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  • Thumbnail for Teaching through music in the elementary classroom
    Teaching through music in the elementary classroom by Spendlove, Mickelle

    Study of the effect of teaching social studies, math, and language arts subjects through music. Study used three 4th grade classes.

  • Thumbnail for The Music of Incarceration: A Review of Literature on Music Education in United States Prisons
    The Music of Incarceration: A Review of Literature on Music Education in United States Prisons by Huschle, Ian

    In my Capstone paper in Music, I explore the history, social contexts, and dynamics of music programs in United States prisons. I trace the history of early penal systems in the United States, focusing on the interplay of religious and philosophical ideas and the evolution of prisons, and move toward a discussion of prisons in the past two hundred years, exploring how population, race, gender, and social philosophy play into these penal systems. Throughout, I touch upon the role of music and arts in prisons, considering how creative expression has been regarded by prisoners and by prison administrations. Finally, I discuss music programs in a recent context, while proposing ways for music programs in prisons to be more effective, just, and sustainable.

  • Thumbnail for  Odetta in Concert
    Odetta in Concert by Odetta, 1930-2008

    Legendary singer, songwriter, actress and human rights activist Odetta performs as part of CC's Black History Celebration. Dubbed by Martin Luther King, Jr. as the "Queen of American Folk Music", she has been cited as the main influence of artists such as Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan, Sweet Honey in the Rock, Tracy Chapman, Carly Simon and Jewel. Her most recent album, "Gonna Let it Shine," received a 2007 Grammy nod and Real Blues Magazine referred to it as "the most important album of this generation." Recorded February 21, 2008.

  • Thumbnail for Gamer, Carlton
    Gamer, Carlton by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    A noted composer and music theorist, Professor Carlton Gamer received his Bachelors in Music from Northwestern University in 1950, and his Masters from Boston University in 1951. He came to Colorado College first in 1953 as an accompanist for the dance program. From 1954 through 1960, he was a full-time instructor in the music department. He became assistant professor in 1960; associate professor in 1966; and served as a full professor from 1974 until his retirement in 1994. Besides his talents as a composer and teacher of music, Professor Gamer also has had a great interest in Asian culture and philosophy and mathematical thought. A conscientious objector, Professor Gamer counseled many young men about the draft.

  • Thumbnail for Music Capstone Project Documentation: Great Animal
    Music Capstone Project Documentation: Great Animal by Sashihara, Gabriel Thomas

    Running about 37 minutes over the course of ten tracks, Great Animal (2017) is an instrumental rock album recorded by my group, Most Bodacious, and engineered, mixed, and mastered by Jacob Folk. The following documentation will cover Great Animal’s composition, production, post-production, publication, distribution, and overall significance in five corresponding sections. The main purpose of this paper is not only to introduce and promote my first major work, but also to provide tangible results of my musical studies at The Colorado College (CC) and, furthermore, to purport individual engagement and discovery through the record.

  • Thumbnail for Homecoming Concert Poster [2012-10-12]. Poster.
    Homecoming Concert Poster [2012-10-12]. Poster. by Colorado College. Dept. of Music

    Poster created for Homecoming concert October 12, 2012 of performances by Music Department ensemble groups: Bluegrass Ensemble, Bowed Piano Ensemble, Gamelan Tunjung Sari, Jazz Trio, Student Performances, and Woodwind Quintet.

  • Thumbnail for Leviathan [2007-2008 v. 33 no. 2 Winter]
    Leviathan [2007-2008 v. 33 no. 2 Winter]

    The Leviathan is CC's student magazine for poetry, prose, visual art and music.

  • Thumbnail for Choice, engagement, and reflective practices in the music classroom : the realization of independent musicianship
    Choice, engagement, and reflective practices in the music classroom : the realization of independent musicianship by Weidmann, Lindsay

    If students are given the opportunity to explore their own musical interests using a variety of learning strategies, how will it affect their overall self-efficacy and engagement in their own musical development? This question is explored through a learning unit created for 8th grade general music classes where the students experienced varying levels of choice in their musical learning. Students wrote reflections before, after, and during the unit. These reflective journals were the main source of data collection. Pre-unit reflective surveys focused on musical interests, past learning experiences both in and out of school, current musical goals, and current learning preferences. The unit’s central activities were for students to learn three different songs using a variety of learning methods and then write evaluative and reflective responses after each song performance. Post-unit reflective surveys focused on any changes in students’ motivation, confidence, cognitive engagement (evaluation), and emotional engagement (‘feeling’ statements). All surveys and reflective journals included qualitative data and quantitative data. Results show if students are given the opportunity to learn what they want while utilizing learning methods they prefer, it will not only engage them emotionally and cognitively but will also contribute positively to their overall self-efficacy in the music classroom. Overwhelmingly, students claimed the unit increased their overall motivation and confidence in learning to play music and cited their own cognitive engagement and emotional engagement as their reasons why. Other questions, observations, and implications raised by the study are also discussed.

  • Thumbnail for Artificial Authority: Our Relationship to Music and Genre Labeling
  • Thumbnail for God's in the Garage
    God's in the Garage by Rock, Kendall

    God’s in the Garage is an explorative documentary about the challenges that musicians who are involved in Christian churches face as they struggle between their faith and their artistry. The audience follows Colorado Springs musician Brian Wight as he decides between a comfortable lifestyle through a church job and his artistry, with Colorado and Seattle artists weaving thoughts and music throughout.

  • Thumbnail for Seay, Albert
    Seay, Albert by Finley, Judith Reid, 1936-

    Albert Seay came to Colorado College in 1953, after completing his dissertation at Yale. Dr. Seay was professor of music and head of the music department at Colorado College until 1982, when he retired. He established the Colorado College Music Press in 1955, which focuses on publishing translations and transcriptions of music. His interview discusses the growth of the Music Department, the Music Press, and the changes in music students during his career.

  • Thumbnail for Musical matters - A .C. Pearson
    Musical matters - A .C. Pearson by Pearson, Albert C.

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 7, Musical matters - A. C. Pearson include: 1 17-page, handwritten letter signed by Albert C. Pearson; 1 envelope marked “Letter on Musical Matters, by A. C. Pearson, July 31, 1901,” containing mostly biographical material.

  • Thumbnail for Music in Colorado Springs - Leah Ehrich
    Music in Colorado Springs - Leah Ehrich by Ehrich, Leah Lucile

    Historic documentation of life at the turn of the 19th century created by residents of Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1901 for the citizens of 2001. Under the direction of Louis R. Ehrich, a prominent 19th century businessman, the items were sealed in a chest which was stored in various buildings on the Colorado College campus until the official opening January 1, 2001 at the Charles Leaming Tutt Library. Contents of Ms349, Fd 74, Music in Colorado Springs - Leah Ehrich: 1 23-page, handwritten letter, dated August 1, 1901, addressed “To the people of Colorado Springs in the year 2001:” signed by Leah Lucile Ehrich; 1 b&w photo “Leah Lucile Ehrich and twelve year old sister, Alma Louise Ehrich”; 4 printed brochures of the Colorado Springs Musical Club for the seasons 1897- 98, 1898-99, 1899-1900, and 1900-01; 1 printed copy of the “Constitution and By-laws of the Colorado Springs Musical Club”; 5 printed programs for January through May of the Colorado Springs Musical Club.

  • Thumbnail for Leviathan [2006-2007 v. 32 n. 1 Fall]
  • Thumbnail for Modern Sounding Music Facing Backwards: A Conflicted Charles Ives
    Modern Sounding Music Facing Backwards: A Conflicted Charles Ives by Campbell, Andrew Russell

    For my senior capstone project, I shall examine Charles Ives’s musical and philosophical place in American music history by way of his messy relationship with Romanticism and the European tradition. While striving to create a distinct American music braced with American philosophies and ideals, Ives liberally appropriated features of nineteenth century (Romantic) music and thought in his work. The first questions to address are related to influence: What nineteenth-century music did Ives hear throughout his composing life? What songs or pieces did he model while studying with Horatio Parker at Yale? What did he see in Beethoven as the ideal composer of the previous century? Next, I shall address his ideological and musical conflicts: How could Ives reconcile both his New England Protestant morality alongside his apparently “Transcendentalist” themes in his music and writings? More specifically, how does Ives’s second piano sonata, the “Concord” Sonata, use Romantic musical devices and ideological themes to produce a “modern” musical language? Finally, was Ives’s music an inevitable consequence of European Romanticism? Where does he fit in American music history? To answer these questions, I will read Ives’s own writings, his Memos and Essays, along with his correspondence with other composers and teachers. Ives scholars such as J. Peter Burkholder and Frank Rossiter will contribute, in large part, the secondary sources in my paper. In addition, I will analyze Ives’s Second Piano Sonata for both Romantic and Modern elements to trace influences beyond the well researched quoted melodies. The typical scholarly discussion around Ives’s musical and philosophical roots gives too much credit to his pioneering of American modernism and not enough attention to the European tradition from which he worked. My topic will contribute a more frank and less hagiographical view of Ives and his ideas’ conflicted nature.

  • Thumbnail for The Role of Song in Social Movements
  • Thumbnail for Musical Editions: The past, present, and future.