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  • Thumbnail for The Value of Collaborative Learning at a Liberal Arts College
    The Value of Collaborative Learning at a Liberal Arts College by Benedict, Elizabeth Helen

    This research investigated the value of collaborative work in a first year experience (FYE) course at Colorado College, a liberal arts college located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Three different questionnaires were administered to students, through an online survey in three phases. The results indicated students value collaboration because of the opportunities provided to interact with diverse people, expand their perspectives, and work efficiently with others. This research exemplifies the importance of collaborative abilities, which are skills valued by liberal arts colleges, future employers, and college students. Furthermore, this research identifies how the academic environment at Colorado College provides a context where successful collaborative learning can take place. Recommendations from this research are specific to the FYE program at Colorado College. Improvement would start with the FYE program identifying the value and role of collaborative work at Colorado College and beyond. With this recognition, the FYE program can intentionally shape students’ collaborative work experiences, which will help students to succeed at Colorado College and beyond. The recommendations from this research provide specific ways for the FYE program at Colorado College to improve students’ collaborative work experiences and learning.

  • Thumbnail for Semester, trimester or block plan? Retention of economics principles by undergraduates on alternative curricular structures
    Semester, trimester or block plan? Retention of economics principles by undergraduates on alternative curricular structures by Taylor, Corrine H. , Lybecker, Kristina M. , Johnson, Daniel K. N.

    This paper investigates whether the curricular structure of an Economics course (semester, trimester, or compressed block schedule) has an effect on an undergraduate's subsequent retention of course material. We test separately for theoretical/process comprehension and for graphical construction/interpretation, while separating micro from macro content as well. We use an instrument to address the no stakes testing problem, and our Heckman two-stage estimations present some interesting results for educators and institutional policymakers alike.