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  • Thumbnail for Japanese Temple Bell - bell only
    Japanese Temple Bell - bell only

    Shipped from Yokohama to the campus. The bell is inscribed with the following text in both English and Japanese: "Are we not all one family". Weight: 400 lbs; Diameter: 21.6 inches. A wooden ringer hangs on a post of the torii that supports and frames the bell. Library staff ring the bell at the end of each academic year. Location: basement of Beeghly Library. The library construction post-dates the bell and it appears the stairwell nook in which the bell resides, hovering over a very Japanese-looking bed of rocks, was designed specifically for this piece. Although this is not an old bell from a Japanese temple, it is an interesting, finely created example of the craft, showing the perpetuation of this craftmaking skill into the present age. It is a fitting symbol of friendship between the two cultures and typifies the Japanese propensity for spreading the doctrine of peace through traditional symbolic imagery in the post WW II era.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese Ming Style Vase - view 4
    Chinese Ming Style Vase - view 4

    7" h. Baluster form, very finely painted in brilliant underglazed-blue from the lip down, a band of ruyi heads with hanging jewel pendants, on the bottom of the neck a band of stiff overlapping leaves followed by a narrow band of diamond diaper alternating with four Buddhist emblems, the Wheel of the Law, conch shell, umbrella and vase, followed by a band of pendant three prong spear heads on the shoulder, two chilong standing at the top of a cliff with a twisted tree trunk above and behind them with rock formations, on the tall splayed foot a band of formal lotus pod lappets, stippling and mottling simulating ""heaped and piled"" effect, surface with ""orange peel"" effect, seal characters of Yongzheng and of the period

  • Thumbnail for Bronze Chinese Mirror
    Bronze Chinese Mirror

    H: 3/4" W: 5-1/8". Mirror, bronze disc with light green and yellow patina. Obverse: polished. Reverse: decorative outer edge, inscribed inner edge, center boss raised with hole to attach mirror to support; square container of light wood with sliding lid.

  • Thumbnail for Bowl with oval panels - detail of young fisherman
    Bowl with oval panels - detail of young fisherman

    Grisaille touched gold. 3 oval panels: The Resurrection, Fisherman, Neptune and Venus. Floral sprigs between. Variation of spearhead border & center floral sprig inside bowl.

  • Thumbnail for Don Quixote Plate
    Don Quixote Plate

    Depicts Don Quixote, lance in hand, "Mimbrino's Helmet" (a barber's bowl) on his head, astride Rosinante, and led by Sancho Panza. Floral sprigs in rim touched in gold. Outer foliate border.

  • Thumbnail for Bronze Chinese Mirror - detail
    Bronze Chinese Mirror - detail

    H: 3/4" W: 5-1/8". Mirror, bronze disc with light green and yellow patina. Obverse: polished; Reveres: decorative outer edge, inscribed inner edge, center boss raised with hole to attach mirror to support; square container of light wood with sliding lid.

  • Thumbnail for Scene from the series: Story of Loyal, Prominent, and Faithful Samurai, act 4 (Ch?y? gishi roku dai yon)
    Scene from the series: Story of Loyal, Prominent, and Faithful Samurai, act 4 (Ch?y? gishi roku dai yon) by Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1864)

    Woodblock print; ink and colors on paper. Signed: Ichisai Toyokuni Hitsu. Two round censor seals at the top of the picture used between18471848. Right: Yoshimura Gentaro; left: Muramatsu Yoshimura. This print is nice because its border has not been trimmed and the round censor seals are still intact above the top margin of the picture. The series portrays the most famous vendetta of samurai retainers in the Edo period, the Chushingura, or the tale of the 47 masterless samurai (ronin). On the snowy night of January 30, 1703, in an incident known as the Ako vendetta, forty-six samurai who had sworn an oath to revenge their master's needless death burst into the mansion of the man responsible for the death of their former master, Asano Naganori, the lord of Ako. They were led by Oishi Kuranosuke, Asano's chief advisor. Their intended victim, Kira Yoshinaka, was a powerful noble and an important retainer of the imperial household. After refusing the opportunity to die by his own hand, Kira was killed with the same dagger Asano had used to commit seppuku, and then beheaded. At dawn on the following morning the samurai surrendered themselves to the priests of a Buddhist temple to await their punishment. The vendetta served as the basis for what is without doubt the most famous and popular work of the Japanese Kabuki theater, Kanadehon Chushingura (The Treasury of Loyal Retainers: A Model for Emulation). During the Tokugawa era (1600-1868) there was a ban on the depiction in art or the dramatization on stage of current historical events using the actual names of the nobility involved. Therefore, the theatrical version of the Ako vendetta was set in the days of the fourteenth-century shogun Takauiji; Asano, Kira, and Oishi became Enya, Moronao, and Oboshi, and the setting of the play was changed from Edo to Kamakura. Act IV, depicted here, consists entirely of Enya's seppuku, the punishment ordered by the shogun for his attempt on Moronao's life. This scene, filled with quiet, yet terrible, passion, is one of the classical moments of kabuki theater. As the preparations for his suppuku are completed, Enya swears to "return to life again and again until my vengeance is accomplished." From an adjoining room Enya's retainers beg through the closed door to be allowed one last look at their master. In silence Enya, dressed in white, the traditional color of death, waits for Yuranosuke while he continues his preparations. A thick, white tatami mat is laid with branches of ceremonial herbs in each corner. Enya slides his outer-garment off on his shoulders and tucks the long ends firmly under his knees so that the tension of the fabric will cause him to fall face down. At a silent signal Rikiya enters bringing a short sword on a wooden stand. Finally, there is nothing else left to do; Enya gathers his composure, and in a swift motion takes up the sword and drives it into his stomach. Just then Yuranosuke enters and speaks in calm, almost fatherly tones, bidding Enya to die bravely. Gazing steadily into his chamberlain's face, Enya tells Yuranosuke that he must avenge his death using this very same sword, and with a last effort completes the act of ritual suicide.

  • Thumbnail for Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: meat seller
    Sketches of Men and Things of Fuchou China: meat seller

    A (Western style) bound volume, consisting of 175 pages with text in English by a missionary, with ink drawings done by a Chinese artist. Text and drawings illustrate Chinese people and their activities with detailed depiction of tools and other objects, and activities of everyday life in Fuzhou. According to Susan Huntington, this sort of book was commonly produced by British missionaries to India. This was a very impressive, interesting group of pictures of daily life and people of China. The black ink sketches on the right hand pages are labeled in Chinese, often with English translations. The left-side pages are English descriptions of the activities and objects illustrated by the ink drawings. Nathan Sites was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in Fuzhou between 1861-1895. He was the first Ohio Wesleyan University graduate to serve as a missionary. The book was designed and commissioned by Rev. and Mrs. Nathan Sites, Methodist missionaries to “Fuhchou.†Drawings were made by a Chinese artist. The purpose of the book was to show relatives and friends in America the customs of Chinese in “Fuhchou.†A letter written November 7th, 1863 appears at the beginning of the journal: “Dear Friends at Home: Feeling anxious to give you as clear an understanding as we possibly could of the people, their dress, employments, mode of life of this heathen country, we hit upon the following plan as the best to convey to your minds their appearance, manner and customs. Most of these sketches are really life-like. We have seen men and women engaged in many of the employments here sketched.â€

  • Thumbnail for Page from the book Toshisen ehon gogon zekku - Illustrated selection of poems of the Tang dynasty, poems of four verses, each verse of five words
    Page from the book Toshisen ehon gogon zekku - Illustrated selection of poems of the Tang dynasty, poems of four verses, each verse of five words by Illustrated by Tachibana Sekiho (active late 18th century)

    Double page woodblock printed book illustration; ink on paper. (The museum owns two additional pages from this book). Because the page has been separated from its book, there is no way to know which edition it came from. This is a good example that demonstrates the widespread and popular interest in ancient Chinese literature among sophisticated, well educated commoners (the readers of books such as these) in the Edo period. There exist several printed books with close variations on this title, including one illustrated by Hokusai. But this is clearly not the Hokusai volume.

  • Thumbnail for Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto"- detail of left side
    Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto"- detail of left side

    Detail of left side of screens done in paper on a wood frame. Right screen of an original pair of 6-fold screens; 67" H. x 142" W. (6 panels) The type originated in the Momoyama period, when they were presented to visiting warlords, to take home as a memento of their visit to Kyoto. This particular example is relatively late for the type, but a good example. The iconography for this particular type of screen pairs is set, and this example follows the program for the right hand screen of the original pair, depicting the colorful floats of the Gion Matsuri (Kyoto’s “signature†festival) in LR, and various Kyoto landmarks, like the Kiyomizudera (a temple with a veranda supported on high pilings) in the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)
    Two Balinese Shadow Puppets (puppet 1)

    Height: 50 cm Material: Gilt wood; one wearing silk shot through with gold over cotton petticoats, the other wearing a cotton dress. Balinese puppets came from the small island of Bali. “They are made of painted leather or wood and adorned with splendid garments, mantles, diadems, necklaces...their expressions are either ecstatic or demonic...These figures represent jinn, demons, heroes, and divinities from Indian mythology and legend†(Encyclopedia of World Art). The Bali puppets at Beeghly Library are not the flat-leather puppets (of wayang-kulit) which performed before screens, but are wayang-golek, “a completely rounded wooden figure that was developed in Java, it is less powerful because it is more photographic†(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art).

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - front
    Chinese woman's coat - front

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - detail
    Chinese woman's coat - detail

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for Page from an unidentified book showing a Heian era court lady and child on a veranda
    Page from an unidentified book showing a Heian era court lady and child on a veranda

    Double page woodblock printed book illustration; ink and colors on paper. This book illustrates an unidentified courtly tale of the Heian era, possibly the Tale of Genji, in a conservative, Tosa-school style. It makes an interesting contrast to the illustration of the Tale of Genji, in a more contemporary Ukiyo-e style with bolder colors, by Utagawa Kunisada.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons -fragment
    Chinese flat roof tiles, with relief designs of dragons -fragment

    Earthenware with brightly colored glazes in blue, green, and yellow. Three are round (one of these broken); two have cloud-shaped borders (one is broken). Provenance: Peking

  • Thumbnail for Chinese woman's coat - back
    Chinese woman's coat - back

    Yellow ground figured satin with design of butterflies, flowers, and auspicious objects, and satin stitch silk thread and couched gold thread embroidery with designs of flowers and butterflies. Sleeves have embroidery on green ground silk; center panel and border panel of blue ground silk. Length: 91 cm

  • Thumbnail for One of the 12 Guardian Generals of Yakushi - back right side
    One of the 12 Guardian Generals of Yakushi - back right side

    16.5 inches in height. Originally painted; much has worn away. Inlaid eyes. Modern base. Almost a dancing stance, w. left foot partially raised, right hand on hip, left hand extended. The DePauw label identifies it as a Guardian Figure of Shogun Jizo, but this does not make sense; it is clearly not Jizo, as Jizo is a bodhisattva who is shown with a shaved head and dressed as a Buddhist priest; he is not a shogun, and not a guardian figure. It appears rather to be one of the Junishinsho (12 Guardian Generals) of Yakushi, the Buddha of Medicine and Healing. There is one general to guard each of 12 Vows of Healing that Yakushi was believed to have made. The most famous examples of this type of guardian figure are at Shin-Yakushiji in Nara (8th c.), and at Muroji (9th c.).

  • Thumbnail for Matsunouch - 'within the pines' - English title: 'New Year's Week'
    Matsunouch - 'within the pines' - English title: 'New Year's Week' by Nishijima Katsuyuki (born 1945)

    Woodblock print; ink and colors on paper. The title is a reference to the first 15 days of the New Year when the kadomatsu (traditional Japanese pine tree new year decoration) is placed at the gate of houses and shops. Born in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Nishijima Katsuyuji studied woodblock printing at Mikumo publishing house in Kyoto 1964-1968. Exhibited with Kyoto Independents 1965-1970 and in solo and group shows. Experimented with stencil dyeing and printing 1969-1972. From 1972 focused on limited edition sosaku-hanga woodblocks taking subjects from old traditional buildings. Prints include a series Sixty-Nine Stations of the Kiso Kaido and Kyoto street scenes. This artist works in a conservative style that is popular among Western fans of nostalgic images of old Japan. He is one of the best artists alive today to create images in this genre.

  • Thumbnail for Plum-Blossom Viewing at Kameido Gardens
    Plum-Blossom Viewing at Kameido Gardens by Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1855)

    One of a series of views of Tokyo famous places (Edo in feudal times). Hiroshige signature is at left. In upper right is series cartouche, Edo Meisho, which identifies the print as coming from one of several series of prints by Hiroshige that were published with this title; one such series of 45 prints was published in 1853. Titles say, beginning at left :Edo Famous Places (Edo Meisho), Kameido, Plum View Tea House, Hiroshige. (Yamanka). Image depicts a multitude of people in various acts outside:walking, talking, sitting on large benches and carrying trays. Image size 8-1/8 (L) x 13-1/8 (W).

  • Thumbnail for Korean amulets and chatelaines (1)
    Korean amulets and chatelaines (1)

    These are interesting pedagogically in discussions of Asian shamanism but need further study.

  • Thumbnail for Unknown - Japanese woodblock print
    Unknown - Japanese woodblock print by Yoshida Toshi (1911-1995)

    Edition: 117/150 Woodblock print; ink, colors, and silver on paper. Born in Tokyo in 1911, Toshi Yoshida was the eldest son of Hiroshi Yoshida. Under his father's influence, Toshi began to learn painting at age 3 and woodblock printing at age 13. From 1925-29 he studied oil painting at Taiheiyo Art School and in 1929 traveled with his father to India and Southeast Asia. In 1936 Toshi journeyed to China and Korea. In 1952-53 he visited the US and Europe where he exhibited works and lectured about woodblock prints. In 1954 he taught printmaking for one month at the Art Institute of Chicago and since that time has often traveled to the US, Canada, Mexico, Africa, Australia and Antarctica for sketching, exhibitions and lectures. For a few years after the war, he made prints of abstract subjects, but then reverted to prints of scenery and animals. In 1980, Toshi opened the Miasa Cultural Center in Nagano Prefecture where he taught students from many countries, including Carol Jessen and Karyn Young.

  • Thumbnail for Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto" - detail
    Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto" - detail

    Detail from right screen of an original pair of 6-fold screens; 67" H. x 142" W. (6 panels). The type originated in the Momoyama period, when they were presented to visiting warlords, to take home as a memento of their visit to Kyoto. This particular example is relatively late for the type, but a good example. The iconography for this particular type of screen pairs is set, and this example follows the program for the right hand screen of the original pair, depicting the colorful floats of the Gion Matsuri (Kyoto’s “signature†festival) in LR, and various Kyoto landmarks, like the Kiyomizudera (a temple with a veranda supported on high pilings) in the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto"
    Rakuchu Rakugai - "In and Around the City of Kyoto"

    67 inches H. x 142 inches W. (6 panels) The type originated in the Momoyama period, when they were presented to visiting warlords, to take home as a memento of their visit to Kyoto. This particular example is relatively late for the type, but a good example. The iconography for this particular type of screen pairs is set, and the example follows the program for the right hand screen of the original pair, depicting the colorful floats of the Gion Matsuri (Kyoto's "signature" festival) in LR, and various Kyoto landmarks, like the Kiyomizudera (a temple with a veranda supported on high pilings) in the upper right.

  • Thumbnail for Two Thai pots (pot 1)
    Two Thai pots (pot 1)

    Allegedly from the ancient Thailand site of Ban Chiang. Painted earthenware. When this archaeological site was discovered in the 1960s, it predated the earliest known bronze age site in Thailand, and southeast Asian prehistory was rewritten. Ban Chiang was occupied for over 2000 years prior to the Common Era and its accidental discovery pushed the date of civilization in southeast Asia back nearly two millennia. Ban Chiang is a UNESCO World Heritage Area site, considered the most important prehistoric settlement so far discovered in South-East Asia. It marks an important stage in human cultural, social and technological evolution during the prehistoric era in Southeast Asia 3600 BCE - 200 CE.

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of a Man -  detail of inscription on throne
    Portrait of a Man - detail of inscription on throne

    Possibly an ancestor portrait of a Qing-type figure. Male has graying beard, wears traditional Qing cap. Bright blue, fur-lined robe decorated with cranes on phoenixes. Undergarment has 4-clawed dragons, flaming pearl, over stylized rocks and waves.Very cursive character faintly visible in lower right. Further inscription on base of throne and written sideways shown here.