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  • Thumbnail for Mitigating Vulnerability to Poor Mental Health Among Socially Disadvantaged Populations: Findings From MIDUS I, II, and III
    Mitigating Vulnerability to Poor Mental Health Among Socially Disadvantaged Populations: Findings From MIDUS I, II, and III by Gellert, Frances

    Recent studies suggest institutional racism in the health system and racial discrimination in other parts of society add stressors to people of color that negatively affect physical health as well as mental health (Gary 2005; Mays 2001; Okazaki 2009; McKenzie 2007). The MacArthur Midlife Research Network project collected phone interview and questionnaire data on physical and mental health indicators in the longitudinal study: Midlife in the United States (MIDUS). In addition to measures of health, participants in each wave (MIDUS 1 (1995-1996), MIDUS 2 (2004-2006), and MIDUS 3 (2013-2014)) provided responses regarding their self-rated religiosity, experience with discrimination, community integration, friend/family support, racial isolation, and demographic information. The purpose of this study was to a) question the extent oppression affects self-rated mental health, use of mental health services, and psychological well-being, b) examine the role such factors play in mitigating the effect of oppression on mental health and c) assess variation across time. Data were analyzed through multivariate logistic and OLS regression on Stata Software (15.0).

  • Thumbnail for The Racialized Roots and Repercussions of Pain Prescriptions: A County-Level Analysis of the Evolving Opioid Epidemic
    The Racialized Roots and Repercussions of Pain Prescriptions: A County-Level Analysis of the Evolving Opioid Epidemic by Gonzalez, Emma

    Previous research on the burgeoning opioid epidemic finds that prescription opioids provided the foundation for increasing opioid demand. This thesis replicates prior studies documenting changes in the factors associated with opioid overdose using data from 2008-2010 and 2015-2017 to attend to shifting patterns over time. I also attempt to address the interaction of institutional, racial, and class forces in contributing to high prescribing and overdose rates. With a sample of 546 U.S. counties, I conduct regression analyses to examine how social ecology provokes the flood of prescriptions into an area and how these factors are associated with death rates from both prescription and illicit opioids. Consistent with my hypotheses, high levels of economic distress and a high percent of the population identifying as white interact to predict high prescription rates in both time periods. Economic conditions and racial composition. These factors are also predictive of overdose rates, but are mediated by prescription rates in the earlier time period. However, prescription rate loses predictive power in the second time period, which warrants further research into the racialized roots of this public health crisis and the underground market driving overdose rates today.

  • Thumbnail for Socioeconomic disparities in youth obesity : an application of the household health production theory
    Socioeconomic disparities in youth obesity : an application of the household health production theory by Lowenstein, Christopher A.

    Existing literature indicates an undeniable link between socioeconomic status and adult obesity prevalence across the United States; the youth obesity epidemic is no exception to this trend. This study addresses potential demographic, socioeconomic and built environmental factors that may explain the mechanisms behind the observed inequalities in childhood and adolescent obesity. Using youth survey data from the western United States and various econometric techniques, the theory of household production of health is applied to help identify avenues through which these variables may impact children’s weight status. The results from this study support the consensus drawn from previous studies: food consumption and physical activity decisions are likely determined by a variety of household economic constraints which limit resources or access to resources necessary for the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle.

  • Thumbnail for “I came here to do something” : evaluating the motivations and ethical implications of international medical volunteers
    “I came here to do something” : evaluating the motivations and ethical implications of international medical volunteers by Meyer, Jessica Kate Vasington

    International medical volunteering is a growing trend around the world, stemming from current movements including a more interconnected globe through media and ease of travel. This has a developed a global conscience and concern for others across national borders. Within the United States, the national involvement and support among Americans for volunteering, the increase in international and service-based learning, and the general popularity of travel for leisure drives this trend even further. Ideally, international medical volunteering can successfully provide medical care in underserved communities. Research concerning the motivations of medical student and medical professional volunteers has shown that international medical volunteers are not only motivated by altruistic goals, but have personally oriented goals as well that drive them to partake in these experiences. The motivations of volunteers other than altruism complicate the situation, and no longer ensure that all practices are wholly ethical and not all outcomes reciprocally beneficial. This research at Colorado College provides a case study of these problems within the undergraduate medical volunteer constituency. The results of this study echo the same ethical questions seen in other international medical volunteer populations and provide a context to raise the right questions for further research and regulation of international medical volunteering practices across all constituencies. Reciprocal benefits to all parties in international medical volunteering should no longer be an idealized goal, but a worldwide standard.

  • Thumbnail for The Asclepian [2011 v. 1 issue 1 Block 4]
    The Asclepian [2011 v. 1 issue 1 Block 4]

    Compiled by Colorado College Students for Global Health. The Asclepian is an independent publication of the Students for Global Health Club. The newsletter was started in order to educate the student body about current issues affecting public and global health.

  • Thumbnail for Determinants of public health : the role of innovative capacity in developing countries
    Determinants of public health : the role of innovative capacity in developing countries by Brody, Alex I

    In 2008, the World Health Organization's Intergovernmental Working Group (IGWG) released a global strategy and plan of action for boosting R&D of medicines for neglected diseases predominantly found in developing countries. Among other recommendations, the report advocates and prioritizes the promotion of local R&D capacity in developing countries as a solution to the absence of pharmaceutical drug innovation. In response to the primary assumption underlying the IGWG proposal, that innovation is a positive determinant of public health, the purpose of this study is to investigate the socioeconomic determinants of public health in developing countries as well as introduce innovative capacity as a potential factor influencing the level of health. This study will test whether public health is a function of innovative capacity using a cross-country regression that incorporates known determinants of public health. Fifty-nine developing countries are included in the sample, two different measures of public health are used, and nine independent variables are tested. A total of four regression models are used to explain the relationships between the variables. Innovative capacity is quantified in two different ways in order to increase the accuracy of the measure. Ultimately, the results of the study show that democracy, number of physicians, sanitation, infrastructure, and one of the measures of innovative capacity are statistically significant determinants of public health in developing countries. The conclusions of this study provides perspective on the IGWG proposal and enriches the discussion about what socioeconomic factors are most important to develop in order to achieve increased public health in developing countries.

  • Thumbnail for A conversation with George McGovern
    A conversation with George McGovern by McGovern, George S. (George Stanley), 1922-

    Colorado College presents “A Conversation With Senator George S. McGovern,” the 1972 Democratic presidential nominee, three-term U.S. senator and two-term congressman, food and agriculture ambassador to the United Nations, and decorated B-24 pilot in the Second World War. McGovern discusses his book, "Abraham Lincoln," as well as current topics ranging from Afghanistan and Iraq to health care and world hunger. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded September 15, 2009.

  • Thumbnail for The Asclepian [2012 v. 1 issue 2]
    The Asclepian [2012 v. 1 issue 2]

    Compiled by Colorado College Students for Global Health. The Asclepian is an independent publication of the Students for Global Health Club. The newsletter was started in order to educate the student body about current issues affecting public and global health.

  • Thumbnail for Systemic inequalities in the American health care system : the Latino experience during the H1N1 pandemic
    Systemic inequalities in the American health care system : the Latino experience during the H1N1 pandemic by Triedman, Natalie Knapp

    Insurance companies and politicians have long asserted that the United States health care system is the best in the world. This fairytale idealizes what is actually a broken system of care that fails to honor fundamental human rights. Millions of Americans have no safety net to fall back on in the case of an unexpected illness and are forced to make trade-offs between health services and other essential daily needs. The 50 million uninsured Americans “are acutely aware that our health care system is not working for everyone, and there is growing recognition that the major problems of rising cost and lack of access continue a real crisis.” However, policy changes are slow to come. The underlying structural factors that hamper efforts to improve U.S. health care are rarely addressed because of the economic and political constraints that shape health improvement projects. Thus, band-aids are applied to curb the symptoms of problems that are much more than skin deep.

  • Thumbnail for Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria
    Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria by Ukachi, Ngozi B.

    Well-being of individuals and communities depend on accessibility to accurate health information. A recent study shows that many communities in regions of Nigeria lack accessibility to this information. Building on the success of partnerships between librarians and health care workers in the delivery of health information in other parts of the world, the Nigerian situation could be greatly improved through a number of strategies, as suggested in this article.