Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

3808 hits

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 153, Weinoiwei, Shandong.
    Thorp Collection 153, Weinoiwei, Shandong.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Victims of the atomic bomb blast.
    Hiroshima: Victims of the atomic bomb blast.

    This photograph, taken by US Army investigators on November 13, 1945, shows a woman's back and arms disfigured with growths called keloids. These growths hindered the movement of joints and were the cause of great suffering, both physical and emotional.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 204, Agricultural Areas of China.
    Thorp Collection 204, Agricultural Areas of China.

    Agricultural Areas of China. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, “Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing,†the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Immediate effects of blast and heat on physical objects, 01.  Melted bottles.
    Hiroshima: Immediate effects of blast and heat on physical objects, 01. Melted bottles.

    Immediate effects from the heat and from the force of the blast and of the ensuing fires in Hiroshima. The glass bottles in this image were melted and deformed by the heat of the atomic bomb blast and the heat of the resulting fires, which consumed Hiroshima as an immediate after-effect of the initial explosion. The stacks of coins on the left in the image were fused together by the heat. The temperature required to cause these effects may have been in the vicinity of approximately 1500 degrees Fahrenheit and, obviously, the effect of this heat on human victims was unspeakable. These items are on display in the Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 20, Wave-cut cliffs, sea stacks, Pacific Ocean at Kitayamazaki, Rikuchu Coast National Park.
    Landscapes of Japan, 20, Wave-cut cliffs, sea stacks, Pacific Ocean at Kitayamazaki, Rikuchu Coast National Park.

    Wave-cut cliffs, sea stacks, Pacific Ocean at Kitayamazaki, Rikuchu Coast National Park. -- This coastline has undergone at least two episodes of crustal uplift. At the present time, wave erosion is forming a wave-cut bench just below the water surface and offshore from the cliffs (the sea stack in the foreground and the isolated smaller rocks showing above the water are remnants on this bench). The level surface notched into the cliffs about halfway up is an older wave-cut bench that has been uplifted to its present position by crustal movement. Evidence of a still earlier episode of uplift is found in the flat surface at the top of the cliffs which is an even older and more extensive wave-cut bench. Note that this top surface is not horizontal but slopes downward toward the ocean in the background. Because it had to be horizontal when formed just below sea level, this indicates that the uplift that raised it was not uniform, but was greater in the foreground.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –-  “Injured, like creatures from another worldâ€
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 01 –- “Injured, like creatures from another world†by Yoshimura, Kichisuke

    Explanation by the artist: “Covered with blood, trudging silently away like ghosts from the city, the injured looked like creatures from another world.†The scene depicted was 4,000 meters from the hypocenter, near the current Yaga 5-chome, at about 10:00 am, August 6, 1945. The artist, Kichisuke Yoshimura, was 18 years old at the time of the bombing, 75 when he did this drawing. -- The drawings presented in this group of images, “Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors,†were photographed in November, 2005, in the gallery area of the Museum in Hiroshima. They were part of an exhibition that rotates annually, presenting drawings created by survivors of the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. -- A sign at the entrance to the exhibition space introduces us to the drawings on display. Quoting the sign, “ This exhibit displays drawings by A-bomb survivors. A drawing by a survivor in 1974 inspired Hiroshima Station of NHK (Japan’s public TV and radio network) to invite

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 06, Mt. Iwate, a composite or strato-volcano, Backbone Range, elevation 6,734 feet.
    Landscapes of Japan, 06, Mt. Iwate, a composite or strato-volcano, Backbone Range, elevation 6,734 feet.

    Mt. Iwate, a composite or strato-volcano, Backbone Range, elevation 6,734 feet. -- Contributing to the mountainous terrain of Japan are about 200 volcanoes constituting about 6 percent of the Japanese land area. Sixty of these have been active at since the 7th century, sometimes with disastrous results. Volcanoes are formed at boundaries of converging earth plates where one plate descends deep enough beneath the other plate to start melting. The molten rock material, called magma below the earth's surface and lava above it, is relatively light and rises to the surface where it erupts. Depending upon the composition of the lava, eruptions range from relatively quiet extrusion of lava to hazardous explosive ejection of ash and burning gases. -- Some volcanoes, such as Mt. Iwate, erupt lava of different composition at different times. These are called composite or strato-volcanoes and have typical concave shapes with steeper slopes at the top.

  • Thumbnail for Daibutsuden, the Great Buddha Hall, at Todaiji, Nara, a video tour
    Daibutsuden, the Great Buddha Hall, at Todaiji, Nara, a video tour

    This movie presents a walk through the Daibutsuden, the Great Buddha Hall, at the temple, Todaiji, in Nara, Japan. The video is approximately 10 minutes long and is comprised of 7 minutes of a walking tour through the Daibutsuden, with ambient sound, but no narration, and concludes with 3 minutes of scrolling text narrative. Created in mini-DV format, it is presented here as a QuickTime movie, compressed to CD-ROM quality. Depending upon your set-up, the video may open directly on your screen or it may be downloaded to your desktop. Download in either case normally may take from 3 to 5 minutes, although it may take longer if you are working with a slow connection.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 19, Coastal features, deeply embayed Pacific coast, Yamada.
    Landscapes of Japan, 19, Coastal features, deeply embayed Pacific coast, Yamada.

    Coastal features, deeply embayed Pacific coast, Yamada. -- The coastline at Yamada is irregular with large bays separated by mountainous promontories that jut into the sea. (Compare this coastline with the straight one shown in slide 1.18.) This kind of coastline can be produced where rocks and geological structures trend across the coastline so that shoreline erosion of weaker rocks produces bays while more resistant rocks are left as headlands and promontories. It can also result from submergence of a mountainous land surface where the flooded valleys form bays and the mountains stand above the sea.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Black Rain.
    Hiroshima: Black Rain.

    This is a section of a white wall from a house that was 3,700 meters from the hypocenter. The roof of the house had been set askew by the force of the atomic blast, allowing the black rain that fell following the blast to run down the white plaster wall, staining it. Analysis of the stains indicated that the black rain contained radioactive fallout from the atomic bomb blast. This section of wall was donated by Akijiro Yashima, and it is now displayed in the Peace Memorial Museum, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu.
    Japanese Ceramics: Covered box by Kawai Hirotsugu. by Kawai, Hirotsugu (b. 1919)

    Porcelain box with underglaze cobalt and overglaze enamel decoration. (Gift of William Vredenburg, 1991.102.a-.c )

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Medical care at a rellief station.
    Hiroshima: Medical care at a rellief station. by Photo by Army Marine Headquarters. Courtesy of Keisuke Misonoo.

    The First Elementary School, 2,600 meters from the hypocenter, and other building that survived the blast throughout the city were used as relief stations to provide the very minimal aid that was available to the victims of the blast.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05  --  "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 05 -- "Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire" by Ishizu, Kazuhiro

    Fleeing with children from the ferocious fire 05 - -- Explanation by the Artist: ferociWith the fire licking in ever closer, driven by desparate fear of death, I dug myself out. Buildings on both sides had tumbled into the road. I thought a bomb had exploded right over my head, but the whole city was burning feriously. Nearby I heard a voice screaming in desperate pain, calling for help. A person was trapped under a large tree. He screamed in agony as he burned slowly from the feet up. -- The scene depicted was 1,380 meters from the hypocenter, near Kyobashi Bridge. The artist was 37 at the time of the bombing, 66 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18  --  "A line of burned lunchboxes"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 18 -- "A line of burned lunchboxes" by Takeuchi, Isamu

    A line of burned lunchboxes, Art -- Exlpanation by the artist: buriedAfter morning assembly, they were probably doing calisthenics. They seemed to be junior high students. I wonder where the owners of these lunchboxes were, laid out so neatly. Because this drill ground was near the hypocenter, the lost lunchboxes were burned but still retained their shape, which makes my heart ache. Thinking of the kindness and love some mother put into each, for them to become last lunches. . . -- 360 m from the hypocenter, Western Drill Ground, Moto-machi. The artist was 25 at the time of the bombing, 82 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10  --  "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest."
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 10 -- "Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest." by Taguchi, Mitsuko

    Mother burned black covering her baby under her chest. -- Explanation by Artist: "She was lying in the middle of the road, where she had died trying to get away carrying her child. Her hair was standing on end and her baby was under her chest, as if still alive. Her eyes were wide open, I still can't forget that shocking sight."The scene depicted ws 1,000 meters from the hypocenter, in front of Hiroshima Central Broadcasting Station, Kaminagarekawa-cho (now Nobori-cho). Artist was 30 at the time of the bombing, 60 when she drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17  --  "Many names written in charcoal on a wall"
    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Museum, Art by Survivors, 17 -- "Many names written in charcoal on a wall" by Matsumoro, Kazuo

    Many names written in charcoal on a wall -- Explanation by the artist: "Part of the wall at Takeya Elementary School. The names of missing people were written in charcoal by those looking for them. 'Hisako Nishimura - tell me where your are - Mother' 'Kazuko, come here' 'Toshie Mitsutani is OK' 'Ippei Masuda, Miyoko is OK, going to Mukaihara' 'Father, Mother both OK, come to Hijiyama Gobenden.' " -- 1,280 m from the hypocenter, Takeya Elementary School, Takara-machi. The artist was 32 at the time of the bombing, 61 when he drew this picture.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950
    Japan, 1951: Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950

    Not all is light and color in Japan. Still there linger dark shadows of the war. This is the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce Building- target of the first atomic bomb ever used in war. This picture taken in 1950 shows leaves coming out on a tree thought to have been killed by the bomb in 1945. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  One of many Japanese fishing fleets
    Japan, 1951: One of many Japanese fishing fleets

    Around Japan are the most important fishing grounds in the world where 1,500,000 persons are employed in securing the largest catch of any nation. They average 70 lbs. of fish per capita per year. Fishing is mostly carried on by large companies which finance effective methods and equipment which is very costly. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 02
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 02

    View looking up at the memorial silhouetted against the sky. The doves are bronze statues.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Restaurant street display
    Japan, 1951: Restaurant street display

    The visualized menu is more effective! Japanese food rates very high in 'eye appeal'- fish, pickles, vegetables, meat, rice, and soybean preparations --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Harvesting seaweed
    Japan, 1951: Harvesting seaweed

    Seaweed gathered and dried before packaging, is a valuable article of food. It furnishes flavor, iodine and salt. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Woman and children at neighborhood shop
    Japan, 1951: Woman and children at neighborhood shop

    In winter, warmth in a Japanese home is supplied from charcoal in a beautiful hibachi. On a cold November day this mother carries her son on her back, covered by a heavy kimono which keeps them both warm. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Election Day in Tokyo
    Japan, 1951: Election Day in Tokyo

    Election Day in an industrial area of Tokyo shows political representatives using megaphones as 'loudspeakers' as they describe the virtues of their candidates. Each party representative awaits his turn. One candidate is fined for spending over $3,000. on election expenses! Because all Japanese are literate we can more easily understand why 90% exercise their right to vote. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Urban street scene in the post-war era
  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Fish or squid being dried in the sun