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  • Thumbnail for The catalyst [2015-2016 v. 46 no. 20 April 1]
  • Thumbnail for Hungary and the concerns of measuring sustainability
    Hungary and the concerns of measuring sustainability by Kóbori, Ádám

    For the last ten years, the words ‘sustainability’ and ‘sustainable development’ have been used by many prominent political and economic leaders. But what is sustainability really and is it possible to accurately measure the sustainability of countries’ economies objectively? This study focuses on three sustainability models, namely the Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI), the Sustainability Assessment by Fuzzy Evaluation (SAFE) and the Sustainable Human Carrying Capacity (SHCC), and their evaluations on the sustainability of the Hungarian economy and environment. Furthermore, it also surveys the opinion of Hungarian undergraduate economics students on the Hungarian economy and its sustainability. The study shows that the ability of current sustainability models and measures to give accurate portrayals of countries and regions is problematic, because they use different definitions of sustainability, use different environmental and/or economic indicators, do not differentiate between the impacts of the individual indicators, and are able to be used for political purposes. This is especially true for Hungary, as the country’s economy is crumbling with increasing social unrest, yet sustainability models give it a high ranking. Also, the Hungarian students’ views on the country’s sustainability depend on what school of economics they were taught in, and what they think about Hungary’s past, current and future economic and environmental situation.

  • Thumbnail for Determinants of college value : does sustainability matter?
    Determinants of college value : does sustainability matter? by Berghoff, Anna Lauren

    This paper investigates the determinants of college value. For the purposes of this study, college value is measured by college rank. This study aims to find out which determinants are most significant and whether sustainability impacts college rank. In order to test the different variables, an ordinary least squares regression technique and a negative binomial count model were used. Results from the regressions indicate that the constant, the year, the academic reputation score, the student selectivity rank, the faculty resources rank, the graduation and retention rank, the alumni giving rank, the financial resources rank, and the endowment per student are the most significant determinants of college rank. Sustainability appears to be insignificant.

  • Thumbnail for Development in Central America : from the World Bank to sustainability
    Development in Central America : from the World Bank to sustainability by Chenoweth, Rebecca Anne

    This thesis hypothesizes that current economic and social development strategies promoted by the World Bank in Central America are economically and environmentally unsustainable. Thus, the region should shift to implementing sustainable development strategies, such as sustainable agriculture, alterative energy sources, increased education, environmental justice, and region-specific development to reduce inequalities and environmental degradation in the region. The thesis presents data about current economic and social conditions in the six countries. The World Bank is analyzed because it remains the primary economic development agency in Central America. The history of the organization and impacts on the region are analyzed. Finally, examples of sustainable alternatives from Latin America are presented as viable options for Central America.

  • Thumbnail for The catalyst [2015-2016 v. 46 no. 12 Dec. 11]
  • Thumbnail for Promoting residential renewable energy adoption
    Promoting residential renewable energy adoption by Nordblom, Crosby Van Curan

    As society has progressed over time, we have developed extensive unsustainable consumption habits, and we will have to deal with the future consequences of those actions. Problems, like climate change, have developed into intricate issues that will require innovative marketing and promotion methods, as they will involve the alteration of solidified social patterns and constructs. Through analyzing products like residential renewable energy, we can better understand how sustainable and responsible behavior can be fostered from the individual level to a national scale. That is why this study asks what factors explain homeowners’ decision to invest in renewable energy? Through exploring past research, understanding current markets, and surveying potential and current renewable energy user, this study attempts to identify the most prominent barriers and effective promoters of residential renewable energy.

  • Thumbnail for 2007 Colorado College State of the Rockies conference
    2007 Colorado College State of the Rockies conference

    Program for the Colorado College State of the Rockies Conference held April 9 through April 11, 2007. Includes listings of presentations and speakers: Water Sustainability, with David Havlick, Tyler McMahon (CC class of 2007), Melinda Kassen, Gary Bostrom; Keynote speaker, Kay Brothers; Forest Health, with Brian Linkhart, Carissa Look (CC class of 2007), Merrill Kaufmann, Mary Mitsos, Phillip Kannan (CC distinguished lecturer); Keynote speaker, James Hubbard; New Communities/New Urbanism, with Ruth Kolarik (CC professor of art), Chris Jackson (CC class of 2006), Mark Johnson, Mark Tremmel; Keynote speaker, Peter Calthorpe.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College 2014 State of Sustainability : an annual assessment report
    Colorado College 2014 State of Sustainability : an annual assessment report by Biggar, Lily, co-author , Johnson, Ian, co-author

    The 2014 Colorado College State of Sustainability report benchmarks our campus’ performance across broad sustainability metrics and provides a road map for incremental improvement in the coming years. More importantly, it recommends specific strategies for a holistic systems approach to successful integration of educational, engagement, operational, and planning outcomes. This report utilizes the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS®) outline and assessment methods developed by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) to address the integration of sustainability across campus and the community. A focus on the Priority Actions not only impacts sustainability across campus and makes us more applicable as an institution of higher education to the current generation, but it also maps ways to improve our overall STARS® score and standing as well as other ranking systems, such as the Princeton Review Guide to Green Colleges and Sierra Magazine’s Coolest School rankings. To this end, the 2014 Colorado College State of Sustainability report is fundamentally organized around the STARS® organizational outline. CC’s 2014 benchmark report can be found at: https://stars.aashe.org/institutions/colorado-college-co/report/

  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 2 October 5]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 2 October 5] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on October 5, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for The catalyst [2014-2015 v. 45 no. 1 Sept. 5]
    The catalyst [2014-2015 v. 45 no. 1 Sept. 5]

    The Catalyst is the weekly student newspaper of Colorado College. This issue was published September 9, 2014.

  • Thumbnail for The catalyst [2015-2016 v. 46 no. 9 Nov. 6]
  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2017-2018 v.48 no.4 Sept. 29]
  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 1 September 7]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 1 September 7] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on September 7, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 7 March 28]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 7 March 28] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on March 28, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 3 November 2]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 3 November 2] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on November 2, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Land management plan : The Colorado College Baca campus
    Land management plan : The Colorado College Baca campus by Native Landscape Solutions , Colorado College

    "Colorado College's Campus at Baca is located on approximately 300 acres near the town of Crestone, Colorado, along the west side of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Its buildings are situated primarily adjacent to the South Crestone Creek drainage. Several different vegetation zones exist within these 300 acres, including a narrowleaf cottonwood/rocky mountain juniper riparian zone, a shrub/grassland zone, and a pinyon/juniper/ponderosa zone. Within each zone there are different fire regimes, elemental balances, and biodiversities. This land management plan is designed to be adaptive in nature, and reflect sensitivity to each zone."--Introduction p. 3

  • Thumbnail for The catalyst [2015-2016 v. 46 no. 5 Oct. 2]
  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2016-2017 v.47 no. 1 Sept. 2]
  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2016-2017 v.47 no. 4 Sept. 30]
  • Thumbnail for fourteen
    fourteen

    In January 2009, Colorado College undertook a campus-wide conservation campaign. The campaign aCClimate 14, challenged the campus community to cut energy use, water use and waste by 14% in 14 weeks. The theme of the campaign was: 14 weeks. 14 habits. 14 percent.

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College Office of Sustainability
    Colorado College Office of Sustainability

    A look at the newly created physical space of the Colorado College Office of Sustainability. A few of the six interns give an overview of their duties within the department.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 4 November 30]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 4 November 30] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on November 30, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 6 February 22]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2011-2012 Block 6 February 22] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on February 22, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2012-2013 Block 2 October 3]
    Campus Sustainability Council minutes [2012-2013 Block 2 October 3] by Colorado College

    Minutes of the Colorado College Campus Sustainability Council meeting held on October 3, 2012.

  • Thumbnail for Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum :  building alliances to support a paradigm shift
    Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum : building alliances to support a paradigm shift by Charney, Madeleine

    Sustainability is a fast evolving movement in higher education demonstrated by a proliferation of academic programs, co-curricular initiatives, and campus projects. Sustainability is now viewed as vital to the mission of many institutions of higher education, creating a paradigm shift that librarians can help advance with their collective interdisciplinary expertise. A review of LibGuides (online resource guides) showed that academic librarians are involved with sustainability efforts on many campuses and have a role in shaping curriculum-related activities. The author administered a survey to creators of sustainability LibGuides during the spring of 2011, posting the survey on library listservs as well. Librarians returned 112 survey responses that illustrated their engagement in sustainability activities through the forging of campus partnerships with administrators, faculty, staff from the Office of Sustainability, and library colleagues. Telephone interviews conducted with 24 of the respondents showed librarians’ wide-ranging professional interest in sustainability, and their initiatives to promote its cause, including creating resources, collections, exhibits, and events; library instruction; co-teaching with faculty; serving on sustainability committees; and collaborating with sustainability faculty and staff. However, both the survey and the interviews suggest that librarians would benefit from increased collaboration and knowledge of work undertaken elsewhere. Moreover, as the needs of students and faculty studying sustainability increase, libraries need to appoint librarians with special responsibilities in this field. Included is the author’s experience as the Sustainability Studies Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and her engagement in professional development activities related to sustainability. Best practices for librarians to advance sustainability efforts are offered.