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6 hits

  • Thumbnail for Seated Female
    Seated Female

    12 cm x 9 cm. Polychrome painting of unidentified seated female, medallion from larger painting in opaque watercolors on cotton (thanka paubha in Nepalese script at bottom left) red ground, badly abraded figure, segment of circular border at right, mounted on mat board.

  • Thumbnail for Four puppets
    Four puppets

    Four unidentified Wayang Golek puppets. Two are male, one is female.

  • Thumbnail for Seventh hall of hell
    Seventh hall of hell

    The King of Taishan is the judge portrayed here. Shows people gaining merit such as the person saving ants from a river and releasing a snake. The main hell featured is Sword Mountain. One also sees Oxhead, a common torturer in hell. Purchased in 1982 in Taiwan.

  • Thumbnail for Fourth hall of hell
    Fourth hall of hell

    One of a series of ten hell scrolls. Shows the King of the Five Offices and his henchman as well as several of the hells under his control. Commonly seen in Taiwanese temples. Purchased in the early 1980's in Taiwan.

  • Thumbnail for Balinese male figure
    Balinese male figure

    Part of a set;These are small statues known as pretima or pratima in Bali that likely date to the mid-twentieth century. Such objects are preserved in small temple shrines and taken out in procession on festival occasions. Their specific identities are iconographically unmarked. They are known only through context, community memory and ritual use. On occasions of temple renovation a Brahmana priest sometimes ritually repaints pretima. The male figure appears to have been repainted in this way and the female figure has not. This explains its relatively crude painting by contrast to the more refined painting on the female figure, which would have been done by an artisan at the time of its production.

  • Thumbnail for Balinese female figure
    Balinese female figure

    Part of a set;These are small statues known as pretima or pratima in Bali that likely date to the mid-twentieth century. Such objects are preserved in small temple shrines and taken out in procession on festival occasions. Their specific identities are iconographically unmarked. They are known only through context, community memory and ritual use. On occasions of temple renovation a Brahmana priest sometimes ritually repaints pretima. The male figure appears to have been repainted in this way and the female figure has not. This explains its relatively crude painting by contrast to the more refined painting on the female figure, which would have been done by an artisan at the time of its production.