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127 hits

  • Thumbnail for Bryson, Dorothy Printup
    Bryson, Dorothy Printup by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dorothy Printup Hulbert Bryson was an instructor in Greek and Latin at Colorado College from 1921-1925. In 1923 she married history professor and noted historian Archer Butler Hulbert who became head of the Stewart Commission on Western History. After his death in 1933, she served as editor of the Commission until 1941. She returned to Colorado College between 1951 and 1960, working in various capacities: as head resident, summer school secretary, and part-time English instructor. She was active in many community organizations including the Woman's Educational Society. She received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Colorado College in 1989. Her third husband was A. Earl Bryson (CC class of 1911).

  • Thumbnail for Stewart, Marka Webb
    Stewart, Marka Webb by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Varina Margaret “Marka” Webb was born in Colorado Springs on May 13, 1905, the eldest of five children of Dr. Gerald Bertram Webb, a noted physician, and Varina Howell Davis Webb, the granddaughter of Jefferson Davis. Marka graduated from Oldfield School in Glencoe, Maryland, in 1924, and married Colorado Springs attorney Gerald W. Bennett, on January 7, 1926. They were the parents of two sons, Gerald and Charles, before Mr. Bennett's untimely death in 1936. As a young widow, Marka served as a companion to her father until his own death in 1948. In 1956, she married John Wolcott Stewart, son of Philip B. Stewart, longtime trustee of Colorado College. Her numerous community interests included the Webb-Waring Lung Institute, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Symphony Orchestra and Opera Festival, and the Woman's Educational Society.

  • Thumbnail for Jones, Raymond Dean
    Jones, Raymond Dean by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Raymond D. Jones (CC class of 1967) was born in Pueblo, Colorado on November 30, 1945. While at Colorado College, Jones was the first African-American president of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. After graduating from Colorado College, he received his law degree from Harvard University in 1971. At the time of this interview he was a judge in the Denver District Court, appointed by Governor Richard Lamm. Jones’ interview focuses on campus life in the 1960’s, attitudes about civil rights in Colorado Springs, and experiences from the perspective of a minority student.

  • Thumbnail for Johns, Gilbert R.
    Johns, Gilbert R. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor of Psychology Gilbert R. Johns, who received his Ph.D. from the University of Indiana, came to Colorado College in 1962, following a teaching appointment at Ohio University. His specialties have been in sensory psychology and perception and the history of science and psychology. Professor Johns served as the Dean of the Colorado College Summer Session for 15 years, from 1965 to 1981. He was director of the Colorado Opera Festival from 1970 to 1978. From 1982 to 1992 he was critic at large for the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. He retired in 1996.

  • Thumbnail for Arnest, Bernard Patrick
    Arnest, Bernard Patrick by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Bernard Arnest, a Denver native born in 1917, was a professor of art at Colorado College from 1957–1982. He was Chairman of the Art Department for 17 of those 25 years. A noted painter whose works have been exhibited at various galleries throughout the country, Arnest received his formal training at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center School of Art from 1935 to 1939.

  • Thumbnail for Boddington, William Gile "Tim"
    Boddington, William Gile "Tim" by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    William Gile “Tim” Boddington (CC class of 1972) was a Colorado Springs native. He attended Lake Forest College in Illinois during the 1968-69 academic year but transferred to Colorado College in the fall of 1969 and graduated with a B.S. in geology. His interview includes his reflections on academic, athletic and social life at Colorado College during the early 1970’s.

  • Thumbnail for Mashburn, Mary Gaston
    Mashburn, Mary Gaston by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Mary G. Mashburn (CC class of 1983) graduated with a major in political economy. She was active in student publications: editor of the Catalalyst, 1980-1981; and editor of the Critique, 1981-1982. Ms. Mashburn's interview focuses on student life at Colorado College during the 1980's.

  • Thumbnail for Jeffries, Karl
    Jeffries, Karl by Wallace, Andrew

    Karl Jeffries came to Colorado College from a small town in Southern Colorado in 1987 and graduated in 1991. He was diagnosed with HIV shortly after graduation and now lives in Berkeley, California with his partner and two kids. Karl was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project during his visit for homecoming weekend on October 16, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Liddle, Evelyn Berdine Johnson and Liddle, Edward B.
    Liddle, Evelyn Berdine Johnson and Liddle, Edward B. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Dr. Edward B. Liddle (CC class of 1943) and his wife, Evelyn Johnson Liddle (CC class of 1943) were both natives of Colorado Springs. Dr. Liddle was born on July 11, 1922, was a member of Phi Gamma Beta fraternity while at Colorado College, and graduated with a degree in biology. Dr. Liddle has been a general and thoracic surgeon in Colorado Springs since 1955. Mrs. Liddle was born on July 27, 1921, was a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority and the Koshare drama club while at Colorado College, and graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. Among the topics they discuss was the impact of the outbreak of World War II on the campus.

  • Thumbnail for Mertz, Joseph Douglas
    Mertz, Joseph Douglas by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Joseph Douglas Mertz, a 1938 graduate of Ursinus College, received his law degree from Yale Law School in 1942. After two years teaching law at Dickinson Law School in Carlyle, Pennsylvania, he joined the Political Science Department at Colorado College in 1948, as assistant professor. He became associate professor and chairman of the department in 1953. He served as chairman until 1972 and retired in 1982. In addition to his faculty appointment, he also served the college as legal consultant from 1970 to 1982, and as general secretary from 1982 through 1983. He discusses the effects of McCarthyism during the Gill presidency, the growth of the Political Science Department, the effects of the Block Plan, and his work with President Worner and the Board of Trustees.

  • Thumbnail for Olson, Howard M.
    Olson, Howard M. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A graduate of Colorado College (CC class of 1925), Professor Howard M. Olson taught physics at Colorado College between 1925 and 1969. He completed graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley. Olson remembers: Professors Tileston, Lovitt, Sisam, Daehler, Swart, Boucher, Wright and Presidents Duniway and Mierow. In his interview Olson also talks about classwork, fraternities (Pi Kappa Alpha - engineering), dances at the Broadmoor, Bruin Inn, his teaching philosophy, students during the late sixties, and the building of Olin Hall.

  • Thumbnail for Eddy, Ina Dalrymple
    Eddy, Ina Dalrymple by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Ina was born in Hurley, New Mexico in 1916 into a family of twelve children. When she was two they moved to Meeker, Colorado and her father died when she was six. They then moved to Rifle where she attended school. The family was very poor after father's death and Ina talks about: little medical care, home remedies, puberty, deaths of children from TB, spinal meningitis, years of deprivation and sadness, and describes the death of her closest sister from spinal meningitis. Ina married John H. Eddy when she graduated from high school. After having three children, one premature, she found she was RH negative. The family moved around Colorado for her husband's jobs until settling in Rangely where he worked in the Texaco oil field. She describes the early years of the town of Rangely during the oil boom: streets, and schools. They lived in a Texaco company house near the field. Ina worked in the school cafeteria for a number of years. In later years, she and her husband lived in several places in the West for his employment with the government. She missed watching her grandchildren growing up. Ina died in 1988.

  • Thumbnail for Sondermann, Fred A.
    Sondermann, Fred A. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Fred A. Sondermann was born in Horn, Germany, in 1923 and came to the United States in 1939. He received his B.A. from Butler University in 1949, his M.A. from Indiana University in 1950, and his Ph.D. in international relations from Yale University in 1953. Professor Sondermann was a member of the Department of Political Science from 1953 to 1978. He served as Associate Dean of the College from 1962 to 1965, and as Director of the Colorado College Symposium Series from 1963 through 1968. Actively involved in civic affairs, he served on the Colorado Springs City Planning Commission, the City Council, and the Colorado Land Use Commission.

  • Thumbnail for Hoth, Jayne White
    Hoth, Jayne White by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Jayne was born at home in Sunbeam, Colorado in 1918. Her grandmother, Sarah Farrell, came to the Sunbeam area to homestead as a single woman in 1887 from Ohio. She came at age thirty-two because she hadn't married and was considered a failure. She married a cowboy in 1890. Sarah was a practical nurse and delivered many babies in this remote area. Jayne tells stories of her grandmother and mother living on the homestead: home remedies, dances, food, outside work, and isolation in the winter. Jayne talks about her own childhood as a "tomboy." When she started school she went to a rural school and then moved to Denver to live with her grandparents. She returned to the Maybell area in 1944 at age twenty-six with one son and divorced. She married again to Carl E. "Mike" Hoth, and lived on ranches where her husband worked. Jayne cooked for the ranch hands and also worked outside with her husband. They had three children. Jayne talks about: ranch life, hobbies, and clubs. Jayne died in 1989.

  • Thumbnail for Bair, Elva Lois Wells Biles
    Bair, Elva Lois Wells Biles by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Lois (Elva) was born in Oklahoma in 1912 and moved to Colorado in 1923. Her parents bought 320 acres in Skull Creek, near Vernal, Utah, and the family of ten children lived in a one room log cabin. She talks about: attending school in a one room school through eighth grade, taking care of siblings, food sources and preparation, play, homemade clothes, puberty, long distances to town, school, church, women's clubs, and deep winter snow. Lois married Bud Biles, a cowboy, at seventeen and settled in Red Wash (near Utah border). They were married for forty-nine years. She rode in rodeos with her husband. Her two daughters were born in Denver due to complications. She was married to her second husband, Everette Bair, for just two years before he died. Lois died in 1988.

  • Thumbnail for Caunt, Kay Lynn Niederhut
    Caunt, Kay Lynn Niederhut by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Kay Niederhut Caunt (CC class of 1972) came to Colorado College from her home in Denver, Colorado, and graduated with a B.A. in history. Her interview focuses on campus life as a married student, campus attitudes toward the Vietnam War, and her early involvement in politics. She was a state legislative candidate in 1974, a member of the Colorado Democratic Party's executive committee and rules committee and worked with the Colorado Springs-El Paso County CETA Manpower Planning Council.

  • Thumbnail for Rawlinson, Hilda M. Shelton Fickle
    Rawlinson, Hilda M. Shelton Fickle by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Hilda's parents homesteaded in Dry Lake, fifteen miles south of Maybell in 1916. They lived in a rented house, a tent, and a dugout before they built the homestead. They also homesteaded a second time on Wolf Mountain, further south on Price Creek. Hilda talks about: grubbing sage brush, building the school, homeschooling, description of the dugout, and hauling water. She describes the 1918 flu, death, and burial. She talks about the outside work she did as the oldest girl: building fence, herding cows, breaking horses, plowing fields, mowing and pitching hay. She also describes: types of clothing, transportation, play, dances in Maybell, doctors, pregnancy, births, medical issues, and home remedies. She worked as a maternity helper from age fifteen to eighteen, and then worked at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Junction until she married at age twenty. They went to California to work on a fruit farm until the depression and then returned to Price Creek to buy a ranch. She talks about difficult years with lack of water, loss of animals, and Home Demonstration clubs. They had one child. Hilda enjoyed painting with oils. Hilda died in 2001.

  • Thumbnail for Sides, Bernice Van Cleave and Richards, Beryl Van Cleave
    Sides, Bernice Van Cleave and Richards, Beryl Van Cleave by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Bernice and Beryl are twin sisters who were born in Oregon in 1903. They came to Meeker in 1903 with their father, a carpenter, and their mother, a teacher. The women wanted to be interviewed together. Bernice tells of their mother's death from surgery on the dining room table - they were six years old. She describes life in Meeker in the early 1900's: clothes washing, schools, games, women's activities, a "poor farm", and adult activities. She also describes her career as a bank cashier. Then Beryl speaks and talks about the early death of their mother and their relationship to the woman their father married, in part, to care for them. Beryl describes the organization of Meeker's first library by a group of women in 1925. Both sisters were then interviewed and they spoke about: school, play, baking, housekeeping, view of marriage, and coping without their mother. Beryl talks about her marriage to Father Richards and her role as an Episcopal priest's wife. Bernice talks about her married life with William "Bill" Sides, and her career in the bank. Neither sister had children. Beryl died in 1994, and Bernice died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman
    Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Audrey's mother came to visit her brother in Meeker at the age of fourteen in the early 1900s. She worked at the halfway house between Rifle and Meeker for several years. It was there she met her husband John Oldland, who was working as a guide for Teddy Roosevelt. They settled in Powell Park and had ten children. Audrey describes: her mother's cooking, sewing, the houses they lived in, children's play (dolls), and inside/outside work. She rode a horse five miles to school in the winter. When she was twelve years old she worked for neighbors, cooking and washing dishes to pay for her clothes and school books. She talks about a bad first menstruation experience. Audrey describes home remedies and the 1918 flu which struck her family. She attended beauty school in Grand Junction and worked for a short time in Meeker before marrying John Oldland. She describes beauty shop experiences. She had three children and talks about pregnancy and birthing experiences. The family lived on the Oldland ranch. She learned to fly and was the only woman at that time that flew in the area. Audrey died in 1993.

  • Thumbnail for Woolley, Estel Aicher
    Woolley, Estel Aicher by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Estel's father came to the Meeker area in about 1888, and her mother came in 1898 to visit her sister. They married and lived on the homestead on Flag Creek. Estel was the only child. She describes her mother's life on the ranch. Estel wasn't expected to do any of the work. She talks about: riding her horse to school in very cold winters, play with neighbors, home remedies, puberty, and sports in school. Her parents bought a ranch in Grand Junction where Estel attended high school. She also went high school in Denver. She went to Business College in Grand Junction and then returned to Meeker to work in the County Clerk's office, where she worked for several years. Estel married a man from Craig, Raymond "Ray" Woolley, but they eventually settled in Meeker where she had two daughters. She talks about: childbirth and aftercare. While she worked, her mother did her housework and ironing, and cooked for her in-laws. Estel also talks about surgery in homes - her father drove the doctor to country appointments and administered ether. Estel died in 1990.

  • Thumbnail for Stoddard, Lena Ely
    Stoddard, Lena Ely by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Lena came to Hayden with her husband, a teacher, who had been invited by Ferry Carpenter to come to teach there in 1921. Their first child was born at the Hayden Inn. They filed on a six hundred and forty acre homestead, which they maintained for six years. They sold it to an area sheep rancher for enough money to buy the Empire Courier newspaper in Craig, which they continued to run for two generations. In the early years Lena answered the telephone, read proof, and collected social news. They also maintained the area weather station for eight years. Readings were taken every three hours and reported to the regional weather office. Lena talks about: women's clubs, use of sleds in the 1920's and 30's, the sheep trail that went by their house in Craig, newspaper subscriptions paid with local produce, political activities, and home remedies. Lena had five children. Lena died in 1991.

  • Thumbnail for Martin, Alta Frances Fox
    Martin, Alta Frances Fox by Jones-Eddy, Julie

    Alta came to homestead in the Great Divide (Moffat County) area in 1929 from Brighton, Colorado where she and her husband were farmers. They had seven children. Her husband, John Lawrence, died shortly after they arrived. They also lost a son to Mountain Fever and strep throat. Alta found that the homestead was too much to care for and moved her family to a house near the Great Divide Community Center. She and the children worked at whatever jobs they could find: cleaning the community center, working for other homesteaders, and boarded school teachers and the mailman. They raised much of their own food. The children went to school in the summer at the community school. Alta describes food handling, washing clothes, and making clothing. She also talks about home remedies. Alta died in 1984.

  • Thumbnail for Worner, Lloyd Edson, Jr.
    Worner, Lloyd Edson, Jr. by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Lloyd E. "Lew" Worner (CC class of 1942) graduated from the Missouri Military Academy in 1936 and attended Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia from 1936 to 1938. He transferred to Colorado College in January, 1940 and graduated with a B.A. degree in history in 1942. While a student at Colorado College, he was president of the student body, and of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He did graduate work in history, first at Princeton University in 1942-43, and at the University of Missouri, where he received an M.A. in 1944, and a Ph.D. in 1946. He came to Colorado College as an instructor in history in 1946, was named assistant professor in 1947, associate professor in 1950, and full professor in 1955. He served as Dean of the Faculty at Colorado College from 1955 to 1963, and then as its President from 1963 until his retirement in 1981.

  • Thumbnail for Johnson, James Alan
    Johnson, James Alan by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Professor Johnson (CC class of 1956) graduated with a major in economics. He was hired as an instructor in the Business Administration and Economics Department immediately following his graduation. After receiving his M.A. in Economics from Stanford University in 1959, he was promoted to assistant professor in 1961, associate professor in 1969, and professor in 1980. Professor Johnson's most notable contribution to the college was as registrar from the implementation of the Block Plan in 1970 to 1990. During his tenure, he initiated computerization of student and course records, an innovative point system, and a writing program across the curriculum. Following his retirement in 1995, he continued to serve as the coach of the Colorado College Forensics Team, a position he held for over 40 years.

  • Thumbnail for Morgan, Sallie Payne
    Morgan, Sallie Payne by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Sallie Payne Morgan came to Colorado College as Assistant Dean of Women in 1949, and became the Dean of Women the following year. One of her main interests was recruiting girls with good academic records and procuring funding for them. Another priority of Dean Morgan was addressing restrictive social rules for women. She describes the discussions about women's dorm hours, her effort to extend them and to lighten the punishments for infringements. She instituted an honor dorm and eventually replaced the older dorm directors with younger women. Morgan talks about memorable people: President Gill, Dean Lew Worner, Glenn Gray, George McCue, Howard Olson, and Frank Krutzke. She retired at 65 in 1957 but returned in 1964 to work as a part-time receptionist at Tutt Library staying for twelve years (retired at age 81).