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  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 170, Kungling Gorge Rapids.
    Thorp Collection 170, Kungling Gorge Rapids.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 085, View North of Guiyang, Guizhou
    Thorp Collection 085, View North of Guiyang, Guizhou

    View North of Guiyang, Guizhou. This image and all othrs identified as I.D.Nos. ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing."

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 167, Yichang Gorge and Rapids.
    Thorp Collection 167, Yichang Gorge and Rapids.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 088, Guiyang from wall, Guizhou
    Thorp Collection 088, Guiyang from wall, Guizhou

    Guiyang from wall, Guizhou. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. No. ecasia000072, ""Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing.""

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 130, View fr. Larsen's- Chahar.
    Thorp Collection 130, View fr. Larsen's- Chahar.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 01, Typical mountainous terrain west of the city of Morioka in northern Honshu.
    Landscapes of Japan, 01, Typical mountainous terrain west of the city of Morioka in northern Honshu.

    Typical mountainous terrain west of the city of Morioka in northern Honshu. -- Japan's location, along a boundary where earth crustal plates are converging, is largely responsible for the Japanese landscape. This convergence both pushes up the land surface producing mountains (at the same time causing earthquakes) and generates the volcanic activity characteristic of much of Japan. The result is that most of Japan consists of hills and mountains. The interplay between rapid uplift and rapid erosion by fast moving streams produces a landscape of steep slopes and narrow ridges and valleys. -- This is a typical mountainous landscape. Note the absence of any significant flat floodplain in the valley bottom.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 162, Sm. Valley, Terraced Hills, Yichang.
    Thorp Collection 162, Sm. Valley, Terraced Hills, Yichang.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 161, Temple Gate N. of Yichang.
    Thorp Collection 161, Temple Gate N. of Yichang.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter.
    Japanese ceramics: Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu, modern Bizen potter. by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001)

    Sake bottle by Fujiwara Yu (1932-2001), a modern potter in Okayama, Bizen. The piece is perhaps 6 inches tall, made of unglazed stoneware. In the lower right, we see a suggestion of uncovered clay, the dense dark iron red that characterizes much Bizen ware. The rest of piece is heavily covered with deposits of ash from the firing and the crustiness of the surface suggests that perhaps the piece was in a part of the kiln where it was completely buried in charcoal during the firing. On loan from an anonymous collector, R2002.51.1

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics: Food-serving dish with plant and half wheel design, Gray Shino ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Food-serving dish with plant and half wheel design, Gray Shino ware. by unknown

    Food-serving dish with plant and half wheel design, from Mino region of Gifu Prefecture. Simple wheel thrown form squared off while still in wet state. Museum label describes the piece, technically, as stoneware with inlaid slip. Perhaps the decoration was achieved by coating the entire surface with a dark slip (liquid clay) and then cutting the design through the slip coating to reveal the lighter colored clay of the piece, itself, under the slip. Museum purchase, B76P2

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics:  Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. The form was covered with a contrasting white slip. Several horizontal bands were created by incising horizontal lines through the white slip. Within the horizontal bands, areas, defined by those incised lines, the potter or decorator then used brush and iron oxide to paint design motives on the surface, with the glaze then being applied over the decoration. The Avery Brundage Collection, B65P63

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 189, Shin Lin (Stone Forest), Yunnan.
    Thorp Collection 189, Shin Lin (Stone Forest), Yunnan.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 164, No Title.
    Thorp Collection 164, No Title.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 169, Kungling Gorge Rapids.
    Thorp Collection 169, Kungling Gorge Rapids.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 207, Southeast of Guiyang.
    Thorp Collection 207, Southeast of Guiyang.

    Southeast of Guiyang. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, “Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing,†the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics:  Fresh water jar, Iga ware.
    Japanese Ceramics: Fresh water jar, Iga ware. by unknown

    This Fresh water jar ("mizusashi") is a tea ceremony vessel, an example of Iga ware, a style of vessel created in Mie Prefecture and valued highly by tea masters. Approximately 9 or 10 inch tall, wheel thrown using a light stoneware clay body, fired in a wood fueled kiln with resulting flashing coloration and some natural ash glaze deposits. The black lid of the jar is lacquer, rather than clay, as was frequently the case with tea vessels. The soft clay was manipulated, probably while the piece was still on the potter's wheel, deliberately deforming the piece slightly, which has the effect of emphasizing the soft, malleable nature of the material before it is fired.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 05,Urban population density, seismic risk, Pontocho Street, Kyoto.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 05,Urban population density, seismic risk, Pontocho Street, Kyoto.

    Urban population density, seismic risk, Pontocho Street, Kyoto. -- Earthquake hazards include not only initial ground shaking, but also fire from broken pipelines, downed electrical wires, damaged heating systems, etc. In crowded Japanese cities with narrow streets and many old wooden buildings, such as this, fire can spread rapidly, and with broken water pipes and debris-filled streets blocking emergency vehicles, timely fire-fighting and rescue operations may be difficult or impossible.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 06, Population density, urbanization, seismic risk, high-rise buildings, Shinjuku, Tokyo.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 06, Population density, urbanization, seismic risk, high-rise buildings, Shinjuku, Tokyo.

    Population density, urbanization, seismic risk, high-rise buildings, Shinjuku, Tokyo. -- Increased population and urbanization, combined with the scarcity and consequent high cost of land, leads to the construction of high-rise buildings in many cities. The potential danger in areas of frequent seismic activity is obvious. Modern high-rise buildings in Japan are engineered to strict earthquake codes, but the final test will be the next big quake.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 02, Volcanic risk, Morioka and nearby Mt. Iwate
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 02, Volcanic risk, Morioka and nearby Mt. Iwate

    Volcanic risk, Morioka and nearby Mt. Iwate. -- About 60 Japanese volcanoes (approximately ten percent of the world's total) have been active since the seventh century, and Morioka, like many Japanese cities, is susceptible to volcanic hazards. Mt. Iwate, seen here just north of Morioka, is a composite volcano, hence its eruptions are apt to be explosive. Ash fall, ash flows accompanied by burning gases, and lava flows are all possible should Mt. Iwate erupt. Increasing the danger is the fact that newer suburbs of Morioka are expanding on the flat lands toward the base of the volcano.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 11, Typical small, steep gradient stream, flood risk, Oirase valley.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 11, Typical small, steep gradient stream, flood risk, Oirase valley.

    Typical small, steep gradient stream, flood risk, Oirase valley. -- Small rivers, such as this, are particularly apt to flood during periods of heavy rain. The mountainous terrain and steep gradient, indicated by rapids and small waterfalls, assure that runoff will be rapid and the stream will rise quickly. Flooding is most likely in the early summer rainy period when stagnant weather fronts can produce 16 to 23 inches of rain in a 48 hour period, and during the fall typhoon season. Flooding can also occur as a result of rapid spring snow melt. Along with earthquakes and volcanic activity, flooding is a major natural hazard in Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 13, Tsunami wall, Hiraiga.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 13, Tsunami wall, Hiraiga.

    Tsunami wall, Hiraiga. -- Tsunami are large waves caused by vertical displacement of sea water, usually resulting from submarine earthquakes. Destruction results when these waves wash over a shoreline. Their effects are greatest along irregular coastlines with bays that are broaden towards the ocean and narrow inland, such as the Pacific coast of Honshu. Japanese coasts have been affected by at least 72 tsunami in the last hundred years, and inundation heights up to 100 feet are not uncommon. -- Here a concrete wall has been erected in an attempt to protect the small fishing village of Hiraiga from at least small tsunami.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 02.
    Japanese Ceramics: Dish with handle, Ao-oribe ware, view 02. by unknown

    Another view of the Oribe dish shown in image ecasia000370, showing more clearly the interior of the piece.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 201, Aerial view #1.
    Thorp Collection 201, Aerial view #1.

    Aerial view #1. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, “Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing,†the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 203, Aerial view #3.
    Thorp Collection 203, Aerial view #3.

    Aerial view #3. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, “Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing,†the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 03, Land use, urbanization, high population density, seismic risk, Tokyo.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 03, Land use, urbanization, high population density, seismic risk, Tokyo.

    Land use, urbanization, high population density, seismic risk, Tokyo. -- Because of its location above convergent crustal plate boundaries, Japan records about 5,000 earthquakes a year. On average, one to three earthquakes can be felt at any locality each month, and the historical frequency of major earthquake disasters in Japan is about one every ten years. Hazards associated with earthquakes include ground shaking, fire, landslides, and tsunami along the coastline. The great 1923 Tokyo earthquake left 143,000 people dead or missing, 103,000 injured, and about 250,000 homes damaged or destroyed. With a high population density, high rise buildings, increased population and commuters, the toll from the next Tokyo earthquake may be even greater.