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  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 179, Min River, Fujian Province.
    Thorp Collection 179, Min River, Fujian Province.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 07, Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate.
    Landscapes of Japan, 07, Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate.

    Andesitic lava flow, from the 1719 eruption of Mt. Iwate. -- This nearly two and one-half mile long lava flow was extruded through the east flank of Mt. Iwate. The surface is typical blocky, or aa, type of lava. Note that some vegetation has begun to grow on the lava surface. -- Other volcanic landforms near Mt. Iwate include bubbling hot springs, fumaroles and small geysers, especially in the Hachimantai Plateau to the north.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 155, Famous Pine on Taishan.
    Thorp Collection 155, Famous Pine on Taishan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Rinden Kanost Collection, China, 1979:  Women working
    Rinden Kanost Collection, China, 1979: Women working

    Description by Arthur Rinden: 1979:Women also operate lathes for shaping steel articles."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 14, Flat land used for cities, Tokyo viewed from the top of Tokyo Tower.
    Landscapes of Japan, 14, Flat land used for cities, Tokyo viewed from the top of Tokyo Tower.

    Flat land used for cities, Tokyo viewed from the top of Tokyo Tower. -- Flat land is scarce and very valuable in Japan. It is the most productive agricultural land, and also the easiest land upon which to build. Consequently. there is great competition and tension between development and agricultural interests. As the population increases and more people move from rural to urban areas, Japanese cities continue to expand and an increasing proportion of flat land is lost to agricultural and other uses.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige.
    Hiroshima: Immediately after the Bombing, photo and statement by Yoshito Matsushige. by Matsushige, Yoshito.

    This is another of the very rare photographs of the immediate aftermath of the bombing. The photo, taken by Yoshito Matsushige, shows victims huddled at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, 2,270 meters from the hypocenter, about 11:00 a.m., August 6, 1945. In the book, The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears, Mr. Matsushige writes, "I fought with myself for 30 minutes before I could take the first picture. After taking the first, I grew strangely calm and wanted to get closer. I took about ten steps forward and tried to snap another, but the scenes I saw were so gruesome my viewfinder clouded with tears."

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Storage jar, Shigaraki ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Storage jar, Shigaraki ware. by unknown

    A large storage jar in the characteristic Shigaraki form. Produced with the coil and throw technique, as can be seen on the right side profile of the piece. Typical rough Shigaraki clay with bits of feldspathic rock in it, which fused in the kiln to create the smooth white bits of "glass" in the the surface of the piece. The surface shows a slight gloss, the result of "natural glaze" from the firing, as wood ash from the kiln fire would combine with silica in the clay of the piece to form a silicate compound, a natural glass.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 11, Beach at Noda.
    Landscapes of Japan, 11, Beach at Noda.

    Beach at Noda. -- Where there are indentations or bays along coastlines, wave action is reduced. In these more sheltered environments sediment which has been carried along the coast or brought to the bay by rivers from the land, may accumulate forming bars and beaches. If such deposition continues for a period of time, the bay may gradually fill, producing a level plain in the former coastal indentation. There are many such coastal plains along the Japanese shoreline, most of them small and isolated. -- Here, at Noda, barriers have been placed just offshore to further reduce wave action and promote deposition and beach formation and retention.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Jar with lid, Kakiemon-type Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Jar with lid, Kakiemon-type Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain lidded jar with overglaze enamel decoration. Kakiemon-type Arita ware from Saga Prefecture, Kyushu. (Avery Brundage Collection, B60P1206 )

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu.
    Japanese Ceramics: Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu. by Kawai, Hirotsugu (b. 1919)

    Porcelain box with underglaze cobalt and overglaze enamel decoration. (Gift of William Vredenburg, 1991.102.a-.c )

  • Thumbnail for Rinden Kanost Collection, Yi-Lolos people:  Young mother and child
    Rinden Kanost Collection, Yi-Lolos people: Young mother and child

    Description by Arthur Rinden: "This young mother is wearing the typical folded cloth hat worn by Lolo women. The strings of colored beads are suspended from sizable holes in the center of her ears. The silver bangles are hung from holes in the lobes of her ears. The silver was obtained as ransom money received from freeing captured Chinese."

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud  01
    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Mushroom Cloud 01

    Photograph of the mushroom cloud rising over Hiroshima taken about two minutes after the explosion. Photograph taken from the Kanda bridge, Furuichi-cho, about 7 kilometers from the hypocenter, the point of detonation.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05  --  "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05 -- "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire" by Ishizu, Kazuhiro

    Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire 05 - -- Explanation by the Artist: ferociWith the fire licking in ever closer, driven by desparate fear of death, I dug myself out. Buildings on both sides had tumbled into the road. I thought a bomb had exploded right over my head, but the whole city was burning feriously. Nearby I heard a voice screaming in desperate pain, calling for help. A person was trapped under a large tree. He screamed in agony as he burned slowly from the feet up. -- The scene depicted was 1,380 meters from the hypocenter, near Kyobashi Bridge. The artist was 37 at the time of the bombing, 66 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rice cultivation, terraced farming methods
    Japan, 1951: Rice cultivation, terraced farming methods

    The dominant landscape in Japan is still rural. More than half of the arable land is given over to rice cultivation, and 90% of the laborers are farmers. But 84% of the land area is mountainous- which means that each acre of tillable land must support 3,400 persons. The comparable figure for China is 1,400 while for the U.S. it is only 270 persons. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Survivors immediately after the blast.
    Hiroshima: Survivors immediately after the blast. by Matsushige, Yoshito

    Photographs of the immediate after-effects of the A-bomb are very rare. This photo was one of perhaps half a dozen or fewer taken by resident Yoshito Matsushige. It was taken at about 11:00 a.m., on the morning of August 6, at the west end of the Miyuki Bridge, Senda-machi, about 2,270 meters from the hypocenter. It shows survivors of the blast seeking aid for burns and other injuries. The photo has been enlarged to a mural sized image in the Peace Memorial Museum.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Medical care at a rellief station.
    Hiroshima: Medical care at a rellief station. by Photo by Army Marine Headquarters. Courtesy of Keisuke Misonoo.

    The First Elementary School, 2,600 meters from the hypocenter, and other building that survived the blast throughout the city were used as relief stations to provide the very minimal aid that was available to the victims of the blast.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Ewer, Arita ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Ewer, Arita ware. by unknown

    Porcelain ewer with overglaze enamel decoration. Kakiemon-type Arita ware. (The Avery Brundage Collection, B65P59)

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rice Cultivation, harvesting rice
  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12  --  "Staring dazed at scenes from hell."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 12 -- "Staring dazed at scenes from hell." by Fujise, Asako

    Staring dazed at scenes from hell -- Explanation by the Artist: The atomic flame turned humans into insects, smashing people like ants. Running blindly, severely burned, covered with blood, pathetic people turned insects formed a picture of hell. Precious irreplaceable lives were snuffed out in the flames. Even the rivers were unrecognizable in the burning city of Hiroshima. Truly, a picture of hell. Worried about my relatives, I stared at it all in a daze." -- The scene depicted was 2,000 meters from the hypocenter, Hijiyama Hill (now Hijiyama Park). The artist was 22 at the time of the bombing, 51 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10  --  "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10 -- "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest." by Taguchi, Mitsuko

    Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest. -- Explanation by Artist: "She was lying in the middle of the road, where she had died trying to get away carrying her child. Her hair was standing on end and her baby was under her chest, as if still alive. Her eyes were wide open, I still can't forget that shocking sight."The scene depicted ws 1,000 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Central Broadcasting Station, Kaminagarekawa-cho (now Nobori-cho). Artist was 30 at the time of the bombing, 60 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 11  --  "Children crying as they looked at the red sky."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 11 -- "Children crying as they looked at the red sky." by Yoneo, Yoshiko

    Children crying as they looked at the red sky. -- Explanation by the Artist: "What? Whose mother is this?" Looking at the crimson sky over Hiroshima and thinking of their parents, evacuated children were sobbing. Eventually, someone's mother arrived at the temple steps looking like an old rag. She described the situation in Hiroshima and spoke the names of other parents she had met. She also told the names of some parents that would never be returning." The scene depicted was 19.5 km from the hypocenter, Obayashi Lecture Center, Obayashi-mura, Asa-gun (now Obayashi Asakita-ku) Artist was 10 at the time of the bombing, 39 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Ex-Japanese soldier on pier at Matsuyama
    Japan, 1951: Ex-Japanese soldier on pier at Matsuyama

    Just before boarding a ship from Matsuyama to Hiroshima (on Shikoku) we were met on the pier by a Japanese soldier who had fought in the South Seas, been wounded, left for dead, found by American soldiers, and instead of being shot as he anticipated, was carefully cared for until he was well. 'Here is a present of fruit which I want to give you in token of appreciation for what your country's soldiers did for me.' --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 13  --  "A-bombed woman searching for family."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 13 -- "A-bombed woman searching for family." by Akashi, Masanobu

    A-bombed woman searching for family. -- Expalnation by the Artist: " An A-bombed woman searching for her family west entrance, Hiroshima Station." The scene depicted was 1,900 meters fro the hypocenter, west entrance of Hiroshima Station, Matsubara-cho. Artist was 19 at the time of the bombing, 76 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Election Day in Tokyo
    Japan, 1951: Election Day in Tokyo

    Election Day in an industrial area of Tokyo shows political representatives using megaphones as 'loudspeakers' as they describe the virtues of their candidates. Each party representative awaits his turn. One candidate is fined for spending over $3,000. on election expenses! Because all Japanese are literate we can more easily understand why 90% exercise their right to vote. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.