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124 hits

  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - Instructions for worship at a shrine
    Ikuta Jinja - Instructions for worship at a shrine

    This sign instructs those (probably of younger generations) who need a reminder how to worship (from right to left): "First you bow twice with back bent to ninety degrees and head lowered. Then you clap your hands twice at chest level. Then bow one last time."

  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - An ema with a wish
    Ikuta Jinja - An ema with a wish

    This ema, written in an accomplished calligraphic style, reads, " For the curing of illness -- [Name] -- December 26, 1957. Please, somehow, help."

  • Thumbnail for Religion in public
    Religion in public

    People leave offerings for the spirits during the Hungry Ghost Festival along public sidewalks.

  • Thumbnail for A celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival sign
    A celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival sign

    A celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival sign

  • Thumbnail for Honoring spirits in public places
    Honoring spirits in public places

    The spirits can visit this shopping center to obtain offerings.

  • Thumbnail for Setting offerings
    Setting offerings

    This woman is adding more offerings to this collection.

  • Thumbnail for Effects of Burnt Offerings
    Effects of Burnt Offerings

    The ashes of the burnt offerings are covering the grass.

  • Thumbnail for Shinto shrine, Shichigosan Day, Hachiman Shrine, Morioka
    Shinto shrine, Shichigosan Day, Hachiman Shrine, Morioka

    As described in image 000058, this young boy has been brought to the Hachiman Shrine in Morioka, for the celebration of Shichigosan, Seven-five-three Day, when prayers are offered for the good fortune of girls who are seven or three years old and for boys who are five years old. This young lad, hoping that his father takes the photo quickly, because the sun in his eyes is bright, is dressed in his best formal traditional dress.

  • Thumbnail for Printed fortunes and prayers, omikuji, at Shinto shrine
    Printed fortunes and prayers, omikuji, at Shinto shrine

    These are folded pieces of paper with printed fortunes or prayers on them, obtained at the local shrine. They are tied here and left at the Shinto shrine in the hope that the kami of the shrine will help to make the fortune come true or help to fulfill the prayer.

  • Thumbnail for Muroji, 018,  Kanjodo, Initiation Hall, detail, front exterior
    Muroji, 018, Kanjodo, Initiation Hall, detail, front exterior

    Detail of the central bay of the Kanjodo at Muroji, showing part of the public portion of the hall. Included in the photo are the large vessel in which one may place a stick of lighted incense, the wooden offeratory box to the right of the incense vessel, and the container of sticks for fortunes on the right (see image ecasia000035).

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child, weighing baskets for ritual
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child, weighing baskets for ritual

    These two metal baskets used for the child weighing ritual are connected by a thick rope positioned over the strong limb of a tree in the courtyard of the dargah. [For description of the ritual, see cbind0043.]

  • Thumbnail for Aurangzeb Mosque, Qur'anic inscription
    Aurangzeb Mosque, Qur'anic inscription

    Passages from the Qur'an are used as decorations and as reminders of the presence of God in homes and in public places, as well as in mosques.

  • Thumbnail for Qawwali, impromptu afternoon performance
    Qawwali, impromptu afternoon performance

    A senior qawwali singer is joined by other men to sing qawwals in praise of God, the Prophet, and Sufi saints. This was an impromptu qawwali performed with men who happened to be at the dargah.

  • Thumbnail for Bhajan singing 2
    Bhajan singing 2

    As noted in the description for Bhajan singing 1, audience members as well as singers are wrapped in woolen shawls enjoying the devotional songs in the winter night air.

  • Thumbnail for Shinto shrine customs
    Shinto shrine customs

    Left corner: Shinto priest offering prayers of celebration (norito) to the gods. Right: Fires to be used at shrines is created the natural way. Top: Miko (shrine maidens) originally played an intercessionary role between man and the dieties, reaying the divine will. Here they assist a wedding.

  • Thumbnail for View of the Earth - detail
    View of the Earth - detail

    Colored ink or paint on paper, 12 3/4 inch circle. Detail of interior circle with inscription describing the various 'seas' that move outward from the central image.

  • Thumbnail for Ikuta Jinja - Fortunes tied onto branches
    Ikuta Jinja - Fortunes tied onto branches

    Just outside the main entrance gate is a makeshift tree (constructed because the natural tree was full!) of long, thin hanging wooden dowels, on which many white paper fortune strips (mikuji) are folded.

  • Thumbnail for Pilgrims in front of the Great Pagoda
    Pilgrims in front of the Great Pagoda

    The Great Pagoda (Daito) is the most striking structure within the Garan complex in the western central part of Koyasan. The pagoda stands over 150 feet tall (48.5 meters). These pilgrims, who travel as a group in their white garb and are accompanied by priests in black robes, pray before the entrance of the pagoda toward the huge Buddha images inside.

  • Thumbnail for Setting the stage
    Setting the stage

    Two men are setting this stage for the celebration of the Hungry Ghost festival.

  • Thumbnail for Helping the Spirits
    Helping the Spirits

    Three men burn paper offerings during the Hungry Ghost Festival

  • Thumbnail for Fresh fruit
    Fresh fruit

    Fresh fruit is offered to the spirits.

  • Thumbnail for Burning barrel
    Burning barrel

    This man is preparing to burn paper offerings.

  • Thumbnail for Printed fortunes left at a temple as prayers
    Printed fortunes left at a temple as prayers

    A printed prayer or fortune, an omikuji , obtained at a shrine or a temple, may be tied to a line or, often, to a branch, in effect, as a prayer to the deity of the shrine or temple, seeking their aid in bringing it true. This line of such fortunes is at Muroji, a Buddhist temple in the countryside in Nara Prefecture. Although they are most commonly seen at Shinto shrines, this group is at a Buddhist temple. Keywords: omikuji , fortune see also: ecasia000035, 000059

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child

    At this shrine, couples pray to the saint, Zar Zari Zar Baksh, for his help in conceiving a healthy child. When the child is old enough, the couples promise tol return and make an offering of thanksgiving. This ritual consists of distributing sweetbreads equal in weight to that of the child. To determine this weight, two metal crates are balanced by a rope hanging over the limb of a large tree in the courtyard of the dargah. Often travelling from great distances, families dress in their finest clothes and bring many family members to share in this festive celebratory ritual.

  • Thumbnail for Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child, child sitting in the balance
    Zar Zari Zar Baksh Dargah, ritual of thanksgiving for child, child sitting in the balance

    This child in her finest dress and blud scarf sits patiently in the metal crate of the balance as she is weighed against the bags of sweetbreads to be distributed to the community. Following a custom widely practiced in all religious communities in South Asia, the girl, as the primary participant in the ritual, wears a garland of fresh flowers.