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  • Thumbnail for Cipher [2015-2016 v.19 n.4 December]
  • Thumbnail for Between Barack and a hard place: racism, privilege, and denial in the age of Obama
    Between Barack and a hard place: racism, privilege, and denial in the age of Obama by Wise, Tim J.

    Anti-racist writer and activist Tim Wise has spoken on over 500 college campuses and has trained teachers as well as government, corporate, media, entertainment, military, and law enforcement officials on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions, and has served as a consultant for plaintiff's attorneys in federal discrimination cases in New York and Washington State. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded February 23, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for [2018-3-26] Indigenous Identity and Existence: Fighting Erasure and Racism
  • Thumbnail for The Catalyst [2017-2018 v.48 no.2 Sept. 8]
  • Thumbnail for The Racialized Roots and Repercussions of Pain Prescriptions: A County-Level Analysis of the Evolving Opioid Epidemic
    The Racialized Roots and Repercussions of Pain Prescriptions: A County-Level Analysis of the Evolving Opioid Epidemic by Gonzalez, Emma

    Previous research on the burgeoning opioid epidemic finds that prescription opioids provided the foundation for increasing opioid demand. This thesis replicates prior studies documenting changes in the factors associated with opioid overdose using data from 2008-2010 and 2015-2017 to attend to shifting patterns over time. I also attempt to address the interaction of institutional, racial, and class forces in contributing to high prescribing and overdose rates. With a sample of 546 U.S. counties, I conduct regression analyses to examine how social ecology provokes the flood of prescriptions into an area and how these factors are associated with death rates from both prescription and illicit opioids. Consistent with my hypotheses, high levels of economic distress and a high percent of the population identifying as white interact to predict high prescription rates in both time periods. Economic conditions and racial composition. These factors are also predictive of overdose rates, but are mediated by prescription rates in the earlier time period. However, prescription rate loses predictive power in the second time period, which warrants further research into the racialized roots of this public health crisis and the underground market driving overdose rates today.

  • Thumbnail for A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities
    A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities by Alvarado, Audriana Santana

    Discrimination comes in many forms especially amongst intersectional identifying people. This study focuses on the different types of discrimination that native Spanish- speaking women workers face often in Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. This comparative study discusses and explores the idea of how distance from the U.S./Mexico Border plays a role in the types of discrimination these women face. Some common types of discrimination encountered include: racism, colorism, sexism, classism, and discrimination based on language fluency and/or pronunciation. Distance plays a large factor in shaping political and social cultures of Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. The results show that in Tucson, Arizona, due to its closeness to the Border, there are many more Spanish-speakers and there are clear legal policies that particularly target Spanish-speaking populations. Meanwhile in Colorado Springs, there are lower percentages of Spanish-speaking populations, therefore, the discrimination can be much stronger since some people may not be accustomed to hearing Spanish being spoken, or sometimes not as strong as in Tucson because there are not as many laws directly targeted towards these populations since Colorado Springs is further from the Border. That’s not to say it doesn’t exist, because it is clear that social culture and media both target Spanish-speaking populations more often than laws in Colorado Springs. Both cities’ social and political cultures strongly impact the types of discrimination these women face in this study.

  • Thumbnail for Race and liberalism
    Race and liberalism by Mills, Charles W. (Charles Wade)

    Charles W. Mills delivers the annual J. Glenn and Ursula Gray Memorial Lecture on "Race and Liberalism." Professor Mills’s first book, "The Racial Contract," reassessed the social contract philosophy at the heart of early modern Western constitutionalism and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances, Colorado College. Recorded February 25, 2010.