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  • Thumbnail for 2010-2011 Speaker series: Are our forests dying? Forest health in the Rockies
    2010-2011 Speaker series: Are our forests dying? Forest health in the Rockies

    Presents list of lectures for the 2010-11 Colorado College State of the Rockies speaker series: Are the trees falling? How pine beetle and wildfire shape Rocky Mountain forests / Dave Theobald, Jason Sibold -- Big burn: the lasting legacy of the nation’s largest wildfire / Timothy Egan -- The White is turning red: case study of the White River National Forest / Tony Dixon, Jan Burke -- Colorado State Government & forests: controversy over health, climate and roads / Mike King, Nolan Doesken -- Environmental groups and public involvement in forest health decisions / Suzanne Jones, Sloan Shoemaker -- Private solutions: ownership, philosophy, management.

  • Thumbnail for 2007 Fall wilderness/wildlands speaker series
    2007 Fall wilderness/wildlands speaker series

    Presents list of lectures for the Fall 2007 Colorado College State of the Rockies speaker series: Wilderness and wildlands: is there enough? / Will Rogers, Suzanne Jones -- Designated wilderness: what’s the status? / Peter Landres -- The unprotected wildlands/roadless areas: how should they be managed? / Gloria Flora -- What is the value of wilderness? / William Cronan.

  • Thumbnail for Wildfire severity effects on in-stream large wood in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, Idaho
    Wildfire severity effects on in-stream large wood in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, Idaho by Stauffer-Norris, Will A.

    Large wood (LW) provides habitat to aquatic organisms and can significantly alter stream geomorphology. Sources of LW to stream ecosystem originate in riparian forests and are influenced by wildfire regimes. To quantify the relationship between burn severities and in-stream LW, we surveyed 15 low order streams effected by varying wildfire burn severities in a near-pristine watershed of the Frank Church River of No-Return Wilderness in Central Idaho. In the field and using remotely sensed imagery, burn severity was divided into four categories: “unburned,” “low,” “moderate,” and “high”. We hypothesized that burn severity would be positively correlated with in-stream LW. Alternatively, in areas with the highest burn severities, LW might be limited due to combustion. To test this hypothesis we used principal components analysis that indicated fire severity, recruitable LW, and pre-fire vegetation are the most important predictors of in-stream LW in landscapes with a natural wildfire regime. In particular, high category severity burns had significantly more LW than the other categories. An increase in burn severity is also correlated with increased average piece size. The comparison of fire severity maps to field data found a significant correlation locally but no correlation with fire severity of upstream reaches. Few studies have compared the interaction of in-stream LW and fire severity in a near-pristine stream ecosystem. The results of this study improve our understanding of LW dynamics in Intermountain West watersheds with a natural wildfire regime, and could inform post-fire salvage logging management practices.

  • Thumbnail for "A self-discovery adventure" : the influence of American wilderness on Hmong refugee identity formation
    "A self-discovery adventure" : the influence of American wilderness on Hmong refugee identity formation by Hedlund, Rachel

    Although there is an emerging body of literature on ethnic groups and natural resource use in America, there is not much research regarding specific ethnic groups and their interactions with the American wilderness. This thesis explores the relationship between the American social constructions of wilderness and a specific refugee population in America—the Hmong people. Interviews were conducted with participants in the Twin Cities of Minnesota with conversations focusing on identity and wilderness interactions. These interviews revealed that the Hmong, a Southeast Asian people with a deeply rooted connection to nature interact with the wilderness in ways that differ from the American norm. Yet, through segmented assimilation, younger generations of Hmong have also acculturated to the American perception of wilderness as a place of self-discovery.