Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

7 hits

  • Thumbnail for The catalyst [2015-2016 v. 46 no. 6 Oct. 9]
  • Thumbnail for How population density affects innovation in technology
    How population density affects innovation in technology by Groves, Timothy

    Innovation is a tough element to measure. It is a very strong asset to have in the business world, and businesses will do anything to get it. Innovation is a key component in technological advancement. It is difficult to determine what factors affect a particular areas innovation level. In this study, population density and other variables were examined in order to determine their affect on patent production in different cities and towns. Though population is a strong factor in regional innovation, there are other determining factors as well.

  • Thumbnail for BOARD GENDER DIVERSITY AND ITS EFFECTS ON CSR PERFORMANCE IN THE MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY, RETAIL, AND APPAREL INDUSTRIES
    BOARD GENDER DIVERSITY AND ITS EFFECTS ON CSR PERFORMANCE IN THE MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY, RETAIL, AND APPAREL INDUSTRIES by Bilgi, Hamiyyet

    This paper investigates CSR ratings among firms that have varying corporate board gender compositions within the media, technology, retail and apparel industries in the United States. An empirical model is used to investigate whether the percentage of women board of directors has a substantial effect on a company’s CSR performance, whether or not these differences vary by industry, and if a critical mass of women shifts these results. The conclusions of the paper relied on data from Thomson Reuter’s ASSET4, Spencer Stuarts Annual Indices, and individual financial reports of firms. The analysis provides evidence that there a positive relationship between board gender composition and CSR ratings and that there are some industry level differences but the presence of a critical mass of women does not have a significant impact.

  • Thumbnail for Chinese competition : who's to blame for the deindustrialization of America?
    Chinese competition : who's to blame for the deindustrialization of America? by Pagan, Russell

    Current legislation seeks to label China a “currency manipulator” due to its allegedly unfair trade practices. The coincidence of increased Sino-US trade flows with domestic job loss in manufacturing fuels a great deal of the growing anti-China sentiment in the US. Proponents of the Exchange Rate Oversight Reform Act attribute America’s long-experienced decline in manufacturing employment to competition from rising Chinese imports, therefore advocating protectionist measures. This thesis examines the validity of such claims, suggesting the possible significance of technologically-induced productivity gains rather than increased trade liberalization. Employing an ordinary least squares regression model, this study tests for the determinants of manufacturing job-loss between 1983 and 2005. Results of this study indicate the significance not only of increased imports from China, but from the entirety of the US’s low-wage trading partners. However, negligible significance is attributed to enhanced productivity during this period.

  • Thumbnail for Movement
    Movement by Densmore, Eliza

    A portrayal of the conflicting and confusing roles of technology and nature in the 21st century, using only music and the moving image.

  • Thumbnail for Co-teaching relationships among librarians and other information professionals
    Co-teaching relationships among librarians and other information professionals by Shannon, Amy W. , Medaille, Ann

    This article uses the co-teaching experiences of workshop instructors at the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries as a basis for an in-depth exploration of the factors that lead to successful co-teaching arrangements among librarians and other information professionals. The experiences of these instructors demonstrate that co-teaching can provide numerous benefits: It can enhance the learning experience for students, it can provide a method for refining teaching skills, it can promote successful collaborations across departments, and it can bring innovative ideas into the classroom. Drawing on collaboration research from the Wilder Foundation, this study found that successful co-teaching relationships are characterized by factors related to environment, partnerships, process and structure, communication, purpose, resources, and external/long-term considerations. Within these seven areas, guidelines for successful co-teaching relationships have been formulated for use by librarians and other information professionals.

  • Thumbnail for You are not a gadget : the undiscovered continents of human potential
    You are not a gadget : the undiscovered continents of human potential by Lanier, Jaron

    Jaron Lanier - scientist, author, musician, and artist - visits campus to ruminate on "media technology as a grand exploration of unimagined human potential." Combining elements of cognition, Microsoft's XBOX, chemistry, and musical improvisation, among other things, Lanier takes us on a journey into the possibilities, pitfalls, and potential of New Media. This event was sponsored by Colorado College Department of Drama and Dance, Mellon Fund, Colorado College Cultural Attractions Fund, Colorado College Dean of Students Office, Colorado College President's Office, and NEH Professorship. This lecture celebrating the Cornerstone Arts Week Initiative was presented at Colorado College, Richard F. Celeste Theatre, February 8, 2012.