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  • Thumbnail for Sexual Orientation, Consistency, and Mental Health: Implications of Adult Identity Transition
    Sexual Orientation, Consistency, and Mental Health: Implications of Adult Identity Transition by Duckworth, Key

    Disparities in mental health outcomes between heterosexuals and sexual minorities – including lesbian/gay, bisexual, and questioning individuals – are well documented in the literature. However, few studies have examined the impact of sexual identity fluctuation over time. This study aims to assess the risk of depression and suicidal ideation in young adults, taking in to account both sexual orientation and consistency of orientation over time. Data from Waves 3 and 4 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 4127) were used to create seven categories of orientation/consistency: (1) consistently heterosexual, (2) inconsistently heterosexual, (3) consistently bisexual, (4) inconsistently bisexual, (5) consistently lesbian/gay, (6) inconsistently lesbian/gay, and (7) heteroflexible. Compared to consistent heterosexuals, all groups except consistent lesbians/gays are at significantly greater risk for at least one measure of poor mental health. Additionally, findings indicate that identity transition throughout young adulthood – as measured by inconsistency in reported orientation – increases risk for both depression and suicidal ideation.

  • Thumbnail for A Self-Defining Sound: Classical Music as it Pertains to Identity and Otherness
    A Self-Defining Sound: Classical Music as it Pertains to Identity and Otherness by Hines, Ariannis

    This project aims to critically examine European classical music, drawing from social, historical, and cultural factors that have driven its conception, growth, exceptionalization, and prevalent affect. Why are certain texts the way they are? What were people thinking about, talking about, doing, in a particular moment? How do all these things leave traces in the text?I argue that the history of classical music can illuminate how white supremacy evolved into the gravitational force it is today. Moreover, this study seeks to articulate how mass participation in classical orchestras effects one’s sense of self.

  • Thumbnail for Setting the Record (Not) Straight: Lesbian Identities in Conversation with the Term Queer
    Setting the Record (Not) Straight: Lesbian Identities in Conversation with the Term Queer by Stoetzer, Kendall

    The identity terms “queer” and “lesbian” often overlap, as both can be used to describe women and woman-aligned people who love other women. Is the term “queer” then appropriate to use in reference to self-identified lesbians? Through qualitative interviewing, this study explores the formation of a lesbian identity for nine lesbians, and their attitude towards the term “queer.” A lesbian identity seems to be empowering in many aspects of respondents’ lives, including in the exploration of gender identity as well as empowering in the formation of a community; however, the process of accepting a lesbian identity seems to be a difficult one. Results of this study indicate that many lesbians have faced societal pressures and biases against the word “lesbian,” and thus find the lesbian identity to be hard-won. Due to the bias against the word lesbian and the ambiguity of the label queer, many lesbians find “queer” to be an unfit personal label. In this study, the label “queer” seems to generalize lesbian identities, and blur the distinct boundary of the word “lesbian,” which is one that explicitly leaves no room for men.

  • Thumbnail for A Self-Defining Sound: Classical Music as it Pertains to Identity and Otherness
    A Self-Defining Sound: Classical Music as it Pertains to Identity and Otherness by Hines, Ariannis

    This project aims to critically examine European classical music, drawing from social, historical, and cultural factors that have driven its conception, growth, exceptionalization, and prevalent affect. Why are certain texts the way they are? What were people thinking about, talking about, doing, in a particular moment? How do all these things leave traces in the text? and I argue that the history of classical music can illuminate how white supremacy evolved into the gravitational force it is today. Moreover, this study seeks to articulate how mass participation in classical orchestras effects one’s sense of self.