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  • Thumbnail for Rank badge (part of set)
    Rank badge (part of set)

    These late nineteenth century rank badges were for use by holders of civil office (as opposed to military office). Civil officials of the second rank were entitled to wear a badge depicting a golden pheasant; officials of the fifth rank used the emblem of a silver pheasant. The bird emblems are surrounded by auspicious images. These rank badges could be elaborately produced, utilizing a range of embroidery stitches, metallic thread, kesi tapestry weaving technique and appliquéd motifs. There are two golden pheasant rank badges in this set (although they have been photographed as one, apparently the photographer was unaware that there was a second identical badge below the top one); the one on the bottom is split up the center for attachment to the front of the garment.

  • Thumbnail for Rank badge (part of set)
    Rank badge (part of set)

    These late nineteenth century rank badges were for use by holders of civil office (as opposed to military office). Civil officials of the second rank were entitled to wear a badge depicting a golden pheasant; officials of the fifth rank used the emblem of a silver pheasant. The bird emblems are surrounded by auspicious images. These rank badges could be elaborately produced, utilizing a range of embroidery stitches, metallic thread, kesi tapestry weaving technique and appliquéd motifs. There are two golden pheasant rank badges in this set (although they have been photographed as one, apparently the photographer was unaware that there was a second identical badge below the top one); the one on the bottom is split up the center for attachment to the front of the garment.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze ding vessel (detail)
    Bronze ding vessel (detail)

    This is a standard example of the most popular and enduring bronze vessel shapes. It is an excellent example of mould casting. Normally, the design on the lid of an ancient bronze vessel matches that on the body of a vessel. Here, the decoration on the lid does not repeat that of the body; nor does the lid fit securely on the vessel. These two discrepancies indicate that this lid does not belong to this specific vessel. Bronze lids with similar three projecting prongs have been found in tombs in Sandong and Henan Provinces; the vessels they belong to are considered to date from the Eastern Zhou period (722-256 BC). The surface decoration of interlaced designs both the body and the lid are typical for this period.

  • Thumbnail for Ukiyo-e print of a beautiful woman
    Ukiyo-e print of a beautiful woman by Utagawa (Andô) Hiroshige

    Woman struggling to open an umbrella.

  • Thumbnail for Thai Seated Buddha sculpture
    Thai Seated Buddha sculpture

    13 x 4 1/2 x 3 bronze with gilt sculpture of a large hand from a seated Buddha in the Sukothai style.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese colored lithograph-#6
    Japanese colored lithograph-#6

    20x26 Japanese colored lithograph depicting one of the eight scenes from the Sino-Japanese War.

  • Thumbnail for Shinagawa from Fifty-three Famous Places (Gojûsan tsugi meishozue)
    Shinagawa from Fifty-three Famous Places (Gojûsan tsugi meishozue) by Utagawa (Andô) Hiroshige

    Woodblock print. 13¾" x 9". Paper was issued in the Tokugawa Period (1615-1868) in standard sizes, most prints being in the oban format of 15 x10. The smaller size of this print thus indicates cutting. Condition good with some slight damage and staining. Professor Mandancy’s original list identifies this work correctly as second print in 1855 set, though her letter listed it again mistakenly as part of the earlier set. Old time connoisseurs of ukiyo-e looked mostly at the lines, but today, there is more consideration of the printing of the colors. Studies of the prints of Harunobu by Jack Hillier (Suzuki Harunobu, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1970, pp. 28-31) suggest that this Ukiyo-e artist offered a first state (best rubbed and colored) to a select clientele and then made subsequent larger, offerings (less carefully rubbed and colored) for more casual buyers. Some regard only the first offering as Art, seeing the later ones as closer to reproduction for commercial purposes. Colors have faded in both Hakone and Shinagawa, as is apparent in the pink rather than red tone of the vertical title bar. However, Hakone shows much more careful rubbing than Shinagawa. An example is the blue bar in the sea above the roofline in the middle of the print of Shinagawa. Such a blue bar is common in Ukiyo-e and is called a “number one†(ichimonji) because the character for “1†is a single, horizontal stroke. An ichimonji is made by painting a broad band of color onto the pre-moistened block and then swiping across it to remove some color and so create a tonal variation. Streaks in the blue bar in Shinagawa indicate that this “wipe†was quick and simple. This is also true for the blue at the top of Shinagawa, or the colors of the distant mountains, wall, or other areas. By contrast, the grey color of the large mountain that dominates the left half of the composition of Hakone is much more carefully done. It fades out much more gradually. The grain of the wooden block has also been used to create cliffs and crags in the mountain. Similarly, the rubber used the rough texture of the wood itself to give the dotted look of gritty rock. This effect is particularly nicely done in the area by the shore, where it produces a sandy texture that contrasts to the wet-looking blue water.

  • Thumbnail for Untitled (opposite side view) [Carved wooden modern sculpture]
    Untitled (opposite side view) [Carved wooden modern sculpture] by Sofu Teshigaraha (1900-1979)

    Carved wood, 55-1/2h x 16w x 22d". The piece is an intriguing abstract sculpture, evoking natural forms. The pattern of negative spaces calls to mind the ribs of an animal. It also preserves the marks of the artist’s chisel, as well as the signs of aging (cracking). The textures invite one to experience its tactile qualities. Several different views of this work are needed to appreciate sculpture by an artist better known for an ikebana school. Sofu is better known as the founder of a major school of ikebana, which continues to be active today. The file for this piece includes an undated, color exhibition catalogue with texts by Soichi Tominaga, Dir. of the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo, and Yoshiaki TONO, an art critic. The texts are in English and French. This piece is number 23 in the catalogue. Pasted into the catalogue at the back is a listing of exhibitions of Sofu’s work: 1953 Takashimaya, 1954 Sao Paulo Quatrocentenary, 1956 Takashimaya, 1957 Trienalle, Milan, 1958 est. Sogetsu Kaikan Building, 1959 Martha Jackson Gallery, NY Stadler Gallery, Paris, 1960 “Art and Natureâ€, Venice, 1961 Stadler Gallery, Paris, 1962 Bunjin-ga at the Petit Palais, 1963 Takashimaya.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus shoe for bound feet (angled view)
    Lotus shoe for bound feet (angled view)

    This shoe has never been worn, as the sole is intact and clean and its heels also bear nice needlework. Although the colors and fabrics have either faded or worn out, the stitching is refined. The motifs are often associated with auspicious symbolism (fertility) in addition to its aesthetic quality. The custom of womens' foot-binding has been documented before the 10th century in China, and was officially abolished in the Qing dynasty (1645-1911). However, Chinese women continued to accept this torment as a social norm. The foot-binding custom was not completely extinguished until the 1950s and 60s in China under enforcement from Christian missionaries and foreign military in the 1890s.

  • Thumbnail for Ink-wash wooden wheel fan (side 1)
    Ink-wash wooden wheel fan (side 1)

    This fan features a genre scene in ink-wash style brushwork, The fan emerged in Japan by the 9th century AD. The Japanese have a long tradition of making wooden fans threaded together on the top of each rib. However, the size of this fan is large, and the format (circular when opened to its full extension) may be inspired by a type known as “big wheel fan,†attributed to Korea, during the Yi (Chosen) dynasty (1392-1910 AD). However, the brushwork, subject matter, and motifs of the paintings on the fans are Japanese. The size and weight of the fan might not have a practical function. The common motifs on Japanese wooden fans include stories from literature, such as the Tale of Genji.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus shoe with ties for bound feet
    Lotus shoe with ties for bound feet

    Although the colors and fabrics have either faded or worn out, the stitching is refined. The motifs are often associated with auspicious symbolism (fertility) in addition to its aesthetic quality. The custom of women’s foot-binding has been documented before the 10th century in China, and was officially abolished in the Qing dynasty (1645-1911). However, Chinese women continued to accept this torment as a social norm. The foot-binding custom was not completely extinguished until the 1950s and 1960s in China under enforcement from Christian missionaries and foreign military in the 1890s.

  • Thumbnail for Ceramic vase (base pattern detail)
    Ceramic vase (base pattern detail)

    This is an example of Japanese exported ceramics called “Satsuma ware,†which is characterized by eggshell-colored, clay bodies with finely crackled transparent glazes and painted decoration in gold and other warm tones. After the 1873 Vienna world fair, Satsuma ware became popular and spread to different cities in Japan. However, Satsuma wares were largely produced in Kyoto, Tokyo, and Yokohama. The motifs, which somehow function as a display for different kinds of ceramics/cups/plate, attempted to impress the viewers (foreigners) with the wealth of the discoveries and purchases.

  • Thumbnail for Vieil Ainu, Chikabumi, Hokkaido, Japan
    Vieil Ainu, Chikabumi, Hokkaido, Japan by Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960)

    Color woodblock print, 15-1/2 x 11-3/4". One of a pair of prints of Old Ainu Woman and Old Ainu Man. Both have owl-shaped seals. Both appear to be printed on mica-flecked paper, which adds a subtle richness to the print. Both depict their subjects from the waist up.The male figure has an embossed pattern in his beard and eyebrows.

  • Thumbnail for Sumi-e (ink painting) and gold-leaf landscape
    Sumi-e (ink painting) and gold-leaf landscape by Insho Domoto (1891-1975)

    2’6â€x 2’9,†framed. Signed “Insho†and sealed.

  • Thumbnail for Cotton hood-side view 2
    Cotton hood-side view 2

    Hood made of Japanese cotton and old Japanese kimonos. From Hokkaido.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido - Yokkaichi, Station 44
    53 Stations of the Tokaido - Yokkaichi, Station 44 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. People walking over bridge with grass to the thriving market town and port facing the Ise Bay. Yokkaichi means 'market on the fourth day'. Hiroshige presents the city from a sharp angle from the left; the bridge was one of a series of narrow bridges built over the river and low land close to the seashore to allow access to the market.

  • Thumbnail for Evening at Kintaikyo Bridge, in Spring
    Evening at Kintaikyo Bridge, in Spring by Kawase Hasui

    Color woodblock, 15 1/4 X 10 1/2 inches, ink and color on paper. Shin Hanga print showing one of the 'Three Bridges of Japan'. Built in the late 17th century by Lord Hiroyoshi Kikkawa to solve the transportation problem when the Nishiki River flooded. Hasui presents the five arch bridge and its surroundings in a lyric manner, looking through pink cherry blossoms at a pebbled bank with a man maneuvering his boat beneath the bridge.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido - Goyu, Station 36
    53 Stations of the Tokaido - Goyu, Station 36 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Bare-chested porters walking over bridge in the post town of Goyu, carrying heavy goods for on poles.

  • Thumbnail for Scholars' Occupations
    Scholars' Occupations by Gu Luo (1763-?)

    This colorful and pleasant image of scholars in a garden is a standard subject. It shows scholars playing chess, examining painting or calligraphy, playing the zithers. Servant boys bring books behind. It is an idealized image, set in springtime, and would have been appealing to scholars and to those who shared scholarly, cultural values. 12 5/8 x 106 5/8 inches. Ink and colors on paper.

  • Thumbnail for Gold painted glass tube
    Gold painted glass tube

    It is an interesting and good glass tube, although missing a lid/or stopper (or cord). The exterior of the tube is painted in gold with floral decoration. This should be considered a perfume bottle, and was called a “reclining bottle.†Some identical bottles were made in France, Germany, and Bohemia to hold rose or lavender perfume oils during the 2nd half of the 19th century. This object could have been brought to China by early Lutheran missionaries and families and mixed within the collections.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of a Boxer Supporter
    Portrait of a Boxer Supporter

    28 1/8" x 18 15/16 inches, ink and colors on paper. Formal family portrait of a supporter of the Boxer rebellion. Signed 'Charles F. Gammon 1900'.

  • Thumbnail for View of the Earth
    View of the Earth

    Colored ink and paint on paper, 12 3/4 inch circle with interior concentric circles of varying colors. Mandala-type image with central image made of tripartite grouping of images in a palatial setting.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese wooden statue of the Juni Shinsho
    Japanese wooden statue of the Juni Shinsho

    20 1/2h x 8 1/2w x 6 1/2 d Wooden statue of one of the Juni Shinsho, (12 Devine Generals) Guardian attendants for Yakushi Buddha.

  • Thumbnail for Vertical painting of bird and flowers
    Vertical painting of bird and flowers

    Vertical painting of bird, lotus, and autumn grasses.

  • Thumbnail for Woman With a Fan from an Album of Eight Genre Scenes
    Woman With a Fan from an Album of Eight Genre Scenes by Shen Quan (1672-1762)

    Shen Quan's album of figures include a 1) female immortal goddess on a donkey, 2) a scene of parting, with a male figure carrying a gourd, 3) a couple kneeling before an altar, 4) the three sages (Buddha, Confucius, Laozi), 5) a female immortal with female attendant and deer, 6) a pair of figures cutting bamboo, 7) the woman with a fan, and 8) a pair of musicians. The paintings are competent , but not outstanding. They represent a variety of popular figures, gods, practices and would have had popular appeal in the late imperial period. They demonstrate the strength and vitality of narrative imagery, even in the post-Dong Qichang age, when orthodox landscape painting was dominated with elite views of painting. Each is 6 3/16 x 10 3/8 inches. Ink and colors on silk. To view another of the genre scenes, click on related record below.