DigitalCC


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  • Thumbnail for The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi
    The library as an academic partner in student retention and graduation : the library’s collaboration with the freshman year semi by Sanabria, Jesus E.

    In order for academic libraries to continue to demonstrate their value in an age of accountability, developing strong collaborations is essential. Collaborations provide a first rate opportunity for librarians not only to demonstrate their value to the institution and the research practices of the faculty but to facilitate teaching students how to navigate an increasingly diverse and at times confusing information environment driven by access to several technologies. For students entering college, learning early how to navigate the library and its resources can become an important element to their academic success. Inclusion of the library faculty into the development and teaching modules of student orientations and first year seminars, such as the ones designed at the Bronx Community College of the City of New York, provide a great step in establishing our value in promoting retention and graduation.

  • Thumbnail for Re-conceiving entrepreneurship for libraries : collaboration and the anatomy of a conference
    Re-conceiving entrepreneurship for libraries : collaboration and the anatomy of a conference by Scanlon, Mary G., 1955- , Crumpton, Michael A.

    For librarians who have worked in the field and have become innovative out of necessity, developing and creating entrepreneurial activities are not unusual. Perhaps recognizing and celebrating those achievements could change common perspectives on the entrepreneurial abilities of librarians. This idea launched the collaborative efforts of two universities to demonstrate this to be so. The libraries at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, successfully collaborated on the planning and execution of a conference to celebrate entrepreneurism within the field of librarianship. In doing so, each organization was able to promote its unique talents and give signature to the notion that librarians can be, and in fact are, entrepreneurial. The collaborative value found in this project was derived from our sense of fulfillment of our social responsibility and of celebrating entrepreneurship within the profession. This conference serves as an example of embedded collaboration versus simple logistics, and the conference planning team now looks forward to future endeavors.

  • Thumbnail for Whither library consortia?
    Whither library consortia? by Horton, Valerie

    Since the 2008 recession, library consortia have been struggling. Research for an upcoming book found that 21% of consortia surveyed in a large 2007 American Library Association survey had closed or merged. Of particular note, was the well-known merger of SOLINET, PALINET, NELINET, and BCR into LYRASIS. Regional library systems were particularly hard hit by the loss of state funding, with some systems closings in California and Texas. Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Illinois combined regional library systems into small organizations. Clearly, a lot has been happening in library consortia in the past few years as borne out in several recent surveys on library consortia in America.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Pay it forward : mentoring new information professionals
    Review of Pay it forward : mentoring new information professionals by Krismann, Carol

    Carol Krissman reviews, "Pay it Forward: Mentoring New Information Professionals." This booklet is the fourth installment in ACRL’s Active Guide Series. Written by two information professionals, Mary Ann Mavrinac, and Kim Stymest who are in a mentoring relationship, the goal is to explore each point of view and cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of mentoring.

  • Thumbnail for “Mendeley” : a review
    “Mendeley” : a review by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews the website Mendeley. Mendeley (http://www.mendeley.com/) is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help organize research, collaborate online, and discover the latest research.

  • Thumbnail for RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy
    RFID, GPS, and 3G : radio wave technologies and privacy by Ayre, Lori Bowen

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses technology and convenience versus privacy.

  • Thumbnail for Whose job is it anyway?
  • Thumbnail for Just the two of us : those who co-teach, co-learn
    Just the two of us : those who co-teach, co-learn by Matlin, Talitha R. , Carr, Allison

    Teaching librarians are always seeking opportunities to improve their professional practice. Traditional forms of professional and personal development—attending workshops and conferences and reading the scholarly and practitioner literature—are valuable and useful, but often ignore the powerful personal connections we have between colleagues. Using a narrative approach, this article will provide two teacher librarians’ stories about their experiences with team teaching as a method of professional development. Turning the traditional mentorship model on its head, each librarian contributed equally to the relationship and took the risk of being vulnerable in order to learn from one another. A newer librarian, looking to expand her teaching toolkit, become acculturated to her new institution, and develop her teacher identity, taught alongside an experienced librarian looking for new teaching techniques, a way to prevent “burnout,” and a more intentional and reflective approach to teaching. In addition, the authors will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the benefits of team teaching and will provide recommendations for others through an account of how they planned, managed the classroom, and assessed student work.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration in eTextbook publishing : a case study
    Collaboration in eTextbook publishing : a case study by Weber, Alice , Wimmer, Erin N. , Morrow, Anne

    The need for a tailored textbook for a distance class of PhD nursing students led to a collaboration between a College of Nursing faculty member and librarians from academic and health sciences libraries. The partnership incorporated new and existing library services in the “Research with Diverse Populations” class. Librarians provided curriculum support services and facilitated the creation of an eTextbook authored by class members. The Research with Diverse Populations eTextbook was designed to be openly accessible and structured to expand as future students make additional contributions. The audience for the eBook extends beyond the course participants to a broader audience of clinicians and researchers working with vulnerable populations. The eBook collaboration is an innovative and unique approach to addressing the needs of a faculty member. It is anticipated that the collaborative process will inspire similar projects in the future.

  • Thumbnail for Scholar-librarian collaboration in the publication of scholarly materials
    Scholar-librarian collaboration in the publication of scholarly materials by Harkema, Craig , Nelson, Brent, 1966-

    Recent developments in scholarly publication and the new directions being pursued in both humanities departments and libraries in the production of digital content provide opportunity for scholars and libraries to explore new models for working together to produce and disseminate scholarly materials. We offer as a first step toward a model for publication the case of Opuscula: Short Texts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (OSTMAR), a hybrid form of publication that leverages the university library infrastructure to create a platform for the publication of scholarly primary materials, an area of publication formerly reserved for the commercial press. This model is dependent on close collaboration between scholar and librarian, the nuances of which are outlined in this paper.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication
    Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication by Calkins, Kaijsa

    Kaijsa Calkins reviews, "Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication" edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley. This book brings together an excellent collection of writing by librarians, disciplinary faculty, and others from a wide variety of higher education settings that address the intersections between scholarly communication and information literacy instruction initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Digital humanities in practice
    Review of Digital humanities in practice by Honn, Josh

    Josh Honn reviews, "Digital Humanities in Practice" edited by Claire Warwick, Melissa Terras and Julianne Nyhan. The editors present a volume of reflections on the digital humanities work that is underway at University College London Centre for Digital Humanities (UCLDH).

  • Thumbnail for The library in 2020
    The library in 2020 by Hurst-Wahl, Janet

    A thought piece on the library envisioned for 2020 sparks reflection and conversation on how library schools, librarians and library organizations might prepare for this possible coming reality. Broader considerations are needed regarding collaboration, community, crossroads, service and flexibility.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Supporting the changing research practices of chemists : Research Support Services : Chemistry Project
    Review of Supporting the changing research practices of chemists : Research Support Services : Chemistry Project by Dupuis, John

    John Dupuis reviews the document, "Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Chemists" by Matthew P. Long and Roger C. Schonfeld.

  • Thumbnail for How super-consortia saved our libraries from the forces of evil…and themselves
  • Thumbnail for Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events
    Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events by Wirth, Andrea A.

    Oregon State University (OSU) Libraries participated in Open Access (OA) Week in 2009 and 2010. In order to expand the range of events offered, the committee members assigned to program planning looked for opportunities to work with partners beyond the library. The collaborative activities developed through these partnerships created settings for in-depth conversations among librarians, faculty, and students about scholarly communication issues. Subject librarians’ relationships with their departments provided opportunities to host events in venues other than the library, which helped, facilitate access to a diverse audience. An established cooperative relationship with the University of Oregon made it possible to provide additional presentations to the OSU community. An evaluation of the quantity and quality of contacts made during OA Week suggests the collaborative activities enriched these outreach activities and that participation in OA Week is worthwhile for OSU Libraries to continue.

  • Thumbnail for A collaborative schema for electronic resource description
    A collaborative schema for electronic resource description by Harkema, Craig , Tharani, Karim , Sorensen, Charlene

    Academic libraries are attempting to manage growing collections of diverse electronic resources in a chaotic environment of evolving standards and systems. The transition from a print-dominated resource environment to an electronic one has complicated the decision-making process. Current discourse primarily focuses on meeting patron needs and has distracted researchers from looking at librarian needs. The authors discovered that librarians want a better understanding of the nature, extent, and diversity of electronic resources for decision making, assessment, and accountability. Drawing from the collaborative methods and design philosophies of other disciplines, this paper outlines an approach to leveraging Web 2.0 philosophy and Business Intelligence techniques to address these needs. This approach will serve as a guide for academic librarians to transcend their current practices in order to develop innovative, collaborative, and holistic approaches to the joint stewardship of library electronic resource collections.

  • Thumbnail for Label-less library logistics : implementing labor-saving practices in  Massachusetts’ high-volume resource sharing system
    Label-less library logistics : implementing labor-saving practices in Massachusetts’ high-volume resource sharing system by Pronevitz, Greg , Ayre, Lori , Utt, Catherine

    This paper presents important aspects and issues related to the merging of six regional library delivery services in a single statewide system that serves more than 550 libraries, that together circulate more than 15 million items annually throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The purpose of marrying the six distinct systems was to reduce redundancies and incorporate innovative features to improve library processing efficiency. Most libraries are members of one of nine separate shared integrated library systems. The paper covers the background, objectives, benefits, issues, lessons learned, and a successful request for proposal procurement process for this complex project.

  • Thumbnail for The evolution of e-books and interlibrary loan in academic libraries
    The evolution of e-books and interlibrary loan in academic libraries by Wicht, Heather

    As academic libraries add electronic monographs (e-books) to their collections in increasing numbers, they are frequently losing the ability to lend this portion of their collections via Interlibrary Loan (ILL) due to licensing restrictions. Recently, new options have emerged as alternatives to traditional ILL for e-books. These options introduce new opportunities for collaboration across library departments and with-in consortia. This article discusses the changing nature of resource sharing as related to e-books, examines e-book lending capabilities as they currently exist, and presents alternative models to traditional ILL, including short-term lending, purchase on demand and print on demand.

  • Thumbnail for Making lemonade : the potential of increased peer metadata training among cultural heritage professionals
    Making lemonade : the potential of increased peer metadata training among cultural heritage professionals by Schneider, Ingrid

    This paper explores training in metadata creation for digital collections among cultural heritage communities in the context of a challenging economic and professional development climate. It is the author’s experience that many cultural heritage professionals from smaller institutions have not had the resources to obtain training in the standards and best practices necessary for building and maintaining digital collections that are robust and interoperable outside of their local context. This paper draws on theory and personal experience to propose that larger institutions should assist their smaller counterparts through localized peer training programs, and that the benefits drawn from these programs may position cultural heritage institutions to better innovate and adapt to the ever-changing information landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Extending access to electronic resources of a merged community college and university library
    Extending access to electronic resources of a merged community college and university library by Dresselhaus, Angela

    Utah State University and the College of Eastern Utah merged in July 2010, necessitating the renegotiation of all electronic resource licenses. The author discusses the process of renegotiating licenses, providing access to electronic collections remotely, troubleshooting and other important areas regarding libraries and mergers in higher education. This paper will provide an Electronic Resource Merger Guide to assist future library mergers.

  • Thumbnail for The Golden ratio and community
    The Golden ratio and community by Ayre, Lori

    Lori Ayre reviews the book, "The Secret Code : The Mysterious Formula that Rules Art, Nature, and Science" by Priya Hemenway.

  • Thumbnail for Review of “Colwiz”
    Review of “Colwiz” by Hicks, Alison

    Alison Hicks reviews colwiz, a citation management tool.

  • Thumbnail for Michigan Evergreen : implementing a shared open source integrated library system
    Michigan Evergreen : implementing a shared open source integrated library system by Dykhuis, Randy

    In 2008, seven Michigan public libraries migrated to Evergreen, an open source integrated library system developed by the George Public Library Service. The Michigan Library Consortium and Grand Rapids Public Library provided the support, training, networking, and system administration for the system. This article examines the reasons for implementing an open source system and the challenges to running and sustaining it.

  • Thumbnail for Hegemony of the West and the librarian’s role in the struggle against HIV/AIDS in Africa
    Hegemony of the West and the librarian’s role in the struggle against HIV/AIDS in Africa by Decker, Emy Nelson

    Africa is in need of information about HIV/AIDS. Currently, librarian activists have a duty to organize, repackage, and circulate HIV/AIDS information. Unfortunately, this has led to an unintentional assertion of cultural hegemony, which operates invisibly to those who are part of the “dominant” or “dominating” culture. Unexamined assumptions of “superiority” have led to a bias that the West has the only correct method for codifying knowledge. The West cannot fairly evaluate the successes or failures of HIV/AIDS education in Africa if it only employs American ideas, categories, and sensibilities, which is detrimental to people and cultures lacking the materials needed to protect themselves. A better method is to offer information in a way that appeals to the recipients’ epistemological patterns.