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  • Thumbnail for Discoverability challenges and collaboration opportunities within the scholarly communications ecosystem : a SAGE white paper up
    Discoverability challenges and collaboration opportunities within the scholarly communications ecosystem : a SAGE white paper up by Conrad, Lettie Y. , Somerville, Mary M.

    The prominence of mainstream search engines and the rise of web-scale, pre-indexed discovery services present new challenges and opportunities for publishers, librarians, vendors, and researchers. With the aim of furthering collaborative conversations, SAGE commissioned a study of opportunities for improving academic discoverability with value chain experts in the scholarly communications ecosystem. Results were released in January 2012 as a white paper titled Improving Discoverability of Scholarly Content in the Twentieth Century: Collaboration Opportunities for Librarians, Publishers, and Vendors. Following the white paper, this article explores the implications for these findings through review of commissioned studies, research reports, journal articles, conference papers, and white papers published in the ensuing twelve months. Sidebars highlight especially promising cross-sector initiatives for enhancing researcher discoverability of the scholarly corpus at appropriate points in their workflow, including the NISO Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) and the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID). Concluding reflections highlight opportunities for librarians to contribute to cross-sector collaborations that sup-port discovery of quality peer-reviewed content by improving navigation, discoverability, visibility, and usage of the scholarly corpus.

  • Thumbnail for Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice
    Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice by Ladwig, J. Parker , Belzowski, Nora F. , Miller, Thurston

    Faculty/librarian collaboration is vital for librarians to remain integral to the academy. We now have an opportunity to change how we perceive ourselves and how we are perceived by faculty and administrators. There are viable solutions for expanding the role of the librarian in ways that could lead to better faculty partnerships. First, librarians must be grounded in a shared purpose and professional identity and establish a contextual framework for our own professional ‘boundaries.’ We cannot create an intersection with the knowledge and experience of others if we do not have an understanding of our own frame. Interviews and investigation of the professional literature led to a re-discovery of communities of practice. Communities of practice (CoPs) are promising tools for librarians because they can be used to develop and sustain professional identity. Once the shared purpose and practice is identified, CoPs can facilitate collaboration between librarians and faculty and develop partnerships that will increase understanding, create meaningful connections and improve perception. Communities of practice build professional empathy, and this empathetic understanding is the essence of alignment. Once our services are aligned with the needs and expectations of our users, we will become more relevant and valuable to our institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Embracing INTO : library plans and campus collaboration to  serve an increased international student population
    Embracing INTO : library plans and campus collaboration to serve an increased international student population by Farrell, Shannon L. , Bullington, Jeffrey S. , Cranston, Catherine L.

    Universities are using private recruitment agencies to fast-track internationalization initiatives and realize tuition-based revenue increases. Colorado State University (CSU), with this dual aim of increasing the proportion of international students on campus and generating income via out-of-state tuition, signed a contract with INTO, a British organization that works to recruit international students to attend partner institutions from countries across five continents. International students, although not a homogenous population, as a whole do bring unique challenges. Our study examined how both campus and the library could prepare for the expected large influx of international students. Seeking to understand the INTO model and the effect it would have on campus, particularly in terms of resource planning, we conducted a series of interviews with INTO staff, librarians at other U.S. INTO institutions, and CSU faculty and staff who would interact most substantially with the INTO population. Various campus departments have made significant preparations to prepare for the growing INTO population, and we identified several steps that the CSU Libraries could take to better serve these students, including enhancing existing services and fostering new campus collaborations.

  • Thumbnail for Crossing borders : two academic librarians and a young adult librarian collaborate to teach teens about sustainability
    Crossing borders : two academic librarians and a young adult librarian collaborate to teach teens about sustainability by Aulisio, George J. , McHugh, Sheli

    Two academic librarians from The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Memorial Library partnered with a young adult librarian from the Scranton Public Library to help plan, organize, and implement, a sustainability themed summer series of events for a teen group. This paper discusses experiences of collaborating across traditional library boundaries from perspectives of a technical services librarian, an academic reference librarian, and a young adult librarian united to work together and educate teens about going green. Various resources and literature helped build a successful summer series on sustainability and demonstrated the important role librarians can play in promoting related environmental issues. The project also formed a meaningful bond between a public librarian and two academic librarians.

  • Thumbnail for LCF : collaborating internationally to leap forward
    LCF : collaborating internationally to leap forward by Ayre, Lori

    In this article, Lori Ayre's discusses Library Communication Framework (LCF). LCF is a set of protocols that replicate and extend Standard Interchange Protocol (SIP2) and NCIP2 while adding web services functionality for the exchange of information.

  • Thumbnail for Betwixt and between collaborative online spaces : editing and publishing a collection of essays
    Betwixt and between collaborative online spaces : editing and publishing a collection of essays by Tolley-Stokes, Rebecca, 1971-

    Rebecca Tolley-Stokes reviews several online tools that allowed her and her co-editors, who were separated by distance, to collaborate on their project and bring it to fruition.

  • Thumbnail for A tribute to Alan Charnes
    A tribute to Alan Charnes by Machovec, George

    Friends and colleagues offer words of tribute and good wishes on the August 2011 retirement of Alan Charnes, Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration in eTextbook publishing : a case study
    Collaboration in eTextbook publishing : a case study by Weber, Alice , Morrow, Anne , Wimmer, Erin N.

    The need for a tailored textbook for a distance class of PhD nursing students led to a collaboration between a College of Nursing faculty member and librarians from academic and health sciences libraries. The partnership incorporated new and existing library services in the “Research with Diverse Populations” class. Librarians provided curriculum support services and facilitated the creation of an eTextbook authored by class members. The Research with Diverse Populations eTextbook was designed to be openly accessible and structured to expand as future students make additional contributions. The audience for the eBook extends beyond the course participants to a broader audience of clinicians and researchers working with vulnerable populations. The eBook collaboration is an innovative and unique approach to addressing the needs of a faculty member. It is anticipated that the collaborative process will inspire similar projects in the future.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication
    Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication by Calkins, Kaijsa

    Kaijsa Calkins reviews, "Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication" edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley. This book brings together an excellent collection of writing by librarians, disciplinary faculty, and others from a wide variety of higher education settings that address the intersections between scholarly communication and information literacy instruction initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration in Australian library consortia
    Collaboration in Australian library consortia by Wade, Rona , Horton, Valerie

    Ms. Rona Wade, CEO of UNILINC based in Sydney, Australia, was appointed to the Advisory Board of Collaborative Librarianship. UNILINC, a robust consortium serving 22 libraries of several types across Australia, offers a number of services including cataloging, electronic content loading and presentation, interlibrary loan and document delivery, training and shared online catalogs. Its most recent initiatives focus on next generation integrated library systems. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Finding library solutions in adjacent industries
    Finding library solutions in adjacent industries by Ayre, Lori

    As much as we like to think that libraries are unique, they actually operate much like a supply chain system with central distribution centers and retail outlets. Obviously, there are differences but when it comes to materials handling, an area in which I do a lot of consulting, the similarities are striking. Both industries distribute material to outlets, require complex logistics systems, require accurate sorting and picking, and employ self-service technologies. As such, I spend a lot of time learning about warehouse management, logistics, supply chain technologies and best practices, and I use that knowledge in my consulting. Supply chain and warehouse management systems occupy adjacent niches to library materials handling. Not exactly the same industry but lots in common.

  • Thumbnail for Using technology to increase community engagement
    Using technology to increase community engagement by Ayre, Lori

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses important aspects about community collaboration and the use of technology. As Program Co-Chair for the California Library Association’s Annual Conference, she reviews all the proposed sessions and, as a result, she get to see not only what California libraries are doing but also the initiatives of which they are most proud. And what libraries seem to be most proud of these days is work they are doing in partnership with other groups in their community. Community collaborations and partnerships are inside our libraries, in our communities, and on our library websites. Many of these collaborations rely on technology in one way or another.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Studying  students : a second look
    Review of Studying students : a second look by Couture, Juliann

    This book, Studying Students: A Second Look, edited by Nancy Fried Foster is a follow-up to a 2007 publication, Studying Students: The Undergraduate Research Project at the University of Rochester that demonstrates once again the benefits of conducting ethnographic studies when designing academic library spaces and services.

  • Thumbnail for RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy
    RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy by Ayre, Lori Bowen

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses technology and convenience versus privacy.

  • Thumbnail for Whose job is it anyway?
  • Thumbnail for Label-less library logistics : implementing labor-saving practices in  Massachusetts’ high-volume resource sharing system
    Label-less library logistics : implementing labor-saving practices in Massachusetts’ high-volume resource sharing system by Pronevitz, Greg , Utt, Catherine , Ayre, Lori

    This paper presents important aspects and issues related to the merging of six regional library delivery services in a single statewide system that serves more than 550 libraries, that together circulate more than 15 million items annually throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The purpose of marrying the six distinct systems was to reduce redundancies and incorporate innovative features to improve library processing efficiency. Most libraries are members of one of nine separate shared integrated library systems. The paper covers the background, objectives, benefits, issues, lessons learned, and a successful request for proposal procurement process for this complex project.

  • Thumbnail for Yo soy Colorado : three collaborative Hispanic cultural heritage initiatives
    Yo soy Colorado : three collaborative Hispanic cultural heritage initiatives by Montoya, Fawn-Amber , EchoHawk, Dana , Gonzales, Rhonda , Somerville, Mary M. , Allen, Beverly

    Collaborative activities that reflect ‘ethnicity as provenance’ benefit from collaborative, interdependent relationships among archives, classroom, and community. Examples from Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library (University of Colorado Denver) and the Southern Colorado Ethnic Heritage and Diversity Archives and the Voices of Protest Oral History Project (Colorado State University-Pueblo) illustrate collection development practices that advance joint ownership of archival materials by the archives and the originating cultural population. Concluding reflections offer transferable principles for working collaboratively with cultural communities on creation, identification, interpretation, and preservation of photographs, videos, documents, oral histories and ephemeral material reflective of culture, achievements, conflict, and legacy.

  • Thumbnail for Again a cottage industry
    Again a cottage industry by Gaetz, Ivan

    If Gaetz interprets correctly the views of Jason Epstein, elder statesman of the publishing world, Collaborative Librarianship in fact takes its place in the rebirthing of a cottage industry. The Random House College Dictionary defines “cottage industry” as, “an industry in which the product is made in a self-employed worker’s home (in contrast with a factory).” Beginning in the 1450's in homes and shops, printing and publishing progressed through the centuries to become enormous, multinational corporate empires. Now, all that is changing. With the emergence of the internet, social networking and mobile technologies of one kind or another, a new paradigm comes into play, a new model described by Epstein as a cottage industry long forgotten in the big business of publishing—and you are invited to be a part of it! Collaborative Librarianship invites you to become directly involved in this new cottage industry as authors, editors, reviewers, readers, responders—working where you are, anywhere in the world, creatively, autonomously, and exhibiting much diversity—interacting with information and knowledge. You have an opportunity to participate in meaningful ways in this new world of publishing anticipated by Jason Epstein.

  • Thumbnail for Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria
    Librarians and health workers : partnering and collaborating to support free access to health information in Nigeria by Ukachi, Ngozi B.

    Well-being of individuals and communities depend on accessibility to accurate health information. A recent study shows that many communities in regions of Nigeria lack accessibility to this information. Building on the success of partnerships between librarians and health care workers in the delivery of health information in other parts of the world, the Nigerian situation could be greatly improved through a number of strategies, as suggested in this article.

  • Thumbnail for JISC collections : post-cancellation entitlement registry scoping project
    JISC collections : post-cancellation entitlement registry scoping project by Bascones, Magaly

    Since e-journals were first introduced into library collections, Post-Cancellation Access (PCA) rights and perpetual access have been a concern for librarians. Perpetual access concerns are being addressed by initiatives such as LOCKSS, CLOCKSS, PORTICO, among others. The same cannot be said for PCA rights. We haven’t yet seen any commercial, institutional or community initiative and work directed at addressing the problem. It is within this context that the JISC Collections: Post-Cancellation Entitlement Registry Scoping Project has been designed and implemented. It has explored in some detail what would happen if an institution wanted to ascertain from a publisher what its PCA rights were. The findings of interest to publishers and libraries are detailed in this article.

  • Thumbnail for Library collaboration – exploring new business models : an interview with Marvin Pollard
    Library collaboration – exploring new business models : an interview with Marvin Pollard by Pollard, Marvin , Tucker, Cory, 1970-

    In the past few years, academic libraries have faced many significant challenges. Due to the financial crisis, the cuts to library collections have caused an evolution in the philosophy of collecting, accessing, and delivering information. Financial constraints have resulted considerations of a “just-in-time” collection philosophy, where libraries have explored new models of collecting information and delivering content to their patrons. Collaborative Librarianship caught up with Marvin Pollard to discuss this issue.

  • Thumbnail for  Collaborative Librarianship : five years and counting
    Collaborative Librarianship : five years and counting by Gaetz, Ivan

    Ivan Gaetz, co-editor of Collaborative Librarianship, reflects as the journal completes five full years of publishing. Not only does the journal publish articles on collaboration, it also represents in practical terms some of the best practices in library collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Collaborative leadership
    Collaborative leadership by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses collaborative leadership.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Collaborative library research projects : inquiry that stimulates the senses
    Review of Collaborative library research projects : inquiry that stimulates the senses by Eckhardt, Su A.

    Su Eckhard reviews John D. Volkman's book, "Collaborative Library Research Projects: Inquiry that Stimulates the Senses." Whether you are a fledgling or experienced teacher-librarian (school library media specialist) with or without teaching experience, this book might be helpful for you. Volkman has included everything you want to know and use to jump-start your school library program.

  • Thumbnail for Review of the Campus collaborative tools strategy at UC Berkeley
    Review of the Campus collaborative tools strategy at UC Berkeley by Filar-Williams, Beth

    Beth Filar-Williams reviews the program Campus Collaborative Tools Strategy at UC Berkeley. Collaboration tools are becoming popular across campuses. Many institutions are struggling with how to provide support for the multitude of diverse, ever-changing, often open source programs that are frequently used “to fly under the radar”of campus IT protocols. The University of California Berkeley Information Services and Technology (IST) division began to address this issue a few years ago. UC Berkeley recognized the need to create and to support an easy, convenient environment for people on and off campus in which to collaborate on scholarship, teaching, learning, and administrative services.