Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

6 hits

  • Thumbnail for U.S. trade barriers and female employment in the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry
    U.S. trade barriers and female employment in the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry by Keating, Madeline

    With the rise of industrialization in developing countries, the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry has taken off in the last 40 years. With this rise in textile and garment factories, women have been able to participate with much more volume in the Bangladeshi economy because approximately 90% of garment workers in Bangladesh are females. The United States has consistently put import duties on Bangladeshi textile and garment goods higher than those of almost every other LDC, thus affecting the competitive nature of Bangladesh's number one GDP generator; apparel and textiles. This thesis aims to look at the effect that the high US tariff rates on Bangladesh's ready-made garments have on the female employment rate in the Bangladeshi garment factories

  • Thumbnail for Navajo weaver, San Juan District: D86
    Navajo weaver, San Juan District: D86

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: D87

  • Thumbnail for Navajo weaver, blanket of unusual design: D87
    Navajo weaver, blanket of unusual design: D87

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: D87

  • Thumbnail for Navajo weaver, good loom.  One of the best weavers in S.E. Utah. 1908: D85
    Navajo weaver, good loom. One of the best weavers in S.E. Utah. 1908: D85

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: D85

  • Thumbnail for Tschindi (Devil) Blanket. 1915: D82
    Tschindi (Devil) Blanket. 1915: D82

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: D82

  • Thumbnail for Weaving a Web of Understanding: Navajo Textiles
    Weaving a Web of Understanding: Navajo Textiles by Heiss, Frances Peterson

    This work explores Navajo textiles using an inter-disciplinary approach combining different lenses and methods, including environmental history, a discussion of frontier commerce, museum studies, and immersion in culture through weaving samples and traveling to a weaving community in New Mexico. The combination of these approaches provided a better understanding of Navajo weaving rather than simply focusing on a single aspect.