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  • Thumbnail for Dish - E Pluribus Unum
    Dish - E Pluribus Unum by Fitzhugh pattern

    Kidney shaped with scalloped rim; decorated in polychrome enamels, with border of diapers, frets, scales, butterflies, and sprays on the rim, honeycomb-diaper band at the well, central emblem of an eagle bearing a shield and holding a laurel branch in one talon and arrows in the other, and with a banner inscribed E Pluribus Unum.

  • Thumbnail for Plate
    Plate

    Of circular form with half-round section cut from the rim and two holes pierced on the opposite edge ; decorated in famille rose, enamels and gold, with reserved cartouches on the rim containing vases, flowers and ruyi-scepters separated by peony and prunus sprays on alternating diaper patterns, narrow bands at the well, central scene with vase of peonies, basket of lotus flower, two smaller vases and a ruyi-scepter, floral sprays on the reverse.

  • Thumbnail for Ding Ware Bowl - top view
    Ding Ware Bowl - top view

    Low relief molded or carved design on interior; two phoenix birds & flowers. "Greek fret" row above them. Flower on bottom. Light celadon glaze, unglazed rim. One large and several small iron spots. Hairline crack c. 5 cm long down from edge.

  • Thumbnail for Small round celadon pot
    Small round celadon pot

    Top view of blue-green glazed celadon pot, potentially once lidded. Exterior woven pattern hints at a later production date.

  • Thumbnail for L'urne Mysterieuse Plate
    L'urne Mysterieuse Plate

    Copied from an engraving -"L'urne Mysterieuse". Base on urn outlines profiles of Louis XVI & Marie Antoinette and commemorates their deaths. Profiles of Dauphin and Madam Royal hidden in branches. Dot & blue spear border.

  • Thumbnail for Bowl with oval panels - detail of young fisherman
    Bowl with oval panels - detail of young fisherman

    Grisaille touched gold. 3 oval panels: The Resurrection, Fisherman, Neptune and Venus. Floral sprigs between. Variation of spearhead border & center floral sprig inside bowl.

  • Thumbnail for Sixteen Sword Guards - Japanese term, tsuba
    Sixteen Sword Guards - Japanese term, tsuba

    Sixteen individual sword guards made of various materials.

  • Thumbnail for Scene from the series: Story of Loyal, Prominent, and Faithful Samurai, act 4 (Ch?y? gishi roku dai yon)
    Scene from the series: Story of Loyal, Prominent, and Faithful Samurai, act 4 (Ch?y? gishi roku dai yon) by Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1864)

    Woodblock print; ink and colors on paper. Signed: Ichisai Toyokuni Hitsu. Two round censor seals at the top of the picture used between18471848. Right: Yoshimura Gentaro; left: Muramatsu Yoshimura. This print is nice because its border has not been trimmed and the round censor seals are still intact above the top margin of the picture. The series portrays the most famous vendetta of samurai retainers in the Edo period, the Chushingura, or the tale of the 47 masterless samurai (ronin). On the snowy night of January 30, 1703, in an incident known as the Ako vendetta, forty-six samurai who had sworn an oath to revenge their master's needless death burst into the mansion of the man responsible for the death of their former master, Asano Naganori, the lord of Ako. They were led by Oishi Kuranosuke, Asano's chief advisor. Their intended victim, Kira Yoshinaka, was a powerful noble and an important retainer of the imperial household. After refusing the opportunity to die by his own hand, Kira was killed with the same dagger Asano had used to commit seppuku, and then beheaded. At dawn on the following morning the samurai surrendered themselves to the priests of a Buddhist temple to await their punishment. The vendetta served as the basis for what is without doubt the most famous and popular work of the Japanese Kabuki theater, Kanadehon Chushingura (The Treasury of Loyal Retainers: A Model for Emulation). During the Tokugawa era (1600-1868) there was a ban on the depiction in art or the dramatization on stage of current historical events using the actual names of the nobility involved. Therefore, the theatrical version of the Ako vendetta was set in the days of the fourteenth-century shogun Takauiji; Asano, Kira, and Oishi became Enya, Moronao, and Oboshi, and the setting of the play was changed from Edo to Kamakura. Act IV, depicted here, consists entirely of Enya's seppuku, the punishment ordered by the shogun for his attempt on Moronao's life. This scene, filled with quiet, yet terrible, passion, is one of the classical moments of kabuki theater. As the preparations for his suppuku are completed, Enya swears to "return to life again and again until my vengeance is accomplished." From an adjoining room Enya's retainers beg through the closed door to be allowed one last look at their master. In silence Enya, dressed in white, the traditional color of death, waits for Yuranosuke while he continues his preparations. A thick, white tatami mat is laid with branches of ceremonial herbs in each corner. Enya slides his outer-garment off on his shoulders and tucks the long ends firmly under his knees so that the tension of the fabric will cause him to fall face down. At a silent signal Rikiya enters bringing a short sword on a wooden stand. Finally, there is nothing else left to do; Enya gathers his composure, and in a swift motion takes up the sword and drives it into his stomach. Just then Yuranosuke enters and speaks in calm, almost fatherly tones, bidding Enya to die bravely. Gazing steadily into his chamberlain's face, Enya tells Yuranosuke that he must avenge his death using this very same sword, and with a last effort completes the act of ritual suicide.

  • Thumbnail for Blindfold Game
    Blindfold Game by Miyagawa Shuntei (1873-1914)

    Woodblock print; ink and color on paper. from the series: Twenty-four Children's Games (Konodo Fuzoku). Woodblock print; ink and color on paper. Left side of print has been trimmed. "As little as fifty years ago the trend with collectors of Japanese art was to reject the woodcuts of the Meiji era (1868-1912) as being garish and unrefined. To be sure, the introduction of Western pigments and artistic styles (c. 1865) had created a dynamic change in Japanese art. Bold new colour patterns and equally revolutionary design concepts began to influence the art of the woodcut. Far from ruining traditional art forms, however, Meiji artists injected a vitality into the woodcut by amalgamating Japanese and Western forms. The great masters of this era -- Yoshitoshi, Chikanobu, Ginko, Miyagawa Shuntei and others -- thus created a number of beautiful images and contemporary scholarship now favourably compares their works with the art of earlier nineteenth century woodcut artists. The Tokyo artist, Miyagawa Shuntei, produced his finest work at the end of the nineteenth century. His two greatest series of woodcuts, Pictures of Customs and Flowers of the World of Pleasure, were both published in Tokyo in 1897. Shuntei's finest art was in the genre of bijin-ga (beautiful women); portrayals of beautiful women. In this regard, he is often regarded by scholars as a precursor to the woodcuts of the following generation of famous Shin hanga (new print) artists such as Goyo, Shinsui and (most notably) Kotondo." He was born in Aichi prefecture. Much like the rest of his generation of print artists, Shuntei worked as a book and newspaper illustrator. He is best known for his genre print subjects of women and children playing.

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: two friends greeting eachother
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: two friends greeting eachother

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: text for meat seller
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: text for meat seller

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: Men lighting pipe
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: Men lighting pipe

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Temple Bell - bell only
    Japanese Temple Bell - bell only

    Shipped from Yokohama to the campus. The bell is inscribed with the following text in both English and Japanese: "Are we not all one family". Weight: 400 lbs; Diameter: 21.6 inches. A wooden ringer hangs on a post of the torii that supports and frames the bell. Library staff ring the bell at the end of each academic year. Location: basement of Beeghly Library. The library construction post-dates the bell and it appears the stairwell nook in which the bell resides, hovering over a very Japanese-looking bed of rocks, was designed specifically for this piece. Although this is not an old bell from a Japanese temple, it is an interesting, finely created example of the craft, showing the perpetuation of this craftmaking skill into the present age. It is a fitting symbol of friendship between the two cultures and typifies the Japanese propensity for spreading the doctrine of peace through traditional symbolic imagery in the post WW II era.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese table - dragon detail
    Chinese table - dragon detail by Designed by Carl F. Kupfer, and made by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute.

    Size: Height: 78.5 cm, length of the table-top: 118.5 cm, width of the table top: 71 cm. Material: Teakwood, Black Lacquer, and Mother of Pearl. The table was designed by Carl F. Kupfer. It was made of teakwood, black lacquer, and mother of pearl by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute (a mission station) in 1899. No nails were used in its construction. The table is similar to one located in the Baldwin Wallace College Chapel. Both tables have the bishops’ likenesses and Chinese motifs. In the central rectangle of this table, there are figures representing the Board of Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church; at the corners of the rectangle, four small squares contain the likenesses of S. L. Baldwin, W. T. Smith, A. B. Leonard, and A. L. Palmer.

  • Thumbnail for Kabuki Actor at his Dressing Table
    Kabuki Actor at his Dressing Table by Unidentified artist, possibly Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1864)

    Woodblock print, surimono type, ink, colors, and embossing on paper. Surimono were limited edition, fine quality prints produced for a small, select group of clients, in this case, fans of the actor portrayed.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons
    Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons

    Earthenware with brightly colored glazes in blue, green, and yellow. Three are round (one of these broken); two have cloud-shaped borders (one is broken). Provenance: Peking.

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: widow arch
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: widow arch

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)
    Chinese Lady's Changfu (third level informal court attire) robe with designs of flowers, bats, waves, butterflies, and clouds (round detail)

    Roundels contain auspicious imagery--peonies and bats; bats are also featured in the wave pattern hem; and bats, flowers, and butterflies float freely outside the roundels on the front and back of the garment. Plain weave pale green satin ground with sections of dark blue ground on the sleeve; red, blue, yellow and orange satin stitch and seed (Peking) stitch silk thread embroidery. Length: 126 cm; sleeve length: 74 cm length. The ground color was probably originally darker, closer to turquoise. This garment is typical of its type in that it mimics the shape of men's garments. It was made for wives of officials who were required to wear the same type garments as their husbands. Both have eight roundels with embroidered designs, three in front, three in back, and one on each shoulder. The sleeves are cut wide and have bands filled with embroidered patterns between the large cuffs and the shoulders. Women's robes are distinguished from those worn by men by their high side slits and by their decorative motifs, as here, dominated by flowers, bats, and butterflies.

  • Thumbnail for Samurai surimono - limited edition print
    Samurai surimono - limited edition print

    Original surimono by the celebrated master Utagawa Toyohiro, done c. 1795. Toyohiro was a noted ukiyo-e painter, printmaker and illustrator; had studied under Toyoharu, whose studio he entered in 1782. Surimono were limited edition prints, privately commissioned and published to announce or commemorate a special event. They are therefore quite rare, and, if their condition is good, much higher in value than prints for which there are hundreds of extant copies. They are often richly embossed and/or gilded, as here, where there is gilding on the sword scabbard, and plum blossoms embossed and faintly visible. This example has an unusual horizontal format for a print. Because it was a surimono? There do not appear to be any creases; was it rolled, originally? Subject is a bald samurai with shaved pate and muttonchop whiskers. Wears blue hakama decorated with 20 cranes. Huge sword, with some gilding on the sword scabbard. L. hand holds an oversized square box (for sake?). R. hand is an upraised fist. Presence of cranes (symbols of long life) and plum blossoms (blooming at the time of the lunar New Year, and also symbols of bravery) make this an auspicious image, perhaps associated with the New Year holiday.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - building 2
    Mura - 'Village' - building 2 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Mura - 'Village' - building 1
    Mura - 'Village' - building 1 by Inagaki Nenjiro (1902-1963)

    Portfolio of 20 woodblock prints; ink and light colors on paper. Born Kyoto. Alt. name: Inagaki Nenjiro. Graduated in 1922 Kyoto City School of Fine Arts and Crafts. Became a designer of stencil patterns for fine kimonos. Exhibited in craft divisions of Bunten and Kokugakai from 1941. Held several positions at Kyoto City College of Fine Arts. His work as a stencil-dyed fabric designer was designated an Intangible Cultural Property in 1962. In the 1950s he designed multicolor hanga which have the stylized quality of his textile designs but were printed from single woodblocks at Mikumo Mokuhansha in Kyoto. This company had been founded by Ishihara Tadao in January 1942. It still exists today. The prints in the OWU collection are characteristic of Inagaki's works of the 1950s that resemble his textile designs.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese table (top surface)
    Chinese table (top surface) by Designed by Carl F. Kupfer, and made by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute.

    Size: Height: 78.5 cm, length of the table-top: 118.5 cm, width of the table top: 71 cm. Material: Teakwood, Black Lacquer, and Mother of Pearl. The table was designed by Carl F. Kupfer. It was made of teakwood, black lacquer, and mother of pearl by Chinese students at Chinkiang Institute (a mission station) in 1899. No nails were used in its construction. The table is similar to one located in the Baldwin Wallace College Chapel. Both tables have the bishops’ likenesses and Chinese motifs. In the central rectangle of this table, there are figures representing the Board of Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church; at the corners of the rectangle, four small squares contain the likenesses of S. L. Baldwin, W. T. Smith, A. B. Leonard, and A. L. Palmer.

  • Thumbnail for One of the 12 Guardian Generals of Yakushi - back right side
    One of the 12 Guardian Generals of Yakushi - back right side

    16.5 inches in height. Originally painted; much has worn away. Inlaid eyes. Modern base. Almost a dancing stance, w. left foot partially raised, right hand on hip, left hand extended. The DePauw label identifies it as a Guardian Figure of Shogun Jizo, but this does not make sense; it is clearly not Jizo, as Jizo is a bodhisattva who is shown with a shaved head and dressed as a Buddhist priest; he is not a shogun, and not a guardian figure. It appears rather to be one of the Junishinsho (12 Guardian Generals) of Yakushi, the Buddha of Medicine and Healing. There is one general to guard each of 12 Vows of Healing that Yakushi was believed to have made. The most famous examples of this type of guardian figure are at Shin-Yakushiji in Nara (8th c.), and at Muroji (9th c.).

  • Thumbnail for Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons -fragment
    Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons -fragment

    Earthenware with brightly colored glazes in blue, green, and yellow. Three are round (one of these broken); two have cloud-shaped borders (one is broken). Provenance: Peking

  • Thumbnail for Khmer Head of a Divinity
    Khmer Head of a Divinity

    Angkor Wat style; sandstone; 10 1/2in. (27cm.) high. The characteristic detail and sensitivity of Khmer religious stone carving emerges in the facial features and intricate hairstyle of this fragment. With its face firmly set and framed within its hairlines, the image is at the same time both powerful and serene.