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11 hits

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar with dragon decoration, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Jar with dragon decoration, porcelain. by unknown

    A fairly large porcelain piece, very full in form. The surface of the piece functions as a canvas for the very bold, energetic brush decoration that covers the entire surface. The image is that of a dragon, a frequent theme in east Asian art, twisting as it moves through the air between clouds. The brush decoration is iron oxide applied under the glaze.

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Vase with reeds and egret, buncheong style ware.
    Korean ceramics: Vase with reeds and egret, buncheong style ware. by Park Young-sook (1947 - )

    Vase with reeds and egret, 1998, is a modern piece by Park Young-sook (1947 - ). The simple stoneware form was covered with white slip, which was then drawn through with a sharp tool, revealing the darker clay body beneath. Bits of clay and copper-oxide were added to form the tops of the reeds and the entire piece was then covered with a clear glaze contained a small amount of iron oxide, which produces the light green color, known as celadon. The techniques employed by the artist call deliberately on earlier traditions of Korean pottery, the buncheong tradition of the Joseon (Yi) dynasty (1392-1910). Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Gordon, 1999.48

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics:  Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. The form was covered with a contrasting white slip. Several horizontal bands were created by incising horizontal lines through the white slip. Within the horizontal bands, areas, defined by those incised lines, the potter or decorator then used brush and iron oxide to paint design motives on the surface, with the glaze then being applied over the decoration. The Avery Brundage Collection, B65P63

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. The form was covered with a white slip applied with a brush. The design on the piece was created by using a sharp tool to cut through the white slip coating, revealing the darker clay underneath, in the manner used in Buncheong ware. The Avery Brundage Collection, B67P41

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Porcelain Jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Porcelain Jar. by unknown

    Large spherical jar of the sort known as a "Moon" jar. The museum label comments, these jars "...were loved by Korean people not only because of their white color, which was suggestive of Confucian virtues, but also because the form was thought to represent the fertility and gentle, embracing qualities associated with women during the Joseon dynasty." This example presents an interesting comparison with the jar presented in file ecasia000358, another "Moon" jar from the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. The one in Chicago has a more matte glaze surface, while this one has a transparent glaze. The difference in the glaze may be the result of placement in different locations in a kiln, with the matte surface possibly resulting from a slightly cooler temperature and the transparent glaze from a slightly higher temperature, as might result at the different ends of a tube kiln. (The Avery Brundage collection, B60P110+ )

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Jar, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    A modest sized Buncheong ware jar, perhaps 5 inches in height. Stoneware with a white slip that was applied thickly with a coarse brush that left a sense of the gesture of the brush stroke on the surface. The form of this piece calls to mind the similar forms of pieces made in Japan in the 16th century, on the island of Kyushu, by Korean potters, such as those who created Takatori-ware in present-day Fukuoka Prefecture. An example of such a piece may be seen in image soc000146, in the St. Olaf College collection, Asian Take Out. Gift of Mr. Arthur J. McTaggart, 1998.25

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle, Buncheong ware. by unknown

    Bottle, stoneware. In this example, the decorative technique employed was quite different from the other two Bundheong ware bottles shown here. In this instance, the surface of the piece was stamped with a pattern, perhaps made of fired clay. The surface of the piece was then coated with white slip (porcelain), including the impressed pattern elements. The surface was then scraped clean of the white slip, revealing the darker underlying clay, while the white clay remained in the indentations stamped into the surface, creating the contrasting pattern of light and dark that we see here. The Avery Brundage Collection, B60P388

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Dish with Pine Tree, Buncheong-style ware.
    Korean ceramics: Dish with Pine Tree, Buncheong-style ware. by Min Young-ki (1947 - ), potter and Chun Sung-woo (1934 - ), painter

    This large dish is a collaborative piece, created by Min Young-ki, potter, and Chun Sung-woo, painter, both famous contemporary artists. The piece is in the style of Buncheong-ware. In this piece, the dish was created and coated with a white slip (clay in a liquid state); the image of a tall pine tree was painted on top of the white slip, and the piece was then covered with glaze and fired. Gift of Chung Yang-mo, 2004.14

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Bottle with medallion, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Bottle with medallion, porcelain. by unknown

    Bottle, thrown and faceted. The piece is porcelain with characters drawn on the surface with an underglaze cobalt slip or pigment. -- The Avery Brundage Collection, B64P30

  • Thumbnail for Korean ceramics: Jar in the shape of a barrel, porcelain.
    Korean ceramics: Jar in the shape of a barrel, porcelain. by unknown

    This piece presents an interesting contrast to the elegance of most of the other Korean forms presented here, images ecasia000382 through ecasia000387. This piece is heavy and broadly proportioned when compared with the other bottle forms with their narrow, soaring necks. Technically, it is an interesting piece, having been constructed obviously of three separate pieces. The body of the piece appears to have been formed by throwing two bowl forms which were then joined together, rim to rim, in the same manner as appeared to have been the case with the "Moon Jar" shown in image ecasia000358. The neck of this jar is also a separately thrown piece, a cylindrical form which was joined to the top of the piece to form its neck. The Avery Brundage Collection, B60P926

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Stand with a jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Stand with a jar. by unknown

    Stoneware jar on a stand, from the ancient region of Gaya in Korea. The stand accommodates the jar, which is round bottomed and could not stand on its own. The piercing of the stand base is probably visual, rather than being designed to serve a particular purpose. The side of the jar shows natural glazing, in the form of wood ash from the kiln fire that settled on the shoulder of the piece and fused with silica in the clay to create a natural, "accidental" glaze. (Gift of Juliet Boone, 1991.150.a-.b )