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  • Thumbnail for Compelling and necessary momentum : a recent timeline in open access
    Compelling and necessary momentum : a recent timeline in open access by Gaetz, Ivan

    Ivan Gaetz presents a six week timeline of developments in the open access movement.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona
    Collaboration for a 21st century archives : connecting university archives with the library’s information technology professiona by Lawrimore, Erin

    As communication technologies change, so do the records being produced and acquired by the archival repositories tasked with documenting society. This article, written from the perspective of a University Archivist, discusses the need for collaboration between archivists and information technology professionals in a university library in order to manage the university’s born-digital archival records. Using specific examples of collaborative projects of University Archives and the Electronic Resources and Information Technology (ERIT) department in the University Libraries of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the article makes specific recommendations for overcoming challenges related to professional jargon and work practices shared by archivists and information technologists to produce a successful collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Who is sitting at the reference desk? : the ever-changing concept of staffing the reference desk at the Bio-Medical Library
    Who is sitting at the reference desk? : the ever-changing concept of staffing the reference desk at the Bio-Medical Library by Aho, Melissa K. , Beschnett, Anne M. , Reimer, Emily Y.

    Providing excellent reference service at the University of Minnesota’s Bio-Medical Library has always been a source of pride and a goal to those of us who work at the reference desk. With tightening budgets and shrinking staff numbers, who works at the reference desk is drastically changing. The Bio-Medical Library has always been in a unique position to offer the opportunity of working at the reference desk to staff members across all departments, including those who at other libraries would not normally be given the option to staff the desk. From circulation staff to technical services staff to our fee-based services staff (InfoNOW) to our current project of training a few undergraduate student workers, the Bio-Medical Library staff has created a unique reference desk environment. This article will discuss the many different ways the Bio-Medical Library keeps the reference desk functioning with its unique and multi-departmental staff.

  • Thumbnail for Peers don’t let peers perish : encouraging research and scholarship among junior library faculty
    Peers don’t let peers perish : encouraging research and scholarship among junior library faculty by Cirasella, Jill , Smale, Maura A.

    Traditional mentoring has many benefits, but peer mentoring can also offer a valuable support structure along the road to tenure. The Junior Faculty Research Roundtable (JFRR) is a peer-mentoring group for junior library faculty at the colleges and graduate schools of the City University of New York (CUNY). Created to encourage junior library faculty in their scholarly endeavors, JFRR organizes professional development events and facilitates in-person and online conversations on research, writing, and publishing. Now three years old, the group has transformed a large number of scattered junior library faculty into a supportive community of scholars.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative marketing for electronic resources :  a project report and discussion
    Collaborative marketing for electronic resources : a project report and discussion by Kennedy, Marie R.

    This article reports on the design and findings of a project concerning the feasibility of a collaborative model to benchmark the marketing of electronic resources in institutions of higher education. This international project gathered 100 libraries to move in lockstep through the process of a typical marketing cycle that included running a brief marketing campaign and reporting findings to each other. The findings show good reasons and strong support for this kind of model.

  • Thumbnail for  Implementing a promotional process for academic librarians
    Implementing a promotional process for academic librarians by Euliano, Bridget , Lewis, Leslie , Behary, Robert

    This article describes how the librarians at Duquesne University’s Gumberg Library developed a system for the promotion of academic librarians. While some of the details in the article may apply only to the faculty at Gumberg Library, the thesis of this article is that other academic librarians wishing to develop similar promotional systems might benefit from what we have learned. Library faculty at other institutions should be aware of the practical aspects of aligning the library promotional path with established university structures, working with existing library culture, and making provisions for the initial cohort to work with the new guidelines. This article will be useful for librarians with faculty status who plan to implement a new promotion process or refine an existing system.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Building bridges : connecting faculty,  students, and the college library
    Review of Building bridges : connecting faculty, students, and the college library by Andersen, Patricia

    Patricia Andersen reviews Monty L. McAdoo's, "Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library." Building Bridges gives in-depth, practical advice for librarians, new or not so new to information literacy, with tips on how to both interact with faculty and students to design successful assignments.

  • Thumbnail for Outreach : what works?
    Outreach : what works? by Ke, Irene , Essinger, Catherine

    This article reports on the design and findings of a project concerning the feasibility of a collaborative model to benchmark the marketing of electronic resources in institutions of higher education. This international project gathered 100 libraries to move in lockstep through the process of a typical marketing cycle that included running a brief marketing campaign and reporting findings to each other. The findings show good reasons and strong support for this kind of model.

  • Thumbnail for Editorial introduction : telling stories
    Editorial introduction : telling stories by Gaetz, Ivan

    This issue marks the start of Collaborative Librarianship’s third year of publication. The articles presented here reveal the great richness of creative thought moving librarians to develop intriguing and exciting ways of working together and of reaching out to persons and groups outside the profession of librarianship.

  • Thumbnail for Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum :  building alliances to support a paradigm shift
    Academic librarians and the sustainability curriculum : building alliances to support a paradigm shift by Charney, Madeleine

    Sustainability is a fast evolving movement in higher education demonstrated by a proliferation of academic programs, co-curricular initiatives, and campus projects. Sustainability is now viewed as vital to the mission of many institutions of higher education, creating a paradigm shift that librarians can help advance with their collective interdisciplinary expertise. A review of LibGuides (online resource guides) showed that academic librarians are involved with sustainability efforts on many campuses and have a role in shaping curriculum-related activities. The author administered a survey to creators of sustainability LibGuides during the spring of 2011, posting the survey on library listservs as well. Librarians returned 112 survey responses that illustrated their engagement in sustainability activities through the forging of campus partnerships with administrators, faculty, staff from the Office of Sustainability, and library colleagues. Telephone interviews conducted with 24 of the respondents showed librarians’ wide-ranging professional interest in sustainability, and their initiatives to promote its cause, including creating resources, collections, exhibits, and events; library instruction; co-teaching with faculty; serving on sustainability committees; and collaborating with sustainability faculty and staff. However, both the survey and the interviews suggest that librarians would benefit from increased collaboration and knowledge of work undertaken elsewhere. Moreover, as the needs of students and faculty studying sustainability increase, libraries need to appoint librarians with special responsibilities in this field. Included is the author’s experience as the Sustainability Studies Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and her engagement in professional development activities related to sustainability. Best practices for librarians to advance sustainability efforts are offered.

  • Thumbnail for Library collaboration : international perspectives : an interview with Dr. Shimelis Assefa, Associate Professor, Library and Inf
    Library collaboration : international perspectives : an interview with Dr. Shimelis Assefa, Associate Professor, Library and Inf by Lee, Janet

    In conversation with Janet Lee, Dean of Libraries, Regis University, Dr. Shimelis Assefa, University of Denver, discusses aspects of library collaboration from an international perspective that cover both challenges and opportunities. Insights on collaboration in library science education are also offered.

  • Thumbnail for Directory of open access journals : a bibliometric study of library and information science
    Directory of open access journals : a bibliometric study of library and information science by Thavamani, Kotti

    This paper presents a bibliometric study of library-focused journals represented in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). A total of 151 library and information science journals were examined related to a number of issues: subject-specific distribution of library journals, interdisciplinary aspects, country of origin, language-used and other language characteristics, numbers of titles first appearing in given years, publication fees, the existence of license agreements, and the types of organizations having journals in the Directory that focus on libraries or librarianship.

  • Thumbnail for Review of “The bookless library,” New Republic
    Review of “The bookless library,” New Republic by Mackey, Ellen

    Ellen Mackey reviews Princeton history professor David Bell’s article “The Bookless Library” http://www.newrepublic.com/article/books-and-arts/magazine/david-bell-future-bookless-library#, July 12, 2002, accessed July 31, 2012. In this article, the question is asked, “What role will libraries have when patrons no longer need to go to them to consult or borrow books?”

  • Thumbnail for  Review of “Social networking tools for academic libraries”
    Review of “Social networking tools for academic libraries” by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews the article, "Social Networking Tools for Academic Libraries." The authors of this paper, Samuel Kai-Wah Chu and Helen S. Du, investigate the use of social media in academic libraries across the globe.

  • Thumbnail for  Collaborative Librarianship : five years and counting
    Collaborative Librarianship : five years and counting by Gaetz, Ivan

    Ivan Gaetz, co-editor of Collaborative Librarianship, reflects as the journal completes five full years of publishing. Not only does the journal publish articles on collaboration, it also represents in practical terms some of the best practices in library collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Evolving in collaboration : electronic thesis and dissertation workflows in North Carolina
    Evolving in collaboration : electronic thesis and dissertation workflows in North Carolina by Early, Mary G. , Taber, Ann Marie

    Thirty-seven colleges and universities in North Carolina offer advanced degrees, and most require a thesis or dissertation. The websites of thirteen (35%) indicate they accept or require electronic submission of dissertations and/or theses (ETD). How do these institutions handle the interdepartmental communication and collaboration needs of ETD programs? To begin answering this question, this study examines current practices among ETD administrators in North Carolina and in current national literature, paying special attention to communication, collaboration, workflows, and divisions of labor. The literature review surveys current (since 2003) library and higher education articles on topics related to collaboration, workflows, and divisions of labor in ETD programs. Then the authors use a brief web survey (sixteen questions) that was emailed to twenty-three individuals identified on institutional websites as being involved in the ETD program. Fifty percent of recipients completed the survey, and the results tend to support common themes found in the literature: ETD depositories require a great variety of skill sets and thus will involve multiple departments; libraries and graduate schools are primary players, but not exclusively, in ETD workflows; and communication and collaboration between departments are important from start to finish.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborating with library course pages and Facebook : exploring new opportunities
    Collaborating with library course pages and Facebook : exploring new opportunities by Howe, Andy , Haycock, Laurel

    Technologies like library course pages and Facebook offer new opportunities for librarians and faculty to collaborate, integrate library content and services into student work spaces, and support and expand student learning. During spring semester 2011, a library course page was developed for a graduate-level education class and sent to the instructor for review. That led to comment and expansion of content on the course page. After this interaction, the librarian joined the course Facebook group to explore this venue as an embedded librarian. This article includes the librarian’s and instructor’s perspectives about this work. Collaborative use of social networking tools offers promise for a deeper and a wider range of learning opportunities by potentially enlarging the range of participants in the learning process and by moving class conversations beyond the limits of traditional course management systems.

  • Thumbnail for Creating NISO’s library physical delivery recommended practices
    Creating NISO’s library physical delivery recommended practices by Pronevitz, Gregory , Horton, Valerie

    The volume of materials shipped between libraries and branches has grown very quickly. This growth caused service and budget problems for libraries, library networks, and commercial couriers. NISO formed a working group comprised of practitioners from various types of libraries and systems to recommend practices to improve performance and reduce costs for moving physical materials between libraries. The recommended practices include an introduction and sections related to management, automation, the physical move, and the future. In addition to describing the recommended practices, the authors briefly review the cause of the growth in library delivery volume, i.e., the development of patron-placed hold capability in integrated library systems and the issues and reactions in the library delivery community resulting from the rapid growth, as well as prospects for a future with declining delivery volume.

  • Thumbnail for E-book workflow from inquiry to access : facing the challenges to implementing e-book access at the University of Nevada, Reno
    E-book workflow from inquiry to access : facing the challenges to implementing e-book access at the University of Nevada, Reno by Beisler, Amalia , Kurt, Lisa

    As e-book holdings in academic libraries increase, libraries must face the challenge of how to manage the acquisition and access of both individual and package e-book titles. While libraries have developed work-flows to effectively handle electronic journal holdings and packages, e-books do not fit neatly into those models. An e-book workflow shares facets of both monographic and electronic resource acquisition and access, with both title-level and package acquisition and management issues. This article will explore how a cross-departmental team in the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries collaborated to analyze and refine the workflow for the e-book lifecycle, from the point of inquiry through acquisition, access management, and end of life.

  • Thumbnail for Again a cottage industry
    Again a cottage industry by Gaetz, Ivan

    If Gaetz interprets correctly the views of Jason Epstein, elder statesman of the publishing world, Collaborative Librarianship in fact takes its place in the rebirthing of a cottage industry. The Random House College Dictionary defines “cottage industry” as, “an industry in which the product is made in a self-employed worker’s home (in contrast with a factory).” Beginning in the 1450's in homes and shops, printing and publishing progressed through the centuries to become enormous, multinational corporate empires. Now, all that is changing. With the emergence of the internet, social networking and mobile technologies of one kind or another, a new paradigm comes into play, a new model described by Epstein as a cottage industry long forgotten in the big business of publishing—and you are invited to be a part of it! Collaborative Librarianship invites you to become directly involved in this new cottage industry as authors, editors, reviewers, readers, responders—working where you are, anywhere in the world, creatively, autonomously, and exhibiting much diversity—interacting with information and knowledge. You have an opportunity to participate in meaningful ways in this new world of publishing anticipated by Jason Epstein.

  • Thumbnail for JISC collections : post-cancellation entitlement registry scoping project
    JISC collections : post-cancellation entitlement registry scoping project by Bascones, Magaly

    Since e-journals were first introduced into library collections, Post-Cancellation Access (PCA) rights and perpetual access have been a concern for librarians. Perpetual access concerns are being addressed by initiatives such as LOCKSS, CLOCKSS, PORTICO, among others. The same cannot be said for PCA rights. We haven’t yet seen any commercial, institutional or community initiative and work directed at addressing the problem. It is within this context that the JISC Collections: Post-Cancellation Entitlement Registry Scoping Project has been designed and implemented. It has explored in some detail what would happen if an institution wanted to ascertain from a publisher what its PCA rights were. The findings of interest to publishers and libraries are detailed in this article.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Without a net : librarians bridging the digital divide
    Review : Without a net : librarians bridging the digital divide by Stoddart, Rick

    Rick Stoddart reviews the book, "Without a Net : Librarians Bridging the Digital Divide." In this review, Stoddard states that Jessamyn West "has written a sorely needed primer on the practical issues many libraries may encounter related to the digital divide and their patrons."

  • Thumbnail for Library collaboration – exploring new business models : an interview with Marvin Pollard
    Library collaboration – exploring new business models : an interview with Marvin Pollard by Pollard, Marvin , Tucker, Cory, 1970-

    In the past few years, academic libraries have faced many significant challenges. Due to the financial crisis, the cuts to library collections have caused an evolution in the philosophy of collecting, accessing, and delivering information. Financial constraints have resulted considerations of a “just-in-time” collection philosophy, where libraries have explored new models of collecting information and delivering content to their patrons. Collaborative Librarianship caught up with Marvin Pollard to discuss this issue.

  • Thumbnail for Snapshot of library collaboration
    Snapshot of library collaboration by Gaetz, Ivan

    Editor, Ivan Gaetz is struck by the depth and diversity of collaboration represented in this issue of Collaborative Librarianship.

  • Thumbnail for Supporting faculty research through collaborative digital projects : the Mongolian Altai inventory
    Supporting faculty research through collaborative digital projects : the Mongolian Altai inventory by Estlund, Karen , Simic, Julia , Hierholzer, Kirstin

    This article provides an overview of a collaborative project between the University of Oregon Libraries, Infographics Lab, and an Art History professor to create a virtual research guide, Archaeology and Landscape in the Altai Mountains of Mongolia, and accompanying digital image archives. This project serves a model for preserving humanities data and creates a collaborative strategy for presenting faculty research output in a new media environment. In addition to the typical challenges faced in digital projects, the specialized nature of the content and multiple participants with varied areas of expertise added additional challenges. Equipped with lessons learned, a new model can be created for libraries to support and preserve faculty research.