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  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Convocation September 16, 1969
  • Thumbnail for Peer effects at Colorado College
    Peer effects at Colorado College by Yim, Heidi

    Peer effects in institutions of higher education are often measured in terms of differences in student achievement after interaction with able peers. This paper uses an empirical approach to analyze peer effects on student achievement in classrooms at Colorado College. Under an ordinary least squares model, student academic rating is employed as a proxy for ability – understood to be student “quality” for the purposes of this paper – and the 4.0 GPA scale-equivalent of the grade received in a class is employed as a proxy for achievement. Specific focus is placed on the potential effects that international students and student athletes may have on the achievement of their peers. If these focus groups pose any effects, how do these effects vary with course division (humanities, natural sciences, social sciences)? This paper finds evidence of the existence of peer effects at Colorado College; specifically, international students have a large positive effect on the achievement of non-international students, and the greatest benefit from peer effects occurs in humanities courses.

  • Thumbnail for Exploring Gender Stereotypes at Colorado College
  • Thumbnail for Colorado College summer dance festival
    Colorado College summer dance festival

    Brief video clip of Rosey Puloka, 2008 and 2009 participant, describing the Summer Dance Festival, part of the Colorado College Summer Festival of the Arts, bringing performances by the college and community partners each summer.

  • Thumbnail for Streamlining the financial aid process at Colorado College
    Streamlining the financial aid process at Colorado College by McDermott, Margaret

    The current financial aid process requires a vast amount of time and effort from colleges, students, and the government. There is a lack of transparency hindering students from considering college due to their pessimism towards the exorbitant costs and their unawareness of financial aid options. This paper explores the factors that impact prospective students’ decisions to matriculate at Colorado College using a probability distribution model. With admissions data from 2009-2012, I will simulate a simplified rule in which 25% of family income is allocated for tuition and Colorado College pays the difference. Using this new rule, I will analyze the composition of students who are then likely to matriculate and determine the feasibility of the rule. This 25% rule eliminates a significant amount of stress, wasted time, and effort for all components of the financial aid process while maintaining a feasible amount of aid donations.

  • Thumbnail for An Environmental History of the Colorado College Ornithological Collection
    An Environmental History of the Colorado College Ornithological Collection by McAuley, Sarah Marie

    An Environmental History of the CC Ornithological Collection

  • Thumbnail for Cost-Benefit Analysis of Xeriscaping: A Colorado College Case Study
    Cost-Benefit Analysis of Xeriscaping: A Colorado College Case Study by Babbitt, Phillip

    Xeriscaping, a landscape technique geared towards water conservation, can reduce water consumption by 10% to 50%. The cost of xeriscaping ranges from $0.90 per square foot to $1.45 per square foot. Most studies on xeriscaping examine the issue from a homeowner’s perspective, whereas, relatively few people have explored the issue from an institutional standpoint. Making landscape decisions for semi-public lands, like a college campus, is complicated because there are multiple users. This thesis looks at the potential of xeriscaping on the Colorado College campus. A financial analysis is used to determine how much various xeriscaping projects would cost. To understand how or if the student body would benefit from xeriscaping, a survey was used. Xeriscaping could be an educational tool and help promote a sense of place among the student body. Xeriscaping would save Colorado College water, but how the students would benefit is still unknown.

  • Thumbnail for Streamlining Workflow for Course Change Proposals at Colorado College
    Streamlining Workflow for Course Change Proposals at Colorado College by Kennedy, Christian William

    Our project aims to streamline the workflow for making course proposals at Colorado College. Currently, in order to create a course proposal, professors need to go through a tedious and time consuming process, following specific formatting rules and manually retrieving existing course data to add to their proposals. Our web application offers a more efficient way to generate course proposal documents.

  • Thumbnail for From Prada to Patagonia:  Culture, Consumption and Sustainability at Colorado College
    From Prada to Patagonia: Culture, Consumption and Sustainability at Colorado College by Dell, Olivia Tamara

    In this project, I’m motivated by a desire to understand how to create impactful change through the adoption of sustainable consumption practices and lifestyles. As the negative effects of climate change continue to grow, I seek to better understand how I and my peers can make changes in our own lives to move away from unsustainable consumption practices. In this project, I explore the unique community of Colorado College (CC) and ask questions about this community’s culture, values, and practices in an attempt to better understand how messages of sustainability infused into popular culture can translate into meaningful action. I use focus groups to build a dialogue around CC’s culture and shed light on some of the sustainability successes and challenges faced by this community. I found that many individuals within the Colorado College community perceive the school’s unique culture as supportive of a narrative of sustainability. When thought of through a sociological perspective, this finding can have implications for the ways individuals act and consume within their social realm. Additionally, I found that in some ways, the dominant culture at Colorado College depends on classed expressions of taste and positionality, thus pointing to the exclusionary potential of this culture. This research holds implications for the ways messages of sustainability can be infused into and supported by popular culture and sheds light on some of the challenges and successes faced by communities with a perceived strong emphasis on sustainable lifestyles. In the future, this research can lead to a discussion of how sustainable consumption practices and lifestyles can be promoted through the process of shifting cultural norms and the implementation of institutional initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for YOUNG ALUMNI GIVING HABITS AT COLORADO COLLEGE
    YOUNG ALUMNI GIVING HABITS AT COLORADO COLLEGE by Guerrero, Karina Nicole

    Higher education institutions rely heavily on their alumni to donate in order to keep their costs low. This paper focuses on Colorado College’s most sporadic givers - young alumni, and analyzing what characteristics on and off campus these donators share. I use data from the Colorado College advancements database for information on young alumni from the years 2000-2015 to create an OLS regression that focus on attributes that describe alumni life on campus and post graduate. I find that overall what an alum was involved in while on campus positively associates with a higher likelihood that they will donate post grad. This correlation was prominently found between what an alum majored in. Furthermore in young alumni postgraduate life marital status and marital status to another Colorado College alumni illustrate a high relationship with giving, while average median income, and being a female negatively correlated. These conclusions provide insight into the importance of the experiences a student has on campus that helps create a strong bond to the school thus causing them to want to continue to be involved with the college and ultimately donate regardless of where and how much they make post grad.

  • Thumbnail for "We are CC": A 'Fight Song' for Colorado College
  • Thumbnail for Email Marketing For Advancement: Understanding the Impact of Email Solicitations on Donations at Colorado College
    Email Marketing For Advancement: Understanding the Impact of Email Solicitations on Donations at Colorado College by Whitney, Lona Maria

    This thesis helps build a better understanding of how email communications impact charitable giving to Colorado College. Specifically, it examined how email performance metrics commonly used to measure email performance translate into dollar amounts of donations. The findings of this research can be used to inform decisions regarding the college’s digital communication strategy and to create more effective, targeted communications that can increase the number of donations Colorado College receives per email sent out. The results of this research indicate that email performance metrics – specifically the open rate – can be used to determine how an email translated to donations. The coefficients on the open rate were used to develop a simplified email scoring system that gives the everyday email communicators of CC a tangible tool to gauge how their email actually performed.

  • Thumbnail for The hidden challenges of "class" : social class and race at Colorado College
    The hidden challenges of "class" : social class and race at Colorado College by Callahan, Kathleen

    This study examines the effects of social class, race, and cultural capital on academic experience and social belonging at Colorado College. Survey data from a sample of Colorado College students about academic and social engagement at CC is analyzed in an attempt to explore how students are impacted by their social class, race, and cultural capital. Specifically, this study analyzes classroom engagement, intellectual confidence, and social belonging at Colorado College, focusing primarily on how social class and race/ethnicity intersect in ways to affect educational and social outcomes. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which “doubly disadvantaged” students, those who are first generation college students and students of color experience unique challenges at a predominantly white institution. The analysis suggests that first generation students of color face more challenges in the classroom and feel less connected to the student body than their peers. The study’s findings suggest that more attention and support need to be given to the “doubly disadvantaged” to help increase their academic and social engagement at CC. Additionally, this study advocates more research be done on the inequalities that working class minority students face within the education system.

  • Thumbnail for Why alumni (don’t) give : motivations of charitable giving at Colorado College
    Why alumni (don’t) give : motivations of charitable giving at Colorado College by Lee, Nathan Harry

    In 2012 Colorado College has a low rate of alumni giving of less than 19%. The top colleges in this category boast a rate of more than 50%. At this time, Colorado College is a highly selective and competitive private liberal arts college. In 2012, philanthropic giving to institutions of higher education totaled more than $31 billion. This study seeks to identify the motivations of Colorado College alumni to give philanthropically to their alma mater. A survey used by Hubert (2009) was modified and sent out to 1000 CC alumni. Five groups of alumni were targeted: those who give regularly, those who used to give but no longer do so, those who have never given, alumni who live outside the state of Colorado, and alumni who live in Colorado. In addition, different direct mailing strategies were used to attempt to influence response rates. This study finds that the major motivations of charitable giving among CC alumni are loyalty to the institution, the establishment of a relationship with the institution, and financial security.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College
    Colorado College

    In this brief message, Colorado College President Jill Tiefenthaler explains the value of liberal arts education.

  • Thumbnail for ‘The Cistem Isn’t Built For Me’: A Collaborative Thesis  With the Colorado College Trans Community
    ‘The Cistem Isn’t Built For Me’: A Collaborative Thesis With the Colorado College Trans Community by Perry, Grace Nicole

    This study used Photovoice—a participatory, community-based methodology—to explore the daily, lived experiences of trans students at Colorado College. Research revealed that, despite Colorado College’s institutional commitment to (trans)gender justice, current trans students continue to experience exclusion, erasure and fear on campus in structurally and interactionally gendered spaces. These pervasive adversities persist because of trans-exclusionary, macro ideologies (i.e., the gender binary, cisnormativity and trans aversion/phobia), which permeate even “inclusive” spaces. While some cisgender community members acted intentionally and affirmatively with trans students, such moments were exceptional, demonstrating the need to implement institutional policies which elicit trans inclusion on a micro-interactional level. This paper culminates with two specific examples of such policies proposed by participants: (1) institutionalize the college’s pronoun practice and (2) change the current policy surrounding legal names.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Views 01
    Campus Views 01 by Westesen family

    Photograph taken circa 1929-1930 on the Colorado College campus.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Views 02
    Campus Views 02 by Westesen family

    Photograph taken circa 1929-1930 on the Colorado College campus. View looking west.

  • Thumbnail for Laptop use in the classroom : a cost/benefit analysis based on participation
    Laptop use in the classroom : a cost/benefit analysis based on participation by Vargas, Matthew Voyta

    The College classroom environment has changed since the advent of the personal computers. More and more students are frequently bringing their laptops into the classroom at colleges around the country. While those students bring their laptops to the classroom, instructors’ perceptions of laptop use continue to change. Therefore, the issue of this generation is whether or not students understand their own perceptions of the costs and benefits of laptop use given the costs of diminishment of learning in the classroom and the benefits of improved learning through software and programs on the laptop. The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not students whom bring their laptop to the classroom understand if their use of laptops are improving or diminishing their learning experience based on participation. This research surveyed six classes in the Economics Department during Block Three of the 2011-2012 Colorado College school year. The survey information was then be used for regression analysis in order to determine dependent variable impact on the independent variables: LISTEN, ASKQUES, ANSQUES, and DISCUSS.

  • Thumbnail for HOW CAN FORMAL ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES ENHANCE SUSTAINABILITY IN LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES?:  A CASE STUDY OF COLORADO COLLEGE
    HOW CAN FORMAL ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES ENHANCE SUSTAINABILITY IN LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES?: A CASE STUDY OF COLORADO COLLEGE by Haslett, Fiona Sinclair

    The “institutional inertia” for Education for Sustainability (EfS) in liberal arts institutions is often attributed to faculty perceptions that EfS is not relevant within their area of expertise. However, sustainability is most effectively integrated into an institution when the formal administrative structures align to prioritize a whole system approach. After conducting 40 interviews with professors across all divisions, we developed an understanding of academics’ attitudes, values, and experiences to identify areas where EfS can be more effectively woven into informal campus activities and curricula. In addition, the formal administrative structures of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) can promote incongruences between faculty beliefs and campus practices. Findings from this qualitative study are divided into three hypotheses that a liberal arts education should: (1) transition away from teaching within disciplines and establish curricula structured around the process of learning, the development of skills, and the acquisition of knowledge through transdisciplinary topics, (2) create a context for student learning that engages the affective domain and fosters opportunities to develop individual values, attitudes and passions, (3) prioritize a process of learning that includes active participation and an inquiry-based approach to develop students as leaders and agents of change.  

  • Thumbnail for Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans
    Chicana/o language, culture, and history : identity construction and self-representation of Mexican-Americans by Steeler, Elizabeth

    The following research concerning Chicana/o identity formation and self-representation was conducted at The Colorado College throughout November and December of 2011, and January and February of 2012. Not only are established theories on identity and culture utilized but research case studies and other ethnographies on the subject of Chicana/o language and culture are also examined in the following project. Along with this review of existing frameworks I examine Chicana/o culture and language through the analysis of various works of Chicana/o literature. Using these assorted resources, I show how Chicana/o language, culture, and history give structure to the identities of Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Research on this specific topic is important because immigration from Mexico is on the forefront of the political arena in the United States. The prevalence of Mexican-Americans living in the United States is encouraging important changes in economic and institutional policies. In order to make these changes, there must be knowledge of the Chicana/o language, culture, and history. How these concepts shape the identities of Mexican Americans is integral in understanding the specific policies that have been, and will continue to affect Chicanas/os all over the United States. My research will help bring this information into the public and academic spheres as well as demonstrate the roles that language, culture, and history play in shaping identity and creating a representation of oneself.

  • Thumbnail for Demystifying Diversity: An Attempt to Unpack Cultural Scripts at Colorado College
    Demystifying Diversity: An Attempt to Unpack Cultural Scripts at Colorado College by Malecek, Anne

    This paper seeks to explore issues of social inclusivity (and exclusivity) at Colorado College, as diversity related issues prove to be problematic for universities across the nation. In this specific study, I examined how structural factors (socioeconomic status, race, and numerical representation) influence campus belonging, as I conducted a correspondence analysis on social clique formation at CC. In doing so, I ultimately found that the existing structures/cultural scripts that construct CC reality greatly inhibit students of color from establishing membership on campus, as social belonging and particularity is privilege reserved for the elite (the white). Campus inequality thus lies within this distinction, as (rich) whites are allowed to become embodied performers of the CC brand, while (poor) students of color are cast as the sole performers of CC “diversity” and campus difference.

  • Thumbnail for "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College
    "I'm on the in": an integrative Bourdieuian analysis of gender negotiation among female marijuana users at Colorado College by Rogers, Katie

    Existing analyses of gender relations in youth marijuana subcultures have consistently shown these social fields to be economically, socially, and culturally male-dominated. Despite this disparity and the questions it raises about the gendered investments and negotiations of woman who tap into this subculture, scholars have yet to employ case-specific, qualitative methods to investigate the subjective experiences of female marijuana users. Building on contemporary feminist integrations of gender into Pierre Bourdieu’s theories of social reproduction, this thesis uses the hybrid concepts of gendered field, gendered capital, and gendered habitus to perceive a typology of female marijuana users at Colorado College from 17 purposively sampled interviews. I posit that of the four observable types – guest moochers, honorary den bros, token stoner chicks, and independent floaters – two exhibit distinct forms of gender reflexivity, a self-consciousness of gender investments, negotiations, and constraints as components of a socially constructed game rather than as biological imperatives. These two forms of gender reflexivity – which I call tactical resignation and emergent reflexivity – raise further questions about the capacity for inquiry and discourse to induce reflexivity and the experience of marginalized gender identities in other social fields.

  • Thumbnail for Commencement Program 1912
    Commencement Program 1912 by Colorado College

    Program of Colorado College Class of 1912 Commencement ceremony, June 12, 1912, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Includes program of Commencement events, June 6-12 (1 page); and the (22-page) text of the Commencement address by Henry McAllister, Jr., "The Responsibilities of Educated Citizenship."

  • Thumbnail for Commencement Program 1884 (with notes)
    Commencement Program 1884 (with notes) by Colorado College

    Program of Colorado College Class of 1884 Commencement ceremony, May 28, 1884, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado, with handwritten notes.