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  • Thumbnail for The healing of America: making sense of health care politics
    The healing of America: making sense of health care politics by Reid, T. R.

    T. R. Reid, a prizewinning Washington Post reporter and the author of several books, including "The Healing of America" and "The United States of Europe," is a frequent guest on NPR and has narrated and produced several PBS documentaries. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded March 4, 2010.

  • Thumbnail for The Value of Incorporating Anthropology into Chronic Illness Treatment in the United States with an Analysis of Heart Disease
    The Value of Incorporating Anthropology into Chronic Illness Treatment in the United States with an Analysis of Heart Disease by Loper, Ayla

    The United States spends more money than any other high-income country on healthcare but has poorer outcomes in key healthcare measures. Integrating holistic anthropological theories and tools such as ethnography or evolutionary approaches can help medical practitioners deliver more effective care when faced with pressures and difficulties that occur when operating in the United States healthcare system. This incorporation of anthropology with biomedical care is specifically pertinent to chronic disease treatment. Here, I suggest anthropological theories and tools to improve the treatment of chronic illnesses. At the end of the theoretical discussion, I examine these issues with a focus on heart disease. Heart disease treatment in the United States is an example of a disease that could benefit greatly from the employment of an anthropological lens. I found that heart disease treatment in the United States does not cater treatment to individual cases or consider a variety of factors, even though heart disease commonly involves lifestyle factors.

  • Thumbnail for Health care cost control and the Affordable Care Act
    Health care cost control and the Affordable Care Act by Valeta, Matthew David Erisman

    A political science thesis examining the impact of the 2010 Affordable Care Act on the cost of health care in the United States. The incentives of the participants in the health care market are analyzed in order to explain why health care costs continue to grow. This thesis also looks at the why the Affordable Care Act became law and provides a conclusion on the likely success of the Affordable Care Act at controlling health care cost growth.

  • Thumbnail for Determining the Impact of Bundled Payments on Patient Satisfaction Levels: a Regressive Analysis on a Cost Saving Method Within Healthcare
    Determining the Impact of Bundled Payments on Patient Satisfaction Levels: a Regressive Analysis on a Cost Saving Method Within Healthcare by Zhang, Dennis

    Rising healthcare costs have prompted healthcare systems and public policymakers to begin to consider alternative payment structures. However, with the recent implementation of the Affordable Care Act and other healthcare mandates, patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly important topic that will soon influence hospital compensation. An OLS regression was used to investigate if a new method of cost saving known as bundled payments has any impact on patient satisfaction levels. Using panel data on patient satisfaction and on healthcare systems that participated in an experimental bundled payment program, the results suggest that bundled payment programs have no significant impact on patient satisfaction levels. While there are notable data issues that frame the interpretation of the results somewhat, this study indicates that bundled payment structures can preserve care delivery.

  • Thumbnail for  Hospital price variations : paying for the illusion of quality
    Hospital price variations : paying for the illusion of quality by Munyao, Benjamin

    Existing literature on hospital pricing and price variation is split on whether price differentials in hospital billing are demand or supply led. To harmonize this literature, we use data from the Medicare Hospital Compare website to evaluate the interaction between demand and supply factors that influence hospital pricing structure. We use consumers’ net willingness-to-pay (net WTP) as the dependent variable to analyze how providers exploit factors that enable a provider to charge high prices to consumers. We find that high prices are reflective of the perceived quality but find no relationship with the actual quality of care. In line with previous literature, our analysis shows no evidence of cross- subsidization between inpatient DRGs. However, we find no interaction of factors that could adequately explain the full extent of observed variation in provider prices. We conclude that the question, “Should I buy here or keep driving?” is complex and cannot be answered by a simple analysis of which healthcare provider is cheaper.

  • Thumbnail for  Applying difference-in-differences to measure the effect of Medicare preventive medicine policy
    Applying difference-in-differences to measure the effect of Medicare preventive medicine policy by Brody, Patrick

    In this study I examine the effectiveness of the Medicare Modernization Act’s inclusion of preventive cholesterol screenings with no copay or deductible to Medicare Part B beneficiaries. The screenings were included in the MMA to increase usage of cholesterol screenings among Medicare beneficiaries. Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, I employ a difference-in-differences model to isolate the change in screening rate among Medicare beneficiaries. Using individuals not covered by Medicare as a baseline, I find that in three age restricted samples the rate of screening among Medicare beneficiaries either decrease or keep a constant screening rate, relative to the control group. Overall, the MMA’s cholesterol screening policies are not effective in increasing the rate of cholesterol screenings utilized.

  • Thumbnail for The link between physician payments, physician behavior and patient outcomes
    The link between physician payments, physician behavior and patient outcomes by Shatzer, Derek Michael

    Understanding how physician behavior impacts patient outcomes has become a central concern in literature relating to the economics of healthcare. Using data from the 2010 U.S. Census and 2016 Hospital Compare Data, this paper analyzes how physician behavior impacts five different patient outcomes. We use the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores that a patient will submit following their hospital visit, as our proxy for physician behavior. We find that the HCAHPS scores that are associated with physician behavior such as, communication with physician, communication about medication, and discharge information are all statistically significant in impacting patient outcomes. Previous literature has proven that physician payment schemes influence physician behavior. Our study was able to prove that physician behavior impacts patient outcomes. Ultimately we conclude that physician payment schemes influence patient outcomes.

  • Thumbnail for A conversation with George McGovern
    A conversation with George McGovern by McGovern, George S. (George Stanley), 1922-

    Colorado College presents “A Conversation With Senator George S. McGovern,” the 1972 Democratic presidential nominee, three-term U.S. senator and two-term congressman, food and agriculture ambassador to the United Nations, and decorated B-24 pilot in the Second World War. McGovern discusses his book, "Abraham Lincoln," as well as current topics ranging from Afghanistan and Iraq to health care and world hunger. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded September 15, 2009.