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  • Thumbnail for Re-conceiving entrepreneurship for libraries : collaboration and the anatomy of a conference
    Re-conceiving entrepreneurship for libraries : collaboration and the anatomy of a conference by Scanlon, Mary G., 1955- , Crumpton, Michael A.

    For librarians who have worked in the field and have become innovative out of necessity, developing and creating entrepreneurial activities are not unusual. Perhaps recognizing and celebrating those achievements could change common perspectives on the entrepreneurial abilities of librarians. This idea launched the collaborative efforts of two universities to demonstrate this to be so. The libraries at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, successfully collaborated on the planning and execution of a conference to celebrate entrepreneurism within the field of librarianship. In doing so, each organization was able to promote its unique talents and give signature to the notion that librarians can be, and in fact are, entrepreneurial. The collaborative value found in this project was derived from our sense of fulfillment of our social responsibility and of celebrating entrepreneurship within the profession. This conference serves as an example of embedded collaboration versus simple logistics, and the conference planning team now looks forward to future endeavors.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries
    Review of Interdisciplinarity and academic libraries by O'Neill, Ann L.

    Ann L. O’Neill reviews, "Interdisciplinarity and Academic Libraries." This book examines the definition of interdisciplinarity and the related terms of multidisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinarity and how these can, and have, affected the work in academic libraries. The ten essays range from definitions and history of interdisciplinarity to the work implications in specific areas of today’s academic libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Outreach : what works?
    Outreach : what works? by Essinger, Catherine , Ke, Irene

    This article reports on the design and findings of a project concerning the feasibility of a collaborative model to benchmark the marketing of electronic resources in institutions of higher education. This international project gathered 100 libraries to move in lockstep through the process of a typical marketing cycle that included running a brief marketing campaign and reporting findings to each other. The findings show good reasons and strong support for this kind of model.

  • Thumbnail for Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar
    Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar by Otto, Justin , Mutschler, Chas. V., (Charles Vincent), 1955- , Victor, Paul, Jr.

    This article discusses a successful collaboration between multiple subject specialist librarians, the University Archivist and a faculty member teaching an undergraduate course in documents-based social science research. This collaborative partnership allowed for each subject specialist to expose students to specific information literacy skills they needed to be successful in their class. The authors used pre- and post-assessments to gauge student comfort level in conducting library research, as well as a rubric to assess the annotated bibliography of a student’s final research paper. The data from these assessment tools are analyzed and the results discussed. The data indicates that students benefited from the specialized instruction they received.

  • Thumbnail for The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi
    The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    In order for academic libraries to continue to demonstrate their value in an age of accountability, developing strong collaborations is essential. Collaborations provide a first rate opportunity for librarians not only to demonstrate their value to the institution and the research practices of the faculty but to facilitate teaching students how to navigate an increasingly diverse and at times confusing information environment driven by access to several technologies. For students entering college, learning early how to navigate the library and its resources can become an important element to their academic success. Inclusion of the library faculty into the development and teaching modules of student orientations and first year seminars, such as the ones designed at the Bronx Community College of the City of New York, provide a great step in establishing our value in promoting retention and graduation.

  • Thumbnail for “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration
    “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration by Gardner, Carolyn Caffrey , White-Farnham, Jamie

    The authors describe difficulties pertaining to discipline-specific discourse and identity among collaborators during the process of revising the information literacy component of a first-year writing program. Hardesty’s term “faculty culture” offers a frame through which to understand resistance and tension among otherwise engaged faculty and situates this experience within the uncomfortable history between faculty and librarians who may be perceived as “inauthentic” faculty. The authors suggest ways to improve communication between librarians and writing program faculty when collaborating on infor-mation literacy instruction.

  • Thumbnail for The librarian and the collaborative design of effective library  assignments : recommendations for daculty on question design fo
    The librarian and the collaborative design of effective library assignments : recommendations for daculty on question design fo by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    The success of library research assignments depends to some extent on the quality of the research question posed to students. Librarians can help teaching faculty craft more effective research assignments through intentional partnerships where librarians discuss with faculty how to pose well-structured research questions, what library resources are available to support the research and what a faculty member expects a student to learn from the exercise.

  • Thumbnail for Enhancing collaboration through the Scholarship  of Teaching and Learning
    Enhancing collaboration through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning by Perini, Michael

    The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is a discipline that emphasizes instructional development and enhanced student learning through the dissemination of practitioner theory and experience. The discipline, however, primarily considers the role and perspectives of higher education and K-12 faculty. Yet SoTL also has pragmatic implications for librarians as it promotes instructional improvement, collaborative research, networking, and professional development across the academy.

  • Thumbnail for  Review of Managing research data
    Review of Managing research data by Salo, Dorothea, 1972-

    Dorothea Salo reviews "Managing Research Data" edited by Graham Pryor. This volume aims at providing a high-level snapshot of the current state of the art in research-data policy, planning, management, and preservation. While few readers will find occasion to read every piece included, almost everyone in research libraries will find one or more articles of considerable interest.

  • Thumbnail for Review of “Can library use enhance intercultural education?”
    Review of “Can library use enhance intercultural education?” by Sagàs, Jimena , Sagas, Jimena

    Jimena Sagàs reviews Joron Pihl's article, "Can Library Use Enhance Intercultural Education?" This paper places the library in the spotlight as a potential resource to address the challenging issue of providing a quality education for students regardless of social, linguistic and cultural background.

  • Thumbnail for How super-consortia saved our libraries from the forces of evil…and themselves
  • Thumbnail for Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development
    Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development by Shen, Lan

    Librarian-faculty relations are essential to library collection development. This paper discusses, first of all, the reasons for the customary disconnect between librarians and faculty in light of their different priorities, visions, expertise, and status. In an attempt to bridge the librarian-faculty separation, a horizontal strategy is proposed focusing on financial collaborations between the library and other academic departments on campus, such as adopting the balanced budget, fair and rotated resource allocation, and prioritized investment through providing a General Reserve Fund. A vertical strategy is also proposed defined as an organizational and professional partnership through three different vertical levels, namely, the university, unit (department/program), and individual levels. At the university level, while the collaboration needs to cover the areas of book selection, evaluation, preservation, weeding, and cancellation, it should also rely on campus-wide workshops as an effective way of improving collection development and professional training. At the unit level, in addition to the department liaison model, it is advisable to organize specific forums focusing on the special needs required by different academic programs and departments. Individual level collaboration is critical to achieving the proposed goals as all institutional strategies must rely on individual efforts. Librarians should provide individual, informal, and customized outreach services.

  • Thumbnail for Review : The social factor : innovate, ignite, and win through mass collaboration and social networking
    Review : The social factor : innovate, ignite, and win through mass collaboration and social networking by Lakatos, Holly

    Holly Lakotos reviews the book, "The Social Factor: Innovate, Ignite, and Win through Mass Collaboration and Social Networking." This book written by Maria Azua, IBM's vice president of Cloud Computing Enablement, seeks to demystify these tools and other social networking applications. Although the work purports to describe “how to choose and implement the right social networking solutions” in reality, it is an introduction to social networking concepts that may help librarians improve information literacy efforts across all patron groups.

  • Thumbnail for Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events
    Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events by Wirth, Andrea A.

    Oregon State University (OSU) Libraries participated in Open Access (OA) Week in 2009 and 2010. In order to expand the range of events offered, the committee members assigned to program planning looked for opportunities to work with partners beyond the library. The collaborative activities developed through these partnerships created settings for in-depth conversations among librarians, faculty, and students about scholarly communication issues. Subject librarians’ relationships with their departments provided opportunities to host events in venues other than the library, which helped, facilitate access to a diverse audience. An established cooperative relationship with the University of Oregon made it possible to provide additional presentations to the OSU community. An evaluation of the quantity and quality of contacts made during OA Week suggests the collaborative activities enriched these outreach activities and that participation in OA Week is worthwhile for OSU Libraries to continue.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative project development in the creation of an interdepartmental digitization workflow
    Collaborative project development in the creation of an interdepartmental digitization workflow by Prilop, Valerie , German, Elizabeth M. , Westbrook, R. Niccole

    Creating workflows that involve the work of multiple departments within a large organization can be challenging, especially when the procedure itself is complex and involves a number of stakeholders. This paper describes and evaluates a collaborative project to develop an interdepartmental workflow for the digitization of unique library materials in a mid-sized academic library. The project includes an automated project management and materials tracking system. Project development involved three separate departments with different reporting channels. In order to navigate this difficulty and manage the large size of the project, a visual planning technique that included graphical representations of current and proposed workflows, as well as implementation timelines, was used. This visual planning technique allowed the project team to clearly organize their thoughts and plans and proved helpful in soliciting buy-in from stakeholders. The paper will outline the collaborative planning process, addressing the rewards and challenges of tackling such a project within a large organization, and present lessons learned for others attempting similar endeavors.

  • Thumbnail for Label-less library logistics : implementing labor-saving practices in  Massachusetts’ high-volume resource sharing system
    Label-less library logistics : implementing labor-saving practices in Massachusetts’ high-volume resource sharing system by Utt, Catherine , Pronevitz, Greg , Ayre, Lori

    This paper presents important aspects and issues related to the merging of six regional library delivery services in a single statewide system that serves more than 550 libraries, that together circulate more than 15 million items annually throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The purpose of marrying the six distinct systems was to reduce redundancies and incorporate innovative features to improve library processing efficiency. Most libraries are members of one of nine separate shared integrated library systems. The paper covers the background, objectives, benefits, issues, lessons learned, and a successful request for proposal procurement process for this complex project.

  • Thumbnail for Team-based ingenuity supporting 21st century learners
    Team-based ingenuity supporting 21st century learners by Hutton, Sarah , Will, Carol , Davis, Robert C.

    Supporting the active learning process of the 21st century student is one of the main goals of the Learning Commons at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Building and maintaining effective student learning spaces and academic services requires proactive assessment of University climate, pedagogical direction, and curriculum development. Increasingly instructors are using active, group, and participatory teaching methods and are offering students opportunities to opt in to more creative assignments requiring the use of advanced technologies in support of multimedia projects. The UMass Libraries aim to anticipate the needs of instructors and students by tailoring student spaces to support teaching and learning goals. Collaboration with campus partners is essential in providing a holistic approach to meeting student need; the Office of Information Technologies (OIT) is one of the strongest partners in this collaboration, helping to form the teams that work to research, implement, and assess new academic projects.

  • Thumbnail for The evolution of e-books and interlibrary loan in academic libraries
    The evolution of e-books and interlibrary loan in academic libraries by Wicht, Heather

    As academic libraries add electronic monographs (e-books) to their collections in increasing numbers, they are frequently losing the ability to lend this portion of their collections via Interlibrary Loan (ILL) due to licensing restrictions. Recently, new options have emerged as alternatives to traditional ILL for e-books. These options introduce new opportunities for collaboration across library departments and with-in consortia. This article discusses the changing nature of resource sharing as related to e-books, examines e-book lending capabilities as they currently exist, and presents alternative models to traditional ILL, including short-term lending, purchase on demand and print on demand.

  • Thumbnail for Knowledge sharing through MS SharePoint
    Knowledge sharing through MS SharePoint by Weldon, Lorette S. J.

    Microsoft SharePoint is being used in government, private, public and association offices throughout the United States. SharePoint was created to increase accountability for projects within a team environment. How could SharePoint help increase accountability in information management? This article will review SharePoint’s positive and negative characteristics in the hopes of helping information professionals understand what SharePoint really is in the information world and how it can be applied to libraries and other information management organizations.

  • Thumbnail for Guest editorial : partnerships and collaborations in tough times
    Guest editorial : partnerships and collaborations in tough times by Needham, George , Williams, Joan Frye

    Why would we want to think about library partnerships at times like this? When we have decreasing resources concurrent with increasing demand, when community expectations for greater efficiency and cooperation continue to grow, and when we are facing questions about the relevance of the library, it’s more important than ever to reach out to other organizations and individuals to align with the needs of our community.

  • Thumbnail for A nation-wide planning framework for large-scale collaboration on legacy print monograph collections
    A nation-wide planning framework for large-scale collaboration on legacy print monograph collections by Kieft, Robert Henry , Payne, Lizanne

    Libraries are working toward collaborative management and preservation of print journals, newspapers, legal materials, and government documents; they must also establish a similar concerted effort focused on print monographs. Monographs present complex challenges at a time when libraries want to ensure the preservation of the print record but have increasing incentives to divest of older, less used print materials and take advantage of the affordances of electronic text. With LYRASIS as lead organization, planning partners California Digital Library (CDL), Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), and Center for Research Libraries (CRL) were awarded a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to conduct a workshop titled “Developing a North-American Strategy to Preserve & Manage Print Collections of Monographs.” Workshop participants discussed the challenges and issues involved in collaborative monograph preservation and formulated an agenda of research and demonstration projects to test elements of a strategy.

  • Thumbnail for Review of The anywhere library : a primer for the mobile web
    Review of The anywhere library : a primer for the mobile web by Baker, Christine

    Christine Baker reviews, "The Anywhere Library: A Primer for the Mobile Web." The book co-authored by three public services librarians, Courtney Greene, Missy Roser, and Elizabeth Ruane, who experienced the process of creating a mobile site for their own library. The experience prompted them to write this book with the intent of providing a useful framework for other librarians who are considering entering the mobile web arena.

  • Thumbnail for A new way to manage uncataloged materials : a case study  from moving the University of Nevada, Reno’s federal  depository colle
    A new way to manage uncataloged materials : a case study from moving the University of Nevada, Reno’s federal depository colle by Beisler, Amalia , Ragains, Patrick

    In 2008, the University of Nevada, Reno Library moved into a new building, the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center. As part of this move, approximately half of the library’s print collections were moved into the building’s automated storage and retrieval system; a substantial portion of these materials were federal depository materials. This case study describes how cataloging and government documents staff at the University of Nevada, Reno collaborated to achieve intellectual and physical control over a huge, largely uncataloged government documents collection destined for automatic storage. More than 9,000 linear feet of uncataloged government documents had to be placed into an automated storage system that requires catalog records for all stored items. To accommodate uncataloged documents, staff devised a way to create bulk catalog records, store these materials efficiently, and provide user access. The authors will explain how this project was planned for and executed as part of the library move, and then assess the success of the project and its impact on public and technical services operations after a year of working with the new system. The impact of moving this collection on public access is particularly significant in light of the library’s service mandate as a regional federal depository.

  • Thumbnail for Nontraditional partnerships in pursuit of the  “information infrastructure”
    Nontraditional partnerships in pursuit of the “information infrastructure” by Kramer, Jason

    The New York State Higher Education Initiative (NYSHEI) represents the public and private academic and research libraries of New York, and differs from other state-based academic library organizations in both its size and mission. NYSHEI holds about 150 member institutions, including all 87 of the state’s public colleges and universities, and nine ARL members. Founded in 2002, NYSHEI evolved into its current form in 2007 by adopting a focus on political advocacy. NYSHEI applies its diverse collection of collaborating libraries toward achieving a statewide “information infrastructure” that supports not just the academic enterprise, but all research, innovation, and entrepreneurialism in New York. An important lesson learned during the formative phase of NYSHEI is that collaboration as a strategic value can be fairly meaningless. Rightly understood, collaboration is a tactic that helps two or more parties attain separate but shared aims. As such, NYSHEI approaches information resources as a required utility for the modern era, and actively works with partners in the business community, state government, and health care fields to promote widespread access to information resources.

  • Thumbnail for Libraries and sustainability in developing countries : leadership models based on three successful organizations
    Libraries and sustainability in developing countries : leadership models based on three successful organizations by Michael, Athena

    The purpose of this study is to examine leadership styles highly effective in building sustainable libraries in developing countries. The author studies the leadership of three organizations: Room to Read, Central Asia Institute (CAI), and the Hester J. Hodgdon (HJH) Libraries for All Program, each focusing to some extent on libraries and literacy in developing countries. Following a review of the history of sustainability in the library community, aspects of Andy Hargreaves’ and Dean Fink’s principles of sustainable leadership are referenced in an analysis of the leadership styles found in these organizations. The author concludes that, although Room to Read, CAI, and HJH Libraries for All Program were not founded by librarians, their successful modes of leadership represent collaborative initiatives that help build sustainable communities and offer models of leadership for the profession of librarianship.