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  • Thumbnail for Muroji, 014,  Haiden, hall for worship, seen from veranda of the Golden Hall.
    Muroji, 014, Haiden, hall for worship, seen from veranda of the Golden Hall.

    Directly in front of the Golden Hall, on the south side, is an open area, which is used for ceremonies. The Mirokudo is on the western side of the open area, facing to the east. The small building in this image is on the eastern side of the open area. It is a building for worship, used to honor the dragon of Ryuketsu Shrine, which is directly to the east of Muroji. One of two straw dragons constructed as part of the Autumn Ryuketsu Shrine Festival is hung from a tree in the open area here at Muroji, while the other is hung by the river in front of the shrine, part of an interesting intermingling of rituals between the temple and the shrine.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 176, Windbox Gorge.
    Thorp Collection 176, Windbox Gorge.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 17, Accessibility of natural world in traditional Japanese building style.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 17, Accessibility of natural world in traditional Japanese building style.

    Accessibility of natural world in traditional Japanese building style. -- Over the centuries the constant threat of earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods and tsunami in Japan have produced a culture that emphasizes co-existence with nature rather than the more typical Western approach of trying to overcome or modify the natural world. It is, therefore, not surprising that traditional Japanese buildings have sliding panels that can be opened to allow the outside world to merge with that inside the building. The boundary between inside and outside becomes less well defined and the inside becomes almost an extension of the natural environment.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 02 -- "Help my Daddy and Mommy!" by Onoyama, Hiroko

    Help my Daddy and Mommy! -- Explanation by the artist: "A boy not yet of school age was standing on a crumbled pile of roof tiles shouting, 'My Daddy and Mommy are under here! Somebody help them!' A little baby on his back was crying. but no one could help that young boy." The scene depicted was 1200 meters from the hypocenter, near the Takanobashi Streetcar Stop. Hiroko Onoyama, the artist, was 23 at the time of the bombing, 80 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 07, Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate.
    Landscapes of Japan, 07, Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate.

    Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate. -- This nearly two and one-half mile long lava flow was extruded through the east flank of Mt. Iwate. The surface is typical blocky, or aa, type of lava. Note that some vegetation has begun to grow on the lava surface. -- Other volcanic landforms near Mt. Iwate include bubbling hot springs, fumaroles and small geysers, especially in the Hachimantai Plateau to the north.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 156, Unloading Cotton Hankou, Hupei.
    Thorp Collection 156, Unloading Cotton Hankou, Hupei.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 152, Northeast from Yuan Men Shan, Shandong.
    Thorp Collection 152, Northeast from Yuan Men Shan, Shandong.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 142, Camphor tree in bank, Hengchow, Hunan.
    Thorp Collection 142, Camphor tree in bank, Hengchow, Hunan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 155, Famous Pine on Taishan.
    Thorp Collection 155, Famous Pine on Taishan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Burn victims of the blast, 03.
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Model of the target area before the explosion
    Hiroshima: Model of the target area before the explosion

    This model in the Peace Memorial Museum shows the area between and along the Honkawa River and the Motoyasu River. Since the end of the Edo period (1867) it had been the downtown shopping and entertainment district of Hiroshima, as well as an area of historic temples and shrines. -- Because of the threat of air-raids, several streets were being cleared of buildings during the summer of 1945, to create fire lanes. On the morning of August 6, many middle school students lost their lives because they were in this district that morning, working on the demolition of buildings to create the fire lanes. -- At the head of the islnd may be seen the "T" shaped bridge that was the actual target of the atomic bomb dropped by the Enola Gay. On the bank of the river, slightly to the right of that bridge is the copper-roofed building with a dome, the Hiroshima Prefecture Industrial Promotion Hall, that was almost directly beneath the actual point of detonation of the bomb, the hypocenter. The

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Porcelain Jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Porcelain Jar. by unknown

    Large spherical jar of the sort known as a "Moon" jar. The museum label comments, these jars "...were loved by Korean people not only because of their white color, which was suggestive of Confucian virtues, but also because the form was thought to represent the fertility and gentle, embracing qualities associated with women during the Joseon dynasty." This example presents an interesting comparison with the jar presented in file ecasia000358, another "Moon" jar from the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. The one in Chicago has a more matte glaze surface, while this one has a transparent glaze. The difference in the glaze may be the result of placement in different locations in a kiln, with the matte surface possibly resulting from a slightly cooler temperature and the transparent glaze from a slightly higher temperature, as might result at the different ends of a tube kiln. (The Avery Brundage collection, B60P110+ )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  View of blast damage at the hypocenter
    Hiroshima: View of blast damage at the hypocenter

    This photo of the hypocenter, the point of detonation of the atomic bomb, was taken in the autumn of 1945. The bomb had exploded in the air, approximately 600 meters above the Industrial Promotion Hall. -- The devastation caused by the blast and the fires that followed was total. It is said that the city was reduced to ashes covered by a crust of materials melted by the heat, that the city appeared to be covered with lava. -- A survey completed in 1946 assessed the physical damage in these terms: Of 76,327 buildings in the city of Hiroshima at the time of the blast, 47,989 (62.9%) were totally collapsed and burned. 3,818 (5%) were totally collapsed. 18,360 (24%) were half collapsed and burned, damaged beyond repair. The staggering total of the damage figures is that of the 76,327 buildings in the city, 70,147 (91.9% of all buildings in the entire city) were burned or collapsed by the blast beyond any possibility of repair. -- This image is a section of a photo that is now a wa

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Storage jar, Shigaraki ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Storage jar, Shigaraki ware. by unknown

    A large storage jar in the characteristic Shigaraki form. Produced with the coil and throw technique, as can be seen on the right side profile of the piece. Typical rough Shigaraki clay with bits of feldspathic rock in it, which fused in the kiln to create the smooth white bits of "glass" in the the surface of the piece. The surface shows a slight gloss, the result of "natural glaze" from the firing, as wood ash from the kiln fire would combine with silica in the clay of the piece to form a silicate compound, a natural glass.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with wisteria design, Imari-type Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with wisteria design, Imari-type Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with underglaze cobalt decoration, wisteria design. Imari-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B67P7)

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with bird design, Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with bird design, Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain jar with bird design painted in underglaze cobalt. Kakiemon-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P37)

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud  02
    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud 02

    The mushroom cloud at Hiroshima, photographed 2 - 3 minutes after the explosion, taken from Mikumari Gorge, in Fuchu-cho, about 6.5 km from the hypocenter.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.

    View 2. The A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08  --  "Water! Water, please!"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 08 -- "Water! Water, please!" by Sato, Yasuko

    Water! Water, please! -- Explanation by the Artist: -- "'Water! Water! Water!' Voices reverberated through the brick building. I was told, 'get their names and addresses,' so I went around asking them. Some moved their mouths but I couldn't hear what they said. Some were already dead. One answered clearly. 'I'm Hitoshi Miyake. first year, Class 1, First Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School.' A little later I went back to see him and Hitoshi was dead, too. Thinking about how he must have felt, I felt compelled to report his death to his family. On my way home, I found his house and told them. His parents just cried and cried." -- The scene depicted was 2,670 meters from the hypocenter, Hiroshima Army clothing Depot, Deshio-cho (now, Deshio-cho 2-chome). The artist was 17 at the time of the bombing, 74 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 09  --  "Family touching each other to confirm their presence."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 09 -- "Family touching each other to confirm their presence." by Watari, Shizuko

    Family touching each other to confirm their presence. -- Explanation by Artist: "A couple 40 to 45 years old lying in broken glass, their clothes burned, their bodies charred black, were in their death agonies. Yet they kept saying, "please feed our child." They called the name of the child repeatedly as they slipped toward death. Neither they nor their child could see, so they touched each other to confirm that each was still alive. When I went back with riceballs and water on the 8th, all three were dead." The scene depicted was 3,000 meters from the hypocenter, Yoshijima Air Field (now Yoshijima-nishi, Yoshijima-higashi, Konan 1-3-chomo) Artist was 36 at the time of the bombing, 66 when she drew this picture

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12  --  "Staring dazed at scenes from hell."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12 -- "Staring dazed at scenes from hell." by Fujise, Asako

    Staring dazed at scenes from hell -- Explanation by the Artist: The atomic flame turned humans into insects, smashing people like ants. Running blindly, severely burned, covered with blood, pathetic people turned insects formed a picture of hell. Precious irreplaceable lives were snuffed out in the flames. Even the rivers were unrecognizable in the burning city of Hiroshima. Truly, a picture of hell. Worried about my relatives, I stared at it all in a daze." -- The scene depicted was 2,000 meters from the hypocenter, Hijiyama Hill (now Hijiyama Park). The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 51 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Vegetable plots within an urban setting
    Japan, 1951: Vegetable plots within an urban setting

    The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous- which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Cremation of the dead.
    Hiroshima: Cremation of the dead. by Photo by Hajime Miyatake. Courtesy of Asahi Shimbun.

    Because of the summer heat, it was crucial to cremate the bodies of victims quickly, although it was difficult because of the enormous number of bodies. Temporary cremation sites were set up throughout the city to cremate the bodies that were being brought continuously. In this photo we can see the bodies being piled one upon another with firewood to burn the bodies.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Bicycles frequently used for transportation
    Japan, 1951: Bicycles frequently used for transportation

    In the early period after the war, bicycle were perhaps the most common form of transportation used in Japan, even for the transporting of goods, as seen in this image. [note: description written by IDEAS editor. The photographer, Arthur O. Rinden, did not provide a description for this image.]