in the autumn of 1945. The bomb had exploded in the air, approximately 600 meters above the Industrial Promotion Hall. -- The devastation caused by the blast and the fires that followed was total. It is said that the city was reduced to ashes covered by a crust of materials melted by the heat, that the city appeared to be covered with lava. -- A survey completed in 1946 assessed the physical damage in these terms: Of 76,327 buildings in the city of Hiroshima at the time of the blast, 47,989 (62.9%) were totally collapsed and burned. 3,818 (5%) were totally collapsed. 18,360 (24%) were half collapsed and burned, damaged beyond repair. The staggering total of the damage figures is that of the 76,327 buildings in the city, 70,147 (91.9% of all buildings in the entire city) were burned or collapsed by the blast beyond any possibility of repair. -- This image is a section of a photo that is now a wa

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige.
    Hiroshima: Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige. by Matsushige, Yoshito.

    This is another of the very rare photographs of the immediate aftermath of the bombing. The photo, taken by Yoshito Matsushige, shows victims huddled at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, 2,270 meters from the hypocenter, about 11:00 a.m., August 6, 1945. In the book, The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears, Mr. Matsushige writes, "I fought with myself for 30 minutes before I could take the first picture. After taking the first, I grew strangely calm and wanted to get closer. I took about ten steps forward and tried to snap another, but the scenes I saw were so gruesome my viewfinder clouded with tears."

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics:  Square bottle by Hamada Shoji
    Japanese ceramics: Square bottle by Hamada Shoji by Hamada Shoji (1894-1977)

    Square bottle by Hamada Shoji. Made with slabs of clay using the press mold technique. Glazed with the material known as "Mashiko stone," a local material that, by itself, with nothing else added to it, forms a stoneware glaze. The glaze is a saturated iron oxide glaze with the orangish-red-brown color known as "Kaki," which means "persimmon." (Gift of Gaylord Hall and Roy Leeper, 2005.88)