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  • Thumbnail for Discoverability challenges and collaboration opportunities within the scholarly communications ecosystem : a SAGE white paper up
    Discoverability challenges and collaboration opportunities within the scholarly communications ecosystem : a SAGE white paper up by Conrad, Lettie Y. , Somerville, Mary M.

    The prominence of mainstream search engines and the rise of web-scale, pre-indexed discovery services present new challenges and opportunities for publishers, librarians, vendors, and researchers. With the aim of furthering collaborative conversations, SAGE commissioned a study of opportunities for improving academic discoverability with value chain experts in the scholarly communications ecosystem. Results were released in January 2012 as a white paper titled Improving Discoverability of Scholarly Content in the Twentieth Century: Collaboration Opportunities for Librarians, Publishers, and Vendors. Following the white paper, this article explores the implications for these findings through review of commissioned studies, research reports, journal articles, conference papers, and white papers published in the ensuing twelve months. Sidebars highlight especially promising cross-sector initiatives for enhancing researcher discoverability of the scholarly corpus at appropriate points in their workflow, including the NISO Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) and the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID). Concluding reflections highlight opportunities for librarians to contribute to cross-sector collaborations that sup-port discovery of quality peer-reviewed content by improving navigation, discoverability, visibility, and usage of the scholarly corpus.

  • Thumbnail for Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice
    Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice by Miller, Thurston , Ladwig, J. Parker , Belzowski, Nora F.

    Faculty/librarian collaboration is vital for librarians to remain integral to the academy. We now have an opportunity to change how we perceive ourselves and how we are perceived by faculty and administrators. There are viable solutions for expanding the role of the librarian in ways that could lead to better faculty partnerships. First, librarians must be grounded in a shared purpose and professional identity and establish a contextual framework for our own professional ‘boundaries.’ We cannot create an intersection with the knowledge and experience of others if we do not have an understanding of our own frame. Interviews and investigation of the professional literature led to a re-discovery of communities of practice. Communities of practice (CoPs) are promising tools for librarians because they can be used to develop and sustain professional identity. Once the shared purpose and practice is identified, CoPs can facilitate collaboration between librarians and faculty and develop partnerships that will increase understanding, create meaningful connections and improve perception. Communities of practice build professional empathy, and this empathetic understanding is the essence of alignment. Once our services are aligned with the needs and expectations of our users, we will become more relevant and valuable to our institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Alliances, partnerships and an Ethiopian journey : the story of  Mekelle’s children’s library
    Alliances, partnerships and an Ethiopian journey : the story of Mekelle’s children’s library by Lee, Janet

    Janet Lee, Technical Services Librarian and Associate Professor, Regis University, devoted her sabbatical leave for joining Yohannes Gebregeorgis, 2008 CNN Hero, and establishing the Segenat Children and Youth Library in Mekelle, Ethiopia. Lee discusses successes and challenges in setting up a library in a developing country.

  • Thumbnail for The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program
    The collaborative face of consortia : Collaborative Librarianship interviews Timothy Cherubini, Director for East Region Program by Cherubini, Timothy , Kraus, Joseph R.

    “Consortia are important players in the library collaborative process.” There is unlikely to be resistance to such a statement from most corners of our profession, yet what moves people (librarians and others) to positions with consortia—and what they do when they arrive there—remains a somewhat unexamined path. In this article, Collaborative Librarianship’s Joe Kraus discussed with Tim Cherubini, LYRASIS’ Director for East Region Programs, his personal experiences in positions with academic libraries as well as consortia and his movement between the two related but distinct environments. This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for The quest for sustainability in international library development : the experience of the Riecken Foundation
    The quest for sustainability in international library development : the experience of the Riecken Foundation by Cramer, Elizabeth , Boyd, John

    The Riecken Foundation provides support to communities in developing countries to create sustainable partnership library programs focusing on collection development, technology applications, and assembling professional staff and volunteers. This article studies the experience of the Foundation through research gathered in interviews with Bill Cartwright, President and CEO of the Foundation, along with on-site observations at six participating libraries, and offers analysis of documentation related to these sustainability initiatives. The study also examines the transition of the Foundation from a private foundation to a public charity and the effect this has had in its programming.

  • Thumbnail for  Staying current after graduation : a survey of social work alumni
    Staying current after graduation : a survey of social work alumni by Hacker, Linda

    How do our alumni stay current once they graduate and are away from academic information resources? Very few studies have addressed how alumni stay current in their field after graduation. This research surveyed the graduate and undergraduate Social Work alumni of The College at Brockport in asking key questions. Are you able to stay current with research, especially without access to article databases? Do you receive support from your employer to stay current? Does this include money/time off for participating in Continuing Education Programs (CEP), conferences or accessing article databases? This paper looks at the methods for, and importance of, staying current and analyzes results from a survey and makes recommendations for graduates, departments and librarians regardless of profession.

  • Thumbnail for LCF : collaborating internationally to leap forward
    LCF : collaborating internationally to leap forward by Ayre, Lori

    In this article, Lori Ayre's discusses Library Communication Framework (LCF). LCF is a set of protocols that replicate and extend Standard Interchange Protocol (SIP2) and NCIP2 while adding web services functionality for the exchange of information.

  • Thumbnail for Faculty in-service : how to boost academic library services
    Faculty in-service : how to boost academic library services by Lucas, Debra

    This article discusses a collaborative approach to educate college faculty about the library to encourage faculty to engage and participate in services such as library instruction, interlibrary loan, course reserves, and research desk assistance. The more faculty know about the library, the more that they use them. Well informed faculty create students who will also be interested in the library. In-servicing is recommended because it allows librarians to market the library. Creating a well-planned library in-service also creates an opportunity to highlight a librarian’s teaching and research skills.

  • Thumbnail for Collaboration is key : a public reference librarian’s  25-year retrospective
    Collaboration is key : a public reference librarian’s 25-year retrospective by Nemer, Ronna C.

    This article highlights various collaborative efforts during the author’s career as a reference librarian at a large metropolitan public library from 1986 to 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Going “all-in” for deep collaboration
    Going “all-in” for deep collaboration by Horton, Valerie

    Valerie Horton defines and discusses "deep collaboration." Deep collaboration is two or more people or organizations contributing substantial levels of personal or organizational commitment, including shared authority, joint responsibility, and robust resources allocation, to achieve a common or mutually-beneficial goal.

  • Thumbnail for  Collaboration in the community
    Collaboration in the community by Engard, Nicole C., 1979-

    On a regular basis, Nicole Engard contributes to Collaborative Librarianship. In this article, Nichole Engard discusses the value of collaborating in our communities.

  • Thumbnail for Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration
    Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration by Harcourt, Kate , LeBlanc, Jim

    The Columbia and Cornell University Libraries’ partnership is now in its fourth year. Its composite acronym (2CUL), which condenses a doubling of the two participating libraries’ initial letters, in itself reflects the very nature of the collaboration’s strategic purpose: a broad integration of library activities in a number of areas – including collection development, acquisitions and cataloging, e-resources and digital management, and digital preservation. In what is perhaps their boldest, most ambitious 2CUL initiative to date, the two libraries have begun planning for and have taken the first steps towards an integration of their substantial technical services operations. In this paper, the authors outline the goals of 2CUL Technical Services Integration (TSI), report on the first phase of the work, reflect on what they have learned so far in planning for this operational union, and look forward to the next steps of the project in which the two institutions will initiate incrementally the functional integration of the two divisions. The period covered in Phase 1 of TSI is September 2012-December 2013.

  • Thumbnail for Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school
    Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school by Juskiewicz, Scott , Cote, Conor

    Two librarians at a small STEM academic library have partnered with professors to develop and teach chemistry and writing courses. These librarians have successfully worked with professors to serve as an active presence within the classroom. This article describes the challenges of navigating the typical obstacles librarians face when attempting to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, reflects on the benefits of these collaborations, and touches on strategies for implementing similar programs at other institutions. It outlines two distinct approaches to collaborating with professors on credit-bearing information literacy courses, along with the key steps involved in planning and implementing these courses, including generating institutional buy-in, identifying potential collaborators, negotiating workload and responsibilities with collaborators, and planning to sustain courses beyond a single academic year. Suggestions for overcoming obstacles, supplemented by experience-based recommendations are discussed.

  • Thumbnail for Taking community to the world
    Taking community to the world by LaRue, James, 1954-

    Collaborative Librarianship is honored to have Jamie LaRue write the “Guest Editorial” for this issue. Jamie has appeared on NPR, been cited in the Wall Street Journal, Forbes and the Denver Post, was a newspaper columnist for over 20 years, and authored, The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges (Libraries Unlimited, 2007). From 1990 to 2014, he was director of the Douglas County (Colorado) Libraries, widely known as one of the most successful and innovative public libraries in the U.S.A. He has received numerous honors and recognitions for his contributions to libraries and communities spanning several decades. Today, Jamie LaRue writes, speaks and consults about the future of libraries. He is a candidate for the presidency of the American Library Association, the election to be held early in 2015.

  • Thumbnail for Finding library solutions in adjacent industries
    Finding library solutions in adjacent industries by Ayre, Lori

    As much as we like to think that libraries are unique, they actually operate much like a supply chain system with central distribution centers and retail outlets. Obviously, there are differences but when it comes to materials handling, an area in which I do a lot of consulting, the similarities are striking. Both industries distribute material to outlets, require complex logistics systems, require accurate sorting and picking, and employ self-service technologies. As such, I spend a lot of time learning about warehouse management, logistics, supply chain technologies and best practices, and I use that knowledge in my consulting. Supply chain and warehouse management systems occupy adjacent niches to library materials handling. Not exactly the same industry but lots in common.

  • Thumbnail for Enhancing collaboration through the Scholarship  of Teaching and Learning
    Enhancing collaboration through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning by Perini, Michael

    The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is a discipline that emphasizes instructional development and enhanced student learning through the dissemination of practitioner theory and experience. The discipline, however, primarily considers the role and perspectives of higher education and K-12 faculty. Yet SoTL also has pragmatic implications for librarians as it promotes instructional improvement, collaborative research, networking, and professional development across the academy.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Collaboration in libraries and learning environments
    Review of Collaboration in libraries and learning environments by Hedreen, Rebecca

    Rebecca Hedreen reviews, "Review of Collaboration in Libraries and Learning Environments" edited by Maxine Melling and Margaret Weaver. This book is not about librarians collaborating with faculty in online courseware, or even the merging of library and IT desks. This book is a collection of interesting and relevant case studies, many involving what are often called Learning or Information Commons. Not all of them involve libraries, and for many that do, the library is not the focus.

  • Thumbnail for Using technology to increase community engagement
    Using technology to increase community engagement by Ayre, Lori

    Lori Bowen Ayre discusses important aspects about community collaboration and the use of technology. As Program Co-Chair for the California Library Association’s Annual Conference, she reviews all the proposed sessions and, as a result, she get to see not only what California libraries are doing but also the initiatives of which they are most proud. And what libraries seem to be most proud of these days is work they are doing in partnership with other groups in their community. Community collaborations and partnerships are inside our libraries, in our communities, and on our library websites. Many of these collaborations rely on technology in one way or another.

  • Thumbnail for Review of Studying  students : a second look
    Review of Studying students : a second look by Couture, Juliann

    This book, Studying Students: A Second Look, edited by Nancy Fried Foster is a follow-up to a 2007 publication, Studying Students: The Undergraduate Research Project at the University of Rochester that demonstrates once again the benefits of conducting ethnographic studies when designing academic library spaces and services.

  • Thumbnail for Independent study equals instant collaboration
    Independent study equals instant collaboration by Peters, Alison

    This is the story of two LIS students, distance-challenged virtual strangers, who came together and found that success is a shared recipe, and collaboration is a gift that leads to greater things.

  • Thumbnail for Yo soy Colorado : three collaborative Hispanic cultural heritage initiatives
    Yo soy Colorado : three collaborative Hispanic cultural heritage initiatives by Allen, Beverly , Gonzales, Rhonda , Montoya, Fawn-Amber , EchoHawk, Dana , Somerville, Mary M.

    Collaborative activities that reflect ‘ethnicity as provenance’ benefit from collaborative, interdependent relationships among archives, classroom, and community. Examples from Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library (University of Colorado Denver) and the Southern Colorado Ethnic Heritage and Diversity Archives and the Voices of Protest Oral History Project (Colorado State University-Pueblo) illustrate collection development practices that advance joint ownership of archival materials by the archives and the originating cultural population. Concluding reflections offer transferable principles for working collaboratively with cultural communities on creation, identification, interpretation, and preservation of photographs, videos, documents, oral histories and ephemeral material reflective of culture, achievements, conflict, and legacy.

  • Thumbnail for Team-based ingenuity supporting 21st century learners
    Team-based ingenuity supporting 21st century learners by Will, Carol , Davis, Robert C. , Hutton, Sarah

    Supporting the active learning process of the 21st century student is one of the main goals of the Learning Commons at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Building and maintaining effective student learning spaces and academic services requires proactive assessment of University climate, pedagogical direction, and curriculum development. Increasingly instructors are using active, group, and participatory teaching methods and are offering students opportunities to opt in to more creative assignments requiring the use of advanced technologies in support of multimedia projects. The UMass Libraries aim to anticipate the needs of instructors and students by tailoring student spaces to support teaching and learning goals. Collaboration with campus partners is essential in providing a holistic approach to meeting student need; the Office of Information Technologies (OIT) is one of the strongest partners in this collaboration, helping to form the teams that work to research, implement, and assess new academic projects.

  • Thumbnail for By and for us : the development of a program for peer review of teaching by and for pre-tenure librarians
    By and for us : the development of a program for peer review of teaching by and for pre-tenure librarians by Miller, Willie , Lacy, Meagan , Trinoskey, Jessica , Alabi, Jaena , Weare, William H., Jr. , Snajdr, Eric , Huisman, Rhonda

    Seven pre-tenure librarians at the University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) created a peer review of teaching (PROT) group. This article provides an overview of the library literature on PROT and identifies the commonalities and variations found in PROT programs. The development, implementation, and benefits of the PROT program at IUPUI are discussed as well as out-comes pertaining to benefits for the observed, the observer, and for the PROT group as a whole. The authors also found that the implementation of a PROT program can enhance the sense of community among colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Marmot and Prospector : a statistical review
    Marmot and Prospector : a statistical review by Thomas, Jimmy

    Public and academic libraries of the Marmot Library Network in western Colorado joined the Prospector regional union catalog hosted by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries. Growth in patron-initiated resource sharing between Colorado Front Range/Wyoming and Western Slope libraries is analyzed in terms of circulation counts, lend/borrow ratios, load balancing issues, and collection development challenges.

  • Thumbnail for Expanding effective 21st century access to historical and academic materials : examples, strategies and implications
    Expanding effective 21st century access to historical and academic materials : examples, strategies and implications by Davis, Mitchell , Morris, Carolyn

    Given the capabilities for digitization that have emerged in recent years along with mobile access to the Internet, new library and business partnerships are now not only possible but also compelling in various ways. HTML5 web apps now make available library collections that historically have been closed or difficult to access. A partnership involving The British Library, Microsoft and BiblioLabs realizes some of these new potentials.