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  • Thumbnail for Man's beaded jacket-front view
    Man's beaded jacket-front view by Chief Tonkaling

    Man's beaded jacket made of abaca fiber. From Mindanao.

  • Thumbnail for Men's coat-back view
    Men's coat-back view

    Black silk men'scoat or haori with five white mon. The mon, or Japanese family heraldic symbols, are located on both sides of the chest, on both sleeves, and in the middle of the back.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese wooden statue of the Juni Shinsho
    Japanese wooden statue of the Juni Shinsho

    20 1/2h x 8 1/2w x 6 1/2 d Wooden statue of one of the Juni Shinsho, (12 Devine Generals) Guardian attendants for Yakushi Buddha.

  • Thumbnail for Light green shoes for bound feet (inside detail)
    Light green shoes for bound feet (inside detail)

    Pair of embroidered shoes for bound feet of Chinese women: would appear to come from South China.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese colored lithograph-#2
    Japanese colored lithograph-#2

    20x26 Japanese colored lithograph depicting one of the eight scenes from the Sino-Japanese War.

  • Thumbnail for Amitabha Dharani Sutra - middle of scroll
    Amitabha Dharani Sutra - middle of scroll

    On the fiftieth anniversary of his graduation, Charles R. Bennett ('07) gifted this woodblock-printed, illustrated Buddhist text to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Dating to the year 975, the Amitabha Sutra is probably the earliest printed object in the college's collection. Consider that the world's earliest dated printed book is the Buddhist Diamond Sutra of 868 (now in the British Library) and that the Gutenberg Bible hails from the mid-1400s. Mr. Bennett, who lived and worked in China for two decades after graduating, remarked that the sutra was recovered from a brick of a pagoda in the city of Hangzhou. Indeed , on September 25, 1924, the famous Leifeng ("Thunder Peak") Pagoda collapsed. Erected by a regional king, the Leifeng Pagoda stood on the southern bank of the scenic West Lake for nearly a millenium. In 2000-01, a team of excavators revealed an underground chamber filled with gilt silver and bronze sculptures along with artifacts of stone and jade. In addition, the excavation confirmed the presence of bricks with cylindrical cavities that once held printed sutras. Bowdoin's sutra, not quite 3 inches high but almost seven feet long, is currently mounted as a handscroll. Its condition attests to its age, but as we may still distinguish from right to left a dedication, an illustration, and a sutra text. The dedication tells us that the king, Wang Qianchu, commissioned 84,000 copies of this sutra to be placed in the pagoda in the 8th month of the year 975. The illustration shows two distinct moments. At right a worshipper kneels at an altar table placed before a holy triad comprised of a seated Buddhist deity and a pair of monks. At left, the deity appears to a beseeching worshipper. Radiant jewels hang from above, fragrant flowers rain down, and a splendid stupa is placed at the center, giving the scene a sacred air. Following the illustration, the text records a story of how Buddha once restored a crumbling pagoda. It seems likely that by placing many copies of this sutra in Leifeng Pagoda, the king could ensure the building's continued existence. (text drafted for a Bowdoin College Museum of Art newsletter by De-nin D. Lee. The entire scroll measures approximately 3" x 7'. Woodblock-printed, illustrated Buddhist text. To view more of the scroll, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Bronze Belt Hook (front)
    Chinese Bronze Belt Hook (front)

    3 1/2""h. Cast in relief, a stylized winged dragon coiled in a figure eight, taloned feet with a slender shaft above ending in a bird's-head hook. Traces of gilding present.

  • Thumbnail for Bamboo in Dew, Pine in Wind
    Bamboo in Dew, Pine in Wind by Huang Daozhou, Jiao Bingzhen

    This very long handscroll includes an additional series of colophons as well as a title frontispiece. It is historically quite interesting as the artist, Huang Daozhou, was a notable Ming patriot and martyr. His biography is included beside the portrait, which precedes the ink bamboo and pine. The authors of the other colophons praise Huang. The painting Bamboo in Dew, Pine in Wind is preceded by a biography of Huang Daozhou, and a portrait of Huang attributed to Jiao Bingzhen. 103 x 15 1/2 inches. Ink on satin for the painting. The portrait can be seen by clicking on the related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Painting of One Hundred Boys
    Painting of One Hundred Boys by Gu Luo (1763-?)

    Gu Luo employs the same pastel, bright palette for depicting an auspicious subject of 100 boys playing. This theme would have been functional as a gift for a newlywed couple. The image is delightful and humorous. 11 15/16 x 88 15/16 inches. Ink and colors on silk.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes with Cranes - detail of inscription
    Landscapes with Cranes - detail of inscription by Lu Zhi (1496-1576) (attributed)

    This seventh album leaf is the text attributing the album to Lu Zhi. The attribution is spurious. The landscapes are fairly well done, but at times, the cranes are awkwardly rendered. The subject is an auspicious one, and the album would have made a nice birthday present, wishing the recipient a long life. The images are pleasant, probably dates to the Qing dynasty.10 1/2 x 12 inches. For one image from the album, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes with Cranes - one from an album of six
    Landscapes with Cranes - one from an album of six by Lu Zhi (1496-1576) (attributed)

    This album of landscapes with cranes includes a seventh leaf giving an attribution to the Ming dynasty master painter Lu Zhi. The attribution is spurious. The landscapes are fairly well done, but at times, the cranes are awkwardly rendered. The subject is an auspicious one, and the album would have made a nice birthday present, wishing the recipient a long life. The images are pleasant, probably dates to the Qing dynasty. 10 1/2 x 12 inches. The album contains six leaves total.

  • Thumbnail for Scholars' Occupations - detail of inscription and seal
    Scholars' Occupations - detail of inscription and seal by Gu Luo (1763-?)

    Detail of the inscription and seal found on the Scholars' Occupations handscroll. This colorful and pleasant image of scholars in a garden is a standard subject. It shows scholars playing chess, examining painting or calligraphy, playing the zithers. Servant boys bring books behind. It is an idealized image, set in springtime, and would have been appealing to scholars and to those who shared scholarly, cultural values. 12 5/8 x 106 5/8 inches for entire handscroll. To view the scroll, click on the related record number below.

  • Thumbnail for Scholars' Occupations
    Scholars' Occupations by Gu Luo (1763-?)

    This colorful and pleasant image of scholars in a garden is a standard subject. It shows scholars playing chess, examining painting or calligraphy, playing the zithers. Servant boys bring books behind. It is an idealized image, set in springtime, and would have been appealing to scholars and to those who shared scholarly, cultural values. 12 5/8 x 106 5/8 inches. Ink and colors on paper.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Kanagawa, Station 4
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Kanagawa, Station 4 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Hiroshige presents a nice ocean view of Kanagawa with travelers taking a break in a rustic tea house by the blue water.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Odawara, Station 10
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Odawara, Station 10 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Odawara was a post town facing Sagami Bay. It is said that travelers on the Tokaido often stayed in Odawara for the night to rest in order to prepare for climbing the deadly Hakone pass the next day.l

  • Thumbnail for Pair of Musicians from an Album of Eight Genre Scenes
    Pair of Musicians from an Album of Eight Genre Scenes by Shen Quan (1672-1762)

    Shen Quan's album of figures include a 1) female immortal goddess type on a donkey, 2) a scene of parting, with a male figure carrying a gourd, 3) a couple kneeling before an altar, 4) the three sages (Buddha, Confucius, Laozi), 5) a female immortal with female attendant and deer, 6) a pair of figures cutting bamboo, 7) the woman with a fan, and 8) a pair of musicians. The paintings are competent , but not outstanding. They represent a variety of popular figures, gods, practices and would have had popular appeal in the late imperial period. They demonstrate the strength and vitality of narrative imagery, even in the post-Dong Qichang age, when orthodox landscape painting was dominated with elite views of painting. Each album leaf is 6 3/16 x 10 3.8 inches. Ink and colors on silk. To see another image from the album, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for 53 Stations of the Tokaido: Seki, Station 48
    53 Stations of the Tokaido: Seki, Station 48 by Ando Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

    Color woodblock, 7 X 9 1/4 inches, ink and color on paper. Seki means 'checkpoint', and checkpoints were set up at strategic locations by the Tokugawa government to control traveling, police the road and prevent any unlawful activities. Hiroshige illustrates the arrival of a high ranking official accompanied by his entourage at Seki.

  • Thumbnail for Girl With Brazier
    Girl With Brazier by Cheng Yunhuang

    This is a competent image of a winsome girl executed in the Shanghai school style developed by Ren Xiong and others. Note the eccentric, but lively brushstrokes that represent the folds in her robe.36 3/16 x 8 inches. Ink and light colors on silk.

  • Thumbnail for Mongolian Flint Pouch and Striker (front)
    Mongolian Flint Pouch and Striker (front)

    2" h x 3" w. Leather folding pouch with bail ruyi shaped bronze handle, bronze bird from escutcheons flanking a diamond form made up of bats and ruyi heads around a cross in a circle, all above an axe head form steel base with incised inscription.

  • Thumbnail for Amitabha Dharani Sutra - end of scroll
    Amitabha Dharani Sutra - end of scroll

    On the fiftieth anniversary of his graduation, Charles R. Bennett ('07) gifted this woodblock-printed, illustrated Buddhist text to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Dating to the year 975, the Amitabha Sutra is probably the earliest printed object in the college's collection. Consider that the world's earliest dated printed book is the Buddhist Diamond Sutra of 868 (now in the British Library) and that the Gutenberg Bible hails from the mid-1400s. Mr. Bennett, who lived and worked in China for two decades after graduating, remarked that the sutra was recovered from a brick of a pagoda in the city of Hangzhou. Indeed , on September 25, 1924, the famous Leifeng ("Thunder Peak") Pagoda collapsed. Erected by a regional king, the Leifeng Pagoda stood on the southern bank of the scenic West Lake for nearly a millenium. In 2000-01, a team of excavators revealed an underground chamber filled with gilt silver and bronze sculptures along with artifacts of stone and jade. In addition, the excavation confirmed the presence of bricks with cylindrical cavities that once held printed sutras. Bowdoin's sutra, not quite 3 inches high but almost seven feet long, is currently mounted as a handscroll. Its condition attests to its age, but as we may still distinguish from right to left a dedication, an illustration, and a sutra text. The dedication tells us that the king, Wang Qianchu, commissioned 84,000 copies of this sutra to be placed in the pagoda in the 8th month of the year 975. The illustration shows two distinct moments. At right a worshipper kneels at an altar table placed before a holy triad comprised of a seated Buddhist deity and a pair of monks. At left, the deity appears to a beseeching worshipper. Radiant jewels hang from above, fragrant flowers rain down, and a splendid stupa is placed at the center, giving the scene a sacred air. Following the illustration, the text records a story of how Buddha once restored a crumbling pagoda. It seems likely that by placing many copies of this sutra in Leifeng Pagoda, the king could ensure the building's continued existence. From a text drafted for a Bowdoin College Museum of Art newsletter by De-nin D. Lee. The entire work measures approximately 3" x 7'. Woodblock-printed, illustrated Buddhist text. To view other images related to this work, click on related record below.

  • Thumbnail for Buddhist Deity
    Buddhist Deity

    Lotus flowers typically grow in muddy-bottomed ponds, but they bloom without the slightest stain. This image offers a vivid and powerful metaphor of purity emerging from an imperfect or polluted world. In a small painting recently acquired by the Museum, a crimson lotus with fine gold veins serves as a fitting throne for a Buddhist deity. The deity is Cundi, a feminine form of Avalokitesvara, the most beloved bodhisattva in East Asia. Framed by a perfect white orb and haloes around the body and head, the deity sits cross-legged, or in 'lotus' position. She wears an elaborate crown and jeweled necklace, and her superhuman abilities are signaled by a third eye in the center of her forehead an eighteen arms. Two primary hands communicate through their conventional gesture of teaching, while most of the others grasp symbolic objects, such as the sword of wisdom, the wheel of the Buddhist dharma (or law), and the fruit of enlightenment. Emerging from the sea below, two male figures wear dragon crowns and colorful robes, and carry jade scepters. They are the dragon kings Nanda and Upananda. Each raises an arm to lend additional support to the lotus, suggesting service to Buddhism. The painting is fine and decorative, typical of the courtly style of the eighteenth century. At this time in China, Manchu emperors embraced the esoteric teachings of Tibetan Buddhism and were active patrons of Buddhist art. The image of Cundi, who is unaffected by the turbulent waters and the winds below, presents an image of serenity and she continues to capture our attention today. Text by De-nin D. Lee - published in Bowdoin College Museum of Art newsletter Spring 2006, p7.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Enamel Bronze Fingernail Guard (back)
    Chinese Enamel Bronze Fingernail Guard (back)

    3 3/4" l. Arced and tapered fprm with reticulated design on the reverse and enamel floral design on the front.

  • Thumbnail for Tea Room image 1
    Tea Room image 1 by Seiji Suzuki

    The tearoom is a masterpiece of traditional Japanese architectural design and artisanship. It incorporates both formal shoin-style elements, based on the design of a study or library in a Buddhist temple, as well as the sukiya elements of a humble cottage.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Xingyao Porcelain Bowl (side)
    Chinese Xingyao Porcelain Bowl (side)

    3 3/8" h x 6 1/4" at widest point. Unusual form of "Samarra" type. Ovate and faceted octagonally with beaded strips strung vertically between the panels, a grooved ring on the flat base forming a wide foot ring, horizontal fluted interior with impressed floral spray at the bottom, one slightly raised semi-circle at the exterior only with 'tear' stains running toward the base.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Jianyao "Hare's Fur" Bowl (top)
    Chinese Jianyao "Hare's Fur" Bowl (top)

    2 3/4" h x 4 5/8" w. Flared side turning upward near the rim and indented toward the footring, the dark brown stoneware is covered with a brown glaze inside and two-thirds of the way down on the outside where it has pooled, thinning on the lip. In addition to the brown, radiating streaks of black are on the interior and exterior.