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13 hits

  • Thumbnail for Palm Sunday
    Palm Sunday by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 4/100, 34 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches. There are 57 examples of the stencil-prints (kappazuri) of Watanabe Sadao in the Brauer Museum of Art. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for The Good Samaritan
    The Good Samaritan by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 39/70, 26 x 22 3/4 inches. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for The Last Supper
    The Last Supper by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 11/80, 24 x 28 inches. There are 57 examples of the stencil-prints (kappazuri) of Watanabe Sadao in the Brauer Museum of Art. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for Adam and Eve
    Adam and Eve by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 16/100, 27 x 20 inches. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that: "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe. (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). Institutions that list examples of his work in their collections include the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Christmas cakes
    Christmas cakes

    Although the percentage of Christians in Japan is miniscule, most Japanese still get into the spirit. These cakes are just one way to celebrate.

  • Thumbnail for Battle of Lepanto, Detail B
    Battle of Lepanto, Detail B

    See the Battle of Lepanto screen description, soc000618

  • Thumbnail for The Last Supper
    The Last Supper by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 13 x 9 inches. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.

  • Thumbnail for Jesus and Woman
    Jesus and Woman by Watanabe, Sadao (b. 1913)

    25.5 x 20.5' inches. Silk screen print of Jesus washing a woman's feet. Black, yellow, green, and white printed on red tissue paper.

  • Thumbnail for Battle of Lepanto
    Battle of Lepanto

    As the number of Christians in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries grew, so did demand for religous paintings from Europe. Because supply far outstripped demand, it became apparent that native artists would have to be trained. Many times the artists were simply shown how to copy the European paintings directly, but in this screen, commonly thought to be a depiction of the Battle of Lepanto, no pictorial prototype appears to have been available. The composition is actually made up of an arbitrary pastiche of themes copied form various sources. The contending forces are the Turks, to the right, and the Christian battalions, tightly grouped to the left, with their logistical advantage, matchlock guns, clearly depicted.- abridged from catalogue entry by Money Hickman.

  • Thumbnail for Shrine to Twenty-Six Martyrs
    Shrine to Twenty-Six Martyrs

    A monument in Nagasaki for 26 martyrs. They were all professed Christians of various ages, both Japanese and non-Japanese. They were made to walk from Kyoto to Nagasaki, where they were executed.

  • Thumbnail for Freedom of Religion
    Freedom of Religion

    The Greek Orthodox Church was constructed in 1891. As long as they professed loyalty to Shintoism first, the Japanese were allowed to worship as they pleased.

  • Thumbnail for Fan Painting of a Jesuit Church
    Fan Painting of a Jesuit Church by Shoshu, Kano (1551-1601)

    Although there is no consensus on which church is represented in this fan painting, most believe it to be the one on Shijobomon, due to its unusual three-story construction. This painting was among a series of sixty-one fans painted by Kano Shoshu, mounted in an album showing famous sites in and around Kyoto, of which only twenty-four paintings are thought to survive. - abridged from catalogue entry by Christine Guth.

  • Thumbnail for The Lord's Supper
    The Lord's Supper by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 5/80, 37 x 25 inches. There are 57 examples of the stencil-prints (kappazuri) of Watanabe Sadao in the Brauer Museum of Art. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe." (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). 23 institutions list examples of his work in their collections, including the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan. The range in date, subject, and size of these prints means that the Watanabe Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art provides excellent coverage of this key Creative Print master, increasing its value for his study.