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121 hits

  • Thumbnail for BB19
    BB19

    This hypocrystalline thin section contains a trachytic groundmass of plagioclase laths, biotite needles, elongate strings of quartz, and serpentine pseudomorphs. The phenocrystic population consists of rounded quartz grains, often with a calcite rim, and concentrically-zoned, euhedral to subhedral plagioclase blocks. The plagioclase is being replaced in places by calcite, which is also found in fractures within the sample.

  • Thumbnail for BB18
    BB18

    This fine-grained granite contains abundant feldspars, many of which display concentric zoning from plagioclase cores to k-feldspar rims. Biotite grains are altering to and interfingered with chlorite. Rounded hornblende crystals are rare in this sample.

  • Thumbnail for BB14
    BB14

    Phenocrysts of resorbed plagioclase and k-feldspar give this otherwise glassy rock its porphyritic texture. A couple of resorbed pyroxene phenocrysts are present. Aligned needles of an opaque phase give the glassy groundmass a trachytic texture.

  • Thumbnail for SW9
    SW9

    This coarse-grained sample consists of equant, subhedral bronizite crystals with few large, anhedral plagioclase and augite crystals filling the interstices between grains.

  • Thumbnail for SW1A
    SW1A

    This coarse-grained ophitic norite contains intergrown plagioclase and orthopyroxene. Chlorite alteration of pyroxene is pervasive.

  • Thumbnail for BB3
    BB3

    Large, euhedral to subhedral plagioclase blocks are in far greater abundance than either k-feldspar or quartz, both of which are anhedral in shape. All the ferromagnesian phases are anhedral in shape and tend to cluster together. Hornblende growth is at the expense of clinopyroxene. Opaques cluster with the ferromagnesian phases. Quartz displays first-order yellows in this slightly thickened sample.

  • Thumbnail for 868
    868

    The coarseness of this granite obscures in thin section the graphic texture so evident in handsample. The feldspars contain inclusions of muscovite as well as zircon (or another like mineral) and untwinned grains are readily distinguished from quartz by the comprehensive dusting of clay minerals due to weathering.

  • Thumbnail for Bs
    Bs

    The outer rim of this bomb is glassy with vesicles and augite and olivine phenocrysts. Small, widely dispersed plagioclase microlites are also present. The core of the bomb contains a porous aggregate of fragmental quartz held together by glass.

  • Thumbnail for Bm
    Bm

    The outer rim of this bomb is glassy with vesicles and augite and olivine phenocrysts. Small, widely dispersed plagioclase microlites are also present. The core of the bomb contains a porous aggregate of fragmental quartz held together by glass.

  • Thumbnail for SC-20
    SC-20

    The glassy groundmass contains small plagiocase and clinopyroxene crystals, both of which are found as microphenocrysts. Plagioclase grains are variable in size and subhedral in shape. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts are substaniatlly larger, often due to the formation of glomeroporphyroclasts.

  • Thumbnail for PS-2a-pgr
    PS-2a-pgr

    A granitic inequigranular diorite with graphically intergrown, sericitized k-feldspar and quartz, and chloritized hornblende. Clinozoisite and sphene are accessory minerals found throughout the thin section.

  • Thumbnail for 62-K-91
    62-K-91

    Plagioclase laths in this thin section have a continuous gradation in size from groundmass to phenocrysts. Most are euhedral in shape and this phase makes up roughly 70-80% of the minerals in this sample. Subhedral clinopyroxene makes up the remaining 20-30% of the minerals. The larger, blocky plagioclase is locally zoned and a sieve texture is observable in some grains.

  • Thumbnail for SC-5-BL
    SC-5-BL

    The groundmass of glass and plagioclase microlites is host to euhedral phenocrysts of three euhedral mineral phases, plagioclase, hornblende, and biotite.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-9
    JPN-9

    The crystals in this thin section look somewhat out of equilibrium with the melt. The groundmass is microcrystalline and riddled with plagioclase and pyroxenes, as well as glass. Crystals of the phenocryst population are generally subhedral, with rounded corners and irregular twins. The pyroxenes are frequently rimmed by pyroxenes of differing composition. Plagioclase phenocrysts are of differing generations; the first has cloudy, inclusion-rich cores with fresh rims and the second lacks this core. Both may be concentrically zoned. The pyroxenes in particular tend to cluster in glomeroporphyroclasts. The occasional granular aggregate of calcite can be observed in this sample.

  • Thumbnail for SC-21
    SC-21

    This thin section is comprised entirely of glass and aligned plagioclase microlites. A few hematite nodules are found throughout. One weathered biotite phenocrysts can be seen.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-6
    JPN-6

    Plagioclase is a much more abundant member of the groundmass in this basal than many other basalts in this suite. It, along with two pyroxene phases, comprise the poikilitic, subhedral phenocryst population. Plucking of both phases disrupts the quality of the thin section.

  • Thumbnail for KBR2
    KBR2

    The dominant texture in this gabbro is an ophitic intergrowth of equant plagioclase laths within larger, subhedral, clinopyroxene grains. Alteration of some phases to chlorite, talc and iddingsite is localized and occurs more in non-ophitic sections of the rock.

  • Thumbnail for KBR1
    KBR1

    The dominant texture in this gabbro is an ophitic intergrowth of equant plagioclase laths within larger, subhedral, clinopyroxene grains. Alteration of some phases to chlorite, talc and clays is localized and occurs more in non-ophitic sections of the rock.

  • Thumbnail for JPN-5
    JPN-5

    Based on grain size, two populations of pyroxenes and plagioclase exist in this sample; the first are the fine-grained, equant crystals of the glassy groundmass, and the second, the subhedral to anhedral phenocrysts visible in handsample. The inconsistently-shaped plagioclase grains are sometimes zoned and frequently contain inclusions of glass.

  • Thumbnail for SC-7A-BL
    SC-7A-BL

    The groundmass of this porphyritic basalt is predominantly glass with less abundant plagioclase microlites. The most readily-identifiable mineral of the phenocryst population is plagioclase. Of greater abundance are euhedral, opaque pseudomorphs. Rare inclusions of pyroxene are observed within these opaques. Pockets of chalcedony disrupt the otherwise uniform groundmass.

  • Thumbnail for AGUNG PMC
    AGUNG PMC

    The high quantity of vesicles in this thin section keep the phenocrysts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine well separated. While the clinopyroxene is euhedral in shape, the other two phases are more subhedral. Plagioclase phenocrysts have a sieve texture. The groundmass is mostly glass, with a few, moderately sized grains of plagioclase.

  • Thumbnail for 6
    6

    The three essential felsic species occur in two sizes. The larger plaioclases are euhedral and zoned and are pheocrysts, in places glomeroporphritic. A few large subhedral kaolinized orthoclase grains are present as are large quartz anhedra. These are set in a poorly defined groundmass of variable grained quartz, orthoclase, plagioclase, biotite, and hornblende. Of these the mafics are subhedral, the plagioclase is euhedral, and the others anhedral. Hornblende, more strongly altered than biotite, is variably colored in pale green, bluish green and buff. It is replaced by chlorite and epidote. Accessories are magnetite, apatite, sphene and zircon.

  • Thumbnail for ERB-12
    ERB-12

    This two-pyroxene, hornblende-bearing gabbro is highly fractured and has a much finer-grained population of pyroxenes growing in the interstices between larger pyroxene grains. A thin band of finer-grained pyroxne and plagioclase cross-cuts the sample.

  • Thumbnail for BB29
    BB29

    The four phenocrystic phases in this thin section all display disequilibrium textures. Tabular plagioclase pheoncrysts are oscillatorily-zoned at the core and surrounded by as many as three distinct, cloudy, inclusion-rich rims. Quartz phenocrysts are rounded by resorbtion; thick coronas of calcite and hematite pepper, though do not entirely replace, their rims. Relict biotite phenocrysts, pseudomorphed by an opaque phase, are recognized more readily by the consistant rectancular and hexagonal shape than by the rare inclusion of the residual 'host'. These grains, frequently clustered together, have thick black rims and are sometimes infilled with a calcite-like mineral. This calcite-like mineral, frequently found replacing the biotite and as part of the quartz phenocryst coronas, is also observed pseudomorphing a tabular-shaped mineral found both as a phenocryst and part of the groundmass. The calcite seems to be replacing rectangular serpentine phenocrysts, presumably, pyroxene pseudomorphs themselves. The trachytic groundmass consists predominantly of microlites of plagioclase, prismatic opaques, glass, and the periodic rectangular calcite pseudomorph. Granular hematite veins cross-cut the thin section.

  • Thumbnail for CF1B
    CF1B

    The olivine phenocrysts in this vesicular basalt are unaltered, in contrast to the second phenocrystic phase, plagioclase, which has a speckled, mottled alteration texture encroaching concentrically inwards from the grain boundaries. Only the cores and a thin corona of plagioclase on the outermost edges of the phenocrysts remains unaltered by this opaque phase. The glassy groundmass contains of unoriented plagioclase microlites and tiny olivine crystals. Olivine phenocrysts are smaller and less abundant in CF1B than CF1A. Plucking of olivine crystals is extensive.