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  • Thumbnail for Porcelain saucer dish
    Porcelain saucer dish

    This doucai enameled shallow dish is decorated on the interior with a central lappet roundel within double circle borders; the exterior depicts three cranes, emblematic of longevity amongst cloud scrolls and fungus. The base is inscribed with a Yongzheng (1723-1735) reign mark and is of the period, however the quality of the enameling and porcelain suggest that it was not intended for the Imperial household. 1 7/16 inches high x 7 1/16 inches wide.

  • Thumbnail for Lotus, full view
    Lotus, full view by Wu Shouxian

    Chinese hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting; black ink and trace of red on paper; image area 31 cm x 132.4 cm; brocade frame, flush roller with brocade ends; lotus represents purity, perfection, summer, and the flower carried by Ho Hsien-Ku, the eighth of the eight immortals revered in Buddhist worship; calligraphy, one seal by the artist.

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 1
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 1 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for Orchids and Rocks, full view
    Orchids and Rocks, full view by Wu Shouxian

    Chinese hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting; black ink and tan on paper; image area 31 cm x 132.8 cm; brocade frame, flush roller with brocade ends; orchids adorn rock face; calligraphy, three seals.

  • Thumbnail for A qingbai (bluish white) bowl with an unglazed rim and moulded overlapping lotus petal patterns
    A qingbai (bluish white) bowl with an unglazed rim and moulded overlapping lotus petal patterns

    This bowl has a wide unglazed rim, a flaring mouth and a footring. Its exterior and interior as well as the base of the footring are in a bluish white glaze. According to its glaze color, this bowl is categorized as qingbai (bluish white) ware. Such a typical glaze tone was produced as a natural result of reduction firing in a wood-fired kiln, which was the most straightforward method for potters working in south China. Overall the glazing appears quite even and smooth. The unglazed rim, exposing the thin and finely wheeled buff body, demonstrates that this bowl was produced through a technique of firing called fushao (the rim-down firing). Fushao was firstly adopted at the northern Ding kilns in Hebei province during the mid-Northern Song period and then influenced the way of firing qingbai ware in the south. It is highly likely that this object was invented, perfected and manufactured in large quatities during both Northern and Southern Song periods.

  • Thumbnail for Silk embroider depicting Ouyang Hai pushing an artillery-laden horse off the tracks before an oncoming train (detail train)
    Silk embroider depicting Ouyang Hai pushing an artillery-laden horse off the tracks before an oncoming train (detail train) by Yang Shengrong

    Silk embroidery is today supported by the Chinese government. As in the past, it is not unusual for an existing painting to be copied in embroidery. In this instance, the painting represents one of the mythical heroes of the Peoples Liberation Army (PLA), Ouyang Hai. He reputedly shoved a frightened horse laden with artillery off the tracks in front of an oncoming train. During the Cultural Revolution (1966-1975), PLA heroes, actual or fictitious, became part of the government propaganda machine and were to serve as role models for the people. To advertise their heroic deeds, they were commemorated in all artistic media: paintings, prints, sculptures. This particular depiction of Ouyang Hai was originally created as a painting in 1964 by Yang Shengrong.

  • Thumbnail for Ken Tenju hanging scroll, view of characters
    Ken Tenju hanging scroll, view of characters by Tenju, Ken

    Japanese Edo period hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting and a brown brocade mounting. The image area is 28 cm x 187 cm and depicts the landscape of a Nanga school with the scene of a mountain and hut to the left, a river to the right, a bridge in the foreground, and an inscription to the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for Ken Tenju hanging scroll, upper seal
    Ken Tenju hanging scroll, upper seal by Tenju, Ken

    Japanese Edo period hanging scroll with vertically-oriented painting and a brown brocade mounting. The image area is 28 cm x 187 cm and depicts the landscape of a Nanga school with the scene of a mountain and hut to the left, a river to the right, a bridge in the foreground, and an inscription to the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 11
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 11 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print. The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for Pathway to a Shrine, front view
    Pathway to a Shrine, front view by Kobayashi Eijir?

    Appears from the size and paper quality to also come from the Hasegawa set. The view, looking out of a shrine gateway toward distant houses, with a full moon floating above, is lyrical and evocative.

  • Thumbnail for Painting of a branch of loquats (detail)
    Painting of a branch of loquats (detail) by Ch’i Pai-shih (Qi Baishi) (1863-1957)

    (Part of a set of four) Qi Baishi (1863-1957) is perhaps China’s most revered master of the twentieth century. These four paintings are representative of Qi’s floral, fruit and aquatic subjects. The cascading forms, bright colors and strong sense of abstract design in the compositions are characteristic of his style.

  • Thumbnail for Popular woodblock prints: kitchen god
    Popular woodblock prints: kitchen god

    Colored woodblock prints of popular images are associated with popular religious beliefs and ceremonies mostly observed at Chinese lunar New Year. The printed image of the Kitchen God was burned at New Year’s time to send him off to the Jade Emperor to report on the family; this report would determine the fortune of the family during the coming year. This Kitchen God print includes a calendar for the year 1949, a late survivor of the tradition.

  • Thumbnail for Popular woodblock prints: pair of auspicious boys (1)
    Popular woodblock prints: pair of auspicious boys (1)

    Colored woodblock prints of popular images are associated with popular religious beliefs and ceremonies mostly observed at Chinese lunar New Year. Prints depicting boys wheeling in riches by the wheelbarrow load expressed wishes for accumulated wealth in the family and were appropriate decorations for interior doors.

  • Thumbnail for Rubbing of stone engraving depiction of the poetess Xie Tao (detail)
    Rubbing of stone engraving depiction of the poetess Xie Tao (detail)

    Although of lesser quality, this depiction of Xie Tao is interesting because it is a rare (imaginary) portrayal of a woman writer. The text at the top of the scroll is her biography. Xie (768 – 831/32) was a noted courtesan/poetess who lied in Chengdu, Sichuan. In addition to her poetry she is famous for developing an ornamented paper to be used for writing out brief poems.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s skirt (detail)
    Woman’s skirt (detail)

    In all respects (cut, design, embroidered designs), these two garments are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. The skirt is an example of one way such garments were fastened around the waist – by placing fabric loops over cloth buttons. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Popular woodblock prints: pair of civil official door gods (2)
    Popular woodblock prints: pair of civil official door gods (2)

    Colored woodblock prints of popular images are associated with popular religious beliefs and ceremonies mostly observed at Chinese lunar New Year. Pairs of images of civilian officials holding auspicious symbols conveying wishes for happiness and prosperity were pasted on doors inside the house.

  • Thumbnail for Pair of platform shoes worn by Manchu women
    Pair of platform shoes worn by Manchu women

    Shoes for bound feet of Chinese women contrast with the “platform†shoes worn by Manchu women, who did not bind their feet. These platform shoes, it is said, enabled Manchu women to imitate the seductive sway of Chinese women with bound feet. The decoration on these shoes is appliqué, not embroidery.

  • Thumbnail for Woman’s coat (back sleeve detail)
    Woman’s coat (back sleeve detail)

    This garment with the accompanying skirt are typical of the late 19th – early 20th century feminine fashions. A lithographed print by the late 19th century Shanghai artist Wu Youru depicts two women wearing such garments posing in a photographer’s studio.

  • Thumbnail for Maitreya(?)Bodhisattva in grey schist
    Maitreya(?)Bodhisattva in grey schist

    Hands in gesture of meditation (dhyana mudra). Seated in lotus posture (padmasana).

  • Thumbnail for Japanese women woodblock print
    Japanese women woodblock print by Yoshitsuma?

    9 13/16 x 14 5/16 Japanese wooblock print of women outside.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese print
    Japanese print by Takahashi, Riko [1917-1999]

    9 1/4 x 8 3/8 collograph print depicting a flood.

  • Thumbnail for Mt. Fuji painting
    Mt. Fuji painting

    15 1/8 X 6 3/4 watercolor and ink painting of Mt. Fuji beyond the lake.

  • Thumbnail for Rice Culture II
    Rice Culture II by Hung Liu [b.1948]

    Rich and complex painting by Liu Hung [b.1948 in Changchun, China] appropriates imagery from Buddhist and traditional Chinese painting in juxtaposition with monumental images of anonymous female peasants planting/harvesting rice. This impressive canvas may be interpreted broadly as a comment on the relationship between labor and the production of art in China, with Buddhist and feminist inflections. The imagery is symbolic, art historical, and complex, with a Buddhist apsaras (or heavenly figure) and a repeating pattern of stylized lotus-leaf niches reminiscent of Six Dynasties murals at the Mogao caves near Dunhuang, an oxen from the famous scroll of Five Oxen attributed to Han Huang (ca. 723-787) (Palace Museum, Beijing), a bird that reminds one of the decorative paintings in the flower-and-bird genre of the Song Dynasty.

  • Thumbnail for Pillow (used by ladies)
    Pillow (used by ladies)

    Cushion resting on a wooden base. This type of pillow can be seen in Japanese prints and paintings of the Edo era (1603-1868 AD), so it is identified as “Japanese,†which differed from Chinese pillows largely made of ceramics. It was used by ladies who rested on the back of their neck to avoid messing up their elaborate hairdos. The drawer at the bottom of the wooden base may have contained personal belongings, including jewelry at some point. Its condition is fine, but the colors of the cushion have faded (the design and pattern on the cushion remain visible).

  • Thumbnail for Pair of ancestor portraits (female)
    Pair of ancestor portraits (female)

    Dating from the late 19th or early 20th century, these two ancestor paintings are typical of the genre. The individuals are in formal poses and each wears formal clothing. He wears formal court dress; she is shown in wedding finery, including an elaborate crown and a red robe. Both have rank badges on the front of their garments. Women were denied any role in officialdom, but were entitled to wear the rank badge of their husband. In the late nineteenth century it was customary for the portrait of the wife to be placed at the right side of that of her husband (on the viewer’s left). The use of shading on the faces indicates the influence of Western art and most likely that of photography. The cranes depicted at the bottom of the portraits are symbols of longevity.