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  • Thumbnail for Roberts, Carl L., Jr.
    Roberts, Carl L., Jr. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Carl Roberts came to the field of psychology after serving in the Navy, going to college for a short time, working in the business world, and then returning to college. From graduate school at the University of Missouri, Roberts came to Colorado College as assistant professor in 1957 to teach experimental psychology. He became associate professor in 1961 and full professor in 1967. He was interested in the experimental analysis of behavior, behavior modification, learning theory, animal behavior, and the philosophy of science. With student help, he built an experimental lab for the department. He was successful in increasing funding for the department by interesting Presidents Worner and Benezet in the department’s research. He also received several national grants.

  • Thumbnail for Sondermann, Judy
    Sondermann, Judy by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Judy Sondermann (CC class of 1981) is the daughter of the late Colorado College Professor Fred A. Sondermann. Judy graduated with a B.A. in psychology, and a Certificate of Education. She played women's varsity soccer for Colorado College for four years. In 1981, she was selected for a women's college soccer team that traveled to Europe for training and competition. In the 1981-82 season, Judy was an assistant coach of Colorado College's women's soccer team. She discusses growing up at Colorado College, campus life as a student, athletics, soccer, and her father, Fred Sondermann.

  • Thumbnail for Brannon, Grace Berkley
    Brannon, Grace Berkley by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Grace Brannon arrived in Colorado Springs with her parents in 1916 and attended Columbia grade school and Colorado Springs High School. As a student at Colorado College, she majored in romance languages (CC class of 1927). Mrs. Brannon describes the importance of social and athletic activities during her time as a student at Colorado College, including: attitudes towards sex (1920's), the Bruin Inn, Minerva Society, cars, alcohol, dances, clothing, athletics, homecoming, and Colorado College songs. She talks about memorable professors: Charles Latimer, Rebecca Hartness, Robert F. Snyder, Ralph J. Gilmore. Administrators whom she remembers were: Manly Ormes, President Charles Mierow, Mabel Barbee Lee. She reflects on her work as an alumni trustee from 1958 to 1964. Other interests discussed are the League of Women Voters and the Democratic Party.

  • Thumbnail for Copeland, William D.
    Copeland, William D. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William D. Copeland (CC class of 1919) served as instructor in English and secretary of the College from 1920 to 1935. He later served as president of Lincoln College in Lincoln, Illinois, vice president of Lake Forest College in Illinois, president of Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, and pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Polson, Montana. Copeland gives his impressions of Colorado College both before and after World War I, including memories of Presidents Slocum, Duniway, Mierow, and Davies. He talks about the effects of the Depression,"straight-laced CC" in the 1920's, athletic teams, fraternities, and the San Luis School. Faculty mentioned in the interview: Cajori, Schneider, Parsons, Blum, Parrish, Hills, Howe, Hulbert, Gilmore, Strieby, and Okey.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Raymond Dean
    Jones, Raymond Dean by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Raymond D. Jones (CC class of 1967) was born in Pueblo, Colorado on November 30, 1945. While at Colorado College, Jones was the first African-American president of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. After graduating from Colorado College, he received his law degree from Harvard University in 1971. At the time of this interview he was a judge in the Denver District Court, appointed by Governor Richard Lamm. Jones’ interview focuses on campus life in the 1960’s, attitudes about civil rights in Colorado Springs, and experiences from the perspective of a minority student.

  • Thumbnail for Ormes, Robert Manly
    Ormes, Robert Manly by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Ormes (CC class of 1926) taught English at Colorado College from 1952 to 1973. He was also well known and highly regarded as a mountaineer, raconteur and author of several books, including A Guide to the Colorado Mountains, Colorado Skylines, Pike's Peak Atlas, Tracking Colorado's Ghost Railroads and Railroads and the Rockies. Born in Colorado Springs in 1904, Ormes was the son of Manly Ormes, former head librarian of Coburn Library, Colorado College. Ormes recounts his memories of growing up around Colorado College and his adventures in the nearby mountains.

  • Thumbnail for Fisher, Alan
    Fisher, Alan by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Alan Fisher (CC class of 1968) grew up in Wichita, Kansas attending Wichita State for one year before transferring to Colorado College in 1965. Graduating with his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1968, he served in the U.S. Army until 1971. He received a Master of Library Science in 1972 from Denver University, and a Master of Arts in Business from the University of Nebraska in 1976. He served as reference librarian at Tutt Library from 1977 to 1983. Alan describes campus life and attitudes during the late 1960's.

  • Thumbnail for Madruga, Herving
    Madruga, Herving by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Herving Madruga, a native of Cuba, joined the Colorado College Romance Languages faculty in 1958. He received his B.A. (1952) and M.A. (1954) from Harvard University, a Certificat de Phonetique from the University of Paris, France in 1954; and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in 1965. Professor Madruga was one of the founding faculty and the early director of the Program in Comparative Literature at Colorado College. He is also known for his French theater productions. He retired in 1994.

  • Thumbnail for Bowers, Wilber Lamb
    Bowers, Wilber Lamb by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mr. Wilber "Bill" Lamb Bowers was a well-known Colorado Springs photographer. His maternal grandfather was Henry Lamb, a pioneer chemist and assayer who taught in the Colorado College Chemistry Department and who was the photographer of the famous early Cutler Hall photo. Bill Bowers' mother also taught in the Chemistry Department, and his father, Clarence Bowers, taught in the College Conservatory of Music from 1896 to 1905. Bill Bowers was a 1927 graduate of the University of Arizona, served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and, after the war, established a photography business in Colorado Springs with his brother-in-law, Lloyd Knutson. Knutson-Bowers Photographers had a long association with Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Beidleman, Richard Gooch
    Beidleman, Richard Gooch by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A prolific writer, a much sought-after speaker, and a highly respected professor, Richard Beidleman is one of Colorado College's most notable faculty members. He taught zoology from 1957-1968 and biology from 1968-1988. His research interests centered on the role of natural scientists in frontier America and Australia, and he helped author high school and junior high school biology textbooks, among approximately 250 other published works. The Colorado Springs community knows him best as a dedicated environmental activist who fought for many years for such causes as the preservation of the White House Ranch and the Garden of the Gods Park, the prevention of strip mining along Front Range quarries, and the successful League of Women Voters lawsuit against the City of Colorado Springs regarding the Palmer deeded parks. He served on the Colorado State Parks Board for eight years, including three and a half years as its chairman and succeeded, among other things, in obtaining Muehler Ranch as a state park. The Beidleman Environmental Center at Sondermann Park was established in his honor by the City of Colorado Springs.

  • Thumbnail for Levkulich, Mary Birovchak
    Levkulich, Mary Birovchak by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Mary came to the United States from Austria-Hungary when she was eighteen. She was born in 1896. She was the only child of six in her family who got to immigrate and tells of coming through Ellis Island by herself. She lived in New York City, and then moved to Minersville, Penn. where she met her husband, George Levkulich, also an immigrant. They moved wherever he could find work in coal mines. They moved to the Craig area in 1926 and found they had to buy 160 acres because all the homesteading land in Breeze Basin was taken. She tells many stories about: poor living conditions, learning to drive horses, raising 300 chickens, raising animals, growing crops, and butchering and storing meat. She describes "the shack" they first had on their farm and living conditions. Mary had seven children. They had several fire disasters with the chickens and crops. She talks about killing a rattlesnake, and getting rid of gophers. Mary talks about: baking bread in a coal stove, making clothes, and preserving food. She was afraid to visit her home in "Europe" because she would have to deal with the Russian Embassy. Mary died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Rector, Katherine Warren
    Rector, Katherine Warren by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Katherine's father homesteaded on two, forty acre tracts of a pre-emption in 1891. He had arrived in Meeker in 1882. Her mother grew up on the mesa south of Meeker. Katherine was born in 1909. Her mother left the family when Katherine was twelve and she became the housewife. Nellie Parks is her older sister. Katherine married Ralph Rector, and they lived on her father's ranch for seventy-three years because her husband worked the ranch with her father. She talks about: raising pigs, chickens and turkeys, killing deer out of season for food, and canning garden vegetables. She also describes: washing on the board, hanging clothes, working in the hayfield, milking cows, and puberty. They traveled the twelve miles to town very seldom. The rural school (winter school) teacher boarded with them. She talks about: home remedies, doctors for births, accidents, and surgery on the kitchen table. She describes her marriage and living for a short time in Frazier, Colorado while her husband worked on the Moffat Tunnel. It was very cold. They had two daughters and she describes their births. Katherine died in 1999.

  • Thumbnail for Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman
    Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Audrey's mother came to visit her brother in Meeker at the age of fourteen in the early 1900s. She worked at the halfway house between Rifle and Meeker for several years. It was there she met her husband John Oldland, who was working as a guide for Teddy Roosevelt. They settled in Powell Park and had ten children. Audrey describes: her mother's cooking, sewing, the houses they lived in, children's play (dolls), and inside/outside work. She rode a horse five miles to school in the winter. When she was twelve years old she worked for neighbors, cooking and washing dishes to pay for her clothes and school books. She talks about a bad first menstruation experience. Audrey describes home remedies and the 1918 flu which struck her family. She attended beauty school in Grand Junction and worked for a short time in Meeker before marrying John Oldland. She describes beauty shop experiences. She had three children and talks about pregnancy and birthing experiences. The family lived on the Oldland ranch. She learned to fly and was the only woman at that time that flew in the area. Audrey died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Corley, Fern Pring
    Corley, Fern Pring by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Fern Pring Corley came to Colorado Springs in 1907, attending Garfield Elementary School and Colorado Springs High School. Corley (CC class of 1922) majored in chemistry. Her father, William J. Pring, was a pioneer rancher in the Pikes Peak region, and her husband's father, Mr. W. D. Corley, built the Corley Mountain Highway, now called the Gold Camp Road, on the roadbed of the old Short Line Railroad to Cripple Creek. Mrs. Corley describes student life at Colorado College including tuition, the Bruin Inn, student jobs, football, women's sports, freshman hazing, pranks, campus buildings, literary societies and Monument Valley Park. Included in the interview are descriptions of her early childhood in Colorado Springs, her family's early history in the area, and her husband's businesses.

  • Thumbnail for Mott, Jennie J. Steele
    Mott, Jennie J. Steele by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jennie's parents came to Rangely in 1926 with nine children. They homesteaded on Little Foundation in 1931, thirty miles from Rangely. Jennie was born in 1930. The family eventually had eleven children, but two died with "crib death," and one was a still birth. Her mother didn't have a doctor for some of them. She talks about her mother doing the work inside and outside the house: irrigation, milking, and feeding cows. Jennie talks about medical care in a very rural area: broken bones, scarlet fever, and the doctor who came from Meeker for emergencies. Jennie discusses big winter snows and cold, and riding to school on horses. Her mother home schooled the children some years. Her mother eventually got her B.A. and Master's degrees and taught in the Rangely schools for twenty years. Jennie finished high school in Rangely. Jennie talks about the house they lived in on the ranch, sometimes sleeping three to a bed in the two room house. Later they built a new house, and the children slept in the old house. Jennie also talks about what they did for entertainment, and travel away from the ranch.

  • Thumbnail for Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford
    Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Wilma's father arrived in the Meeker area to homestead in 1885. Her mother arrived in a covered wagon with her sister. She remembers coming to town on a sled for the mail. She talks about her life on the ranch: play, work inside and outside, clothing, and washing clothes. And she describes a typical day's activities. She attended a winter rural school 1 1/2 miles away. She talks about dances, sleigh rides, and ice skating. Wilma liked to play baseball - she was the catcher. She talks about the first automobiles, which they had to put up on blocks in the winter. Wilma went to college at the University of Colorado at Boulder for two years, taking French, physics, and English. Then she married and had one child. Her husband died in an accident when her daughter was two years old. She lived with her mother in Meeker and worked at various jobs (housecleaning, babysitting, as a clerk, in a laundry, and in a garage). Wilma died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Whalin, Inez Ely
    Whalin, Inez Ely by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Inez Whalin tells her experiences through her daughter, Ethelyn Crawford. When she was twenty-three years old, Inez married her husband at her home in rural Illinois, a much more settled area than northwestern Colorado in 1912. At that time he was the foreman on the James ranch in Moffat County. Inez cooked for all the ranch hands. They soon moved to Mr. Whalin's homestead on Thornburg near Meeker, a one room log cabin, which she describes. Inez had eight children, but lost one who was eight months old to pneumonia. The doctor usually missed the births. She talks about: birth control, childless women, home remedies, and poetry. She was sorry that she didn't go to college; her parents thought her too frail. Instead, she worked in a knitting factory before her marriage. Her neighbors asked her to teach, but her husband said she couldn't. Inez died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Kenney, Glee Cloward
    Kenney, Glee Cloward by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    When she was eight years old, Glee came to the Rangely area with her father and two siblings (1921?). Her mother had just died of diabetes. Her father had worked in the coal mines in Winterquarters, Utah where Glee was born in 1913. Her father leased a ranch near Rangely where he felt he could take better care of the three children. She describes: household chores, winter activities, dances, school, puberty, and clothing. Glee also describes the town of Rangely and what staples her family bought at the one store. She talks about their food sources: meat from cows, and hunting. Glee married Lester Kenney at seventeen and lived on several ranches owned by her husband's father in the Rangely area. She had three children and went to Vernal, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado for their births. She describes the small school in Rangely (twelve children) that had teachers who boarded with local families. Glee died in 2000.

  • Thumbnail for Johnson, James Alan
    Johnson, James Alan by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Johnson (CC class of 1956) graduated with a major in economics. He was hired as an instructor in the Business Administration and Economics Department immediately following his graduation. After receiving his M.A. in Economics from Stanford University in 1959, he was promoted to assistant professor in 1961, associate professor in 1969, and professor in 1980. Professor Johnson's most notable contribution to the college was as registrar from the implementation of the Block Plan in 1970 to 1990. During his tenure, he initiated computerization of student and course records, an innovative point system, and a writing program across the curriculum. Following his retirement in 1995, he continued to serve as the coach of the Colorado College Forensics Team, a position he held for over 40 years.

  • Thumbnail for Hochman, William R.
    Hochman, William R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor William R. Hochman was born on August 28, 1921 in New York City, and received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. Professor Hochman joined the Colorado College faculty as instructor of history in 1955, as assistant professor from 1955 through 1960, as associate professor from 1960 to 1965, and as professor from 1965 until his retirement in 1998. He served as Chair of the Department of Education for four years, beginning in 1964 and as Chair of the History Department from 1970 to 1983, and Dean of the Summer Session from 1990–1998. He also served on innumerable campus committees and as faculty marshal for many years. Notable for his compelling public speaking, Professor Hochman was long active in local, state and national Democratic Party politics, but he is best known as an outstanding teacher by his many former students, particularly the alumni of Freedom and Authority.

  • Thumbnail for Fagan, George V.
    Fagan, George V. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A native of Philadelphia born in 1917, Dr. George V. Fagan received his B.S. and M.A. degrees from Temple University, his Master of Library Science degree from the University of Denver in 1957 and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 1954. A World War II veteran, he served as librarian of the United States Air Force Academy for 15 years before his retirement from the Air Force in 1969 with the rank of Colonel. From 1969 to 1983 he was head librarian at Colorado College's Tutt Library. During his tenure, he added more than 100,000 volume to the library, established the Special Collections Division, created the Lincoln Room and CC Room, oversaw the planning and construction of the 25,000 square-foot addition to the library, and established the Friends of the Library. In 1988 Dr. Fagan authored a book entitled, The Air Force Academy: An Illustrated History.

  • Thumbnail for Jackson, Helen
    Jackson, Helen by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Helen Jackson, born in Colorado Springs in 1890, gave this interview at the age of 87. Her father, William Sharpless Jackson, was a close associate of General Palmer, and he served on the Colorado College Board of Trustees between 1874 and 1917. Her brother, William S. Jackson, Jr., served as a trustee for 50 years between 1925 and 1975. One of seven children, Miss Jackson was the daughter of William S. Jackson, Sr.'s second wife, Helen Fisk Banfield, and a great-niece of his first wife, the writer Helen Hunt. Miss Jackson graduated from Cutler Academy in 1907, received her B.A. at Vassar in 1912, and an M.A. from Colorado College in 1915. She taught school for many years at the Dudley Road School in Massachusetts, before returning to Colorado Springs around 1942 to become custodian of the Jackson family home at 228 East Kiowa. When the home was torn down in 1961 and reconstructed at the Pioneer Museum, Miss Jackson became the interpreter of its history to thousands of museum visitors, especially area school children.

  • Thumbnail for Mertz, Joseph Douglas
    Mertz, Joseph Douglas by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Joseph Douglas Mertz, a 1938 graduate of Ursinus College, received his law degree from Yale Law School in 1942. After two years teaching law at Dickinson Law School in Carlyle, Pennsylvania, he joined the Political Science Department at Colorado College in 1948, as assistant professor. He became associate professor and chairman of the department in 1953. He served as chairman until 1972 and retired in 1982. In addition to his faculty appointment, he also served the college as legal consultant from 1970 to 1982, and as general secretary from 1982 through 1983. He discusses the effects of McCarthyism during the Gill presidency, the growth of the Political Science Department, the effects of the Block Plan, and his work with President Worner and the Board of Trustees.

  • Thumbnail for Joyce, Mary Barkalow Holt
    Joyce, Mary Barkalow Holt by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary Barkalow Joyce (CC class of 1938) came with her sister and widowed mother to Colorado College from California in 1934 when her mother was offered the position as Head Resident of Bemis Hall. As an entering freshman, Miss Barkalow was offered a job as a “hasher” in Bemis. She talks about her enjoyment of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority; her professors, particularly her female professors as role models; her introduction to social work, which became her profession; campus social life; campus athletics; Murray’s Drug Store; classes; chapel attendance; and her career in social work. She compares her college experience to that of her granddaughters who attended Colorado College. Grace Berkley Brannon (CC class of 1927) contributes to this interview.

  • Thumbnail for Zagoras, Maro K.
    Zagoras, Maro K. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Maro K. Zagoras (CC class of 1989) was born December 23, 1966, in Waukegan, Illinois. She enrolled at Colorado College in the fall of 1985 and graduated with a B.A. in political science. While at Colorado College, Zagoras served as a Resident Assistant in Slocum, as Circle K president, and on an advisory board for leadership, volunteerism and community service and helped establish a community service center at Colorado College. She also served as senior class president during the 1988-89 academic year. She describes the faculty, students and administrators, and reflects on campus life in the 1980’s.