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10 hits

  • Thumbnail for Taking out plaster murals: G22
    Taking out plaster murals: G22

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: G22

  • Thumbnail for Kuaua. Mural: G20
    Kuaua. Mural: G20

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: G20

  • Thumbnail for Kuaua. Ceremonial. Murals room: G23
    Kuaua. Ceremonial. Murals room: G23

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: G23

  • Thumbnail for Kuaua. Copies of the murals: G24
    Kuaua. Copies of the murals: G24

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: G24

  • Thumbnail for Kuaua, mural in situ: I63
    Kuaua, mural in situ: I63

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: I63

  • Thumbnail for Awatovi. Geometric mural: I58
    Awatovi. Geometric mural: I58

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: I58

  • Thumbnail for Kuaua. Murals mounted in a workshop: G21
    Kuaua. Murals mounted in a workshop: G21

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: G21

  • Thumbnail for Awatovi. Large Mural: I59
    Awatovi. Large Mural: I59

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: I59

  • Thumbnail for Awatovi. Mural: I57
    Awatovi. Mural: I57

    Southwestern Ruins, Villages, Pueblos and Missions, 1896-1940: I57

  • Thumbnail for The Choreography of Reclamation: Space, Art and Resistance in the Southwest
    The Choreography of Reclamation: Space, Art and Resistance in the Southwest by Day, Marin

    This Senior Thesis is centered around three spaces in the Southwest of the United States— the U.S. Mexico Border (in The Rio Grand Valley, Texas and San Diego, California), The Mission District (San Francisco, CA) and Chicano Park (Barrio Logan, CA). This Thesis in organized in three chapters— one for each place. These spaces are united by their significance to those who identify as Chicano— a Mexican-American identity with political roots. I recount my experiences in these spaces— what I saw, smelled, felt, heard— how bodies moved, connected, and engaged— what my presence meant/means. I then investigate the dynamics of each space— focusing particularly on the power, subversion, and resistance of art. In discussion, I draw from scholars’ work on performance, body and spacial politics as well as my own experience as a dancer and choreographer. I am interested in investigating space and bodies. I want to understand the meanings these entities have, take on, or are forcibly given. I argue that in the three spaces I focus on this Thesis, we witness what I call “a choreography of reclamation”. This is a process of reordering, challenging and shifting space and the entities within both physically and emotionally.