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  • Thumbnail for The Relevance of “Story-Truth” in the Telling of War Stories
    The Relevance of “Story-Truth” in the Telling of War Stories by Franco, Alejandra Anna-Alisia

    In the novel The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien utilizes metafiction to explore the idea of truth in war stories. O’Brien created two types of truth that are used for storytelling: the happening-truth and the story-truth. The happening truth refers to what actually happened in a story and the story-truth is a dramatized version of what actually happened in the story. Storytellers often utilize story-truth to convey the experience, rather than the just the events, to the audience. O’Brien hints to an interesting relationship and positive feedback loop between the audience and the storyteller which could ultimately cause the storyteller to utilize story-truth rather than the happening-truth. Using this lens, the war stories contained within The Odyssey and The Aeneid were analyzed to see how well the idea of story-truth vs. happening-truth as well as the relationship between the audience and storyteller were present. This analysis makes it apparent that all three of these war stories (Aeneas’, Odysseus’, and O’Brien’s) share much more in common than originally thought.

  • Thumbnail for The Relevance of “Story-Truth” in the Telling of War Stories
    The Relevance of “Story-Truth” in the Telling of War Stories by Franco, Alejandra Anna-Alisia

    In the novel The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien utilizes metafiction to explore the idea of truth in war stories. O’Brien created two types of truth that are used for storytelling: the happening-truth and the story-truth. The happening truth refers to what actually happened in a story and the story-truth is a dramatized version of what actually happened in the story. Storytellers often utilize story-truth to convey the experience, rather than the just the events, to the audience. O’Brien hints to an interesting relationship and positive feedback loop between the audience and the storyteller which could ultimately cause the storyteller to utilize story-truth rather than the happening-truth. Using this lens, the war stories contained within The Odyssey and The Aeneid were analyzed to see how well the idea of story-truth vs. happening-truth as well as the relationship between the audience and storyteller were present. This analysis makes it apparent that all three of these war stories (Aeneas’, Odysseus’, and O’Brien’s) share much more in common than originally thought.