Colorado College Logo

454 hits

  • Thumbnail for Fox Woman
    Fox Woman by Gekko, Ogata (1859-1920)

    Ornately dressed woman gazing at her fox reflection in a stream. Metallic pigments, burnishing and blind printing. Color woodblock print;9 13/16†x 14 1/2†(25cm x 36.9cm).

  • Thumbnail for Sandalwood Smoke, Manchuria -- Fumees De Santal. Mandchoukuo
    Sandalwood Smoke, Manchuria -- Fumees De Santal. Mandchoukuo by Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960)

    Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Size: paper: 14.25" x 18.75"; image: 11.75" x 15.5". Image of Chinese woman leaning over a railing inhaling incense smoke. French, active in Japan,Jacoulet came to Japan from his native France with his parents when he was ten. He produced very fine Japanese-style prints and his work is widely appreciated by collectors and scholars of modern Japanese printmaking.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    Third set of images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Actor Ichikawa Komazo as a Samurai
    Actor Ichikawa Komazo as a Samurai by Katsukawa Shunko (1743-1812)

    image size: 11.75" x 5.25". Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Condition is very faded; framed behind glass. Vertical hosoban size. This print comes from a group of six prints of similar style and size, all acquired from T.Z. Shiota in San Francisco between 1961 and 1966. They all portray famous Kabuki actors in roles from Kabuki plays. This print is distinguished from the others because impressed on its surface is a round red seal reading "Hayashi Tada," which is the seal of one of the earliest Japanese Ukiyo-e print dealers to sell prints in Paris, Hayashi Tadamasa (1853-1906).

  • Thumbnail for Twilight in Imamiya street, Choshi, 1932
    Twilight in Imamiya street, Choshi, 1932 by Ishiwata, Koitsu (1897-1987)

    Evening street scene. Copyright publisher Watanabe Shozaburo. Color woodcut: imagesize 9 3/8 x 14 1/8".

  • Thumbnail for Nautch scene with three women
    Nautch scene with three women

    Punjabi school, made for export to the West; gouache on paper. 6.75†x 4.5â€

  • Thumbnail for Kaika Sanjuroku kaiseki (Thirty-six Modern Restaurants)
    Kaika Sanjuroku kaiseki (Thirty-six Modern Restaurants) by Kunichika Toyohara (1835-1900)

    Man & woman with umbrella strolling in foreground; Snowy river landscape with building (restaurant) behind. Wood cut print on paper; 13 3/8†x 9â€; sheet size 14 3/4†x 9 3/4â€.

  • Thumbnail for Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages)
    Jidai Kagami (Mirror of the Ages) by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    First two images of women from bound accordion-fold album of 30 woodblock prints with colophon. One half of full series of 50 prints depicting Japanese women of different historical periods highlighting their hairstyles and modes of dress.

  • Thumbnail for Drum ceremony with two actors
    Drum ceremony with two actors by Kogyo, Tsukioka

    Two actors with lacquer drum on stand and pine tree. Published by Matsuki Heikichi. Color woodblock print; 9†x 14â€.

  • Thumbnail for Keris from Java
    Keris from Java by Unknown

    Wood, carved ivory and metal, 18-1/2 (L) x 1-1/2 (W) x 2-1/8 (Depth) inches; blade and handle. A pair of symmetrical horses flank the lower back of the handle and above them are a pair of winged apsarases. Lotus and vegetative/floral garlands, along with parallel incisions, cover the rest of the surface.

  • Thumbnail for Cherry Blossom Battle
    Cherry Blossom Battle by Chikanobu, Toyohara (1837-1912)

    3 panel print depicting Meiji Empress and Ladies-in-Waiting watching Palace maidservants enact mock battle using branches of flowering cherry as weapons. Color woodblock print; 27†x 14â€.

  • Thumbnail for Kabuki fight scene with pyrotechnics
    Kabuki fight scene with pyrotechnics by Ginko Adachi (1874-1895)

    Actors ascending through stage trap door amid fireworks. Color woodblock print;9" x 14".

  • Thumbnail for Portrait of Prince Shōtoku (Shōtoku Taishi) with His Younger Brother and Son
    Portrait of Prince Shōtoku (Shōtoku Taishi) with His Younger Brother and Son by Anonymous

    Hanging scroll; ink, gold, and colors on silk. 70" x 26 1/2". Stored in paulownia wood (kiri) box. Prince Shōtoku (Shōtoku Taishi or Imperial Prince of Holy Virtue; 574-622) is regarded by later admirers as Japan's first great imperial statesman, the founding father of Buddhism in Japan, and the human incarnation of assorted Buddhist deities and distinguished monks. Belief in the interrelated nature of these accomplishments assured his leap to the status of mythic hero. This painting is a later version of a very famous, iconic portrait of Prince Shōtoku and his brother and son wearing Chinese-style court robes, dating to the late 7th or early 8th century and owned by the Imperial Household Agency. Paintings such as this and the cult with which they are associated came about in part because of the successful promotion of Prince Shōtoku by those with a vested interest in perpetuating the lineage of the imperial family by portraying its members as national heroes. Ironically, although power struggles within the imperial family shortly after Prince Shōtoku's death wrested authority away from his direct heirs, the usurpers could not undo the mythologizing of the Prince that elevated him to divine status.

  • Thumbnail for Six of the Thirty-six Immortal Poets - Henjo Yoshimine Munesada, one of the six
    Six of the Thirty-six Immortal Poets - Henjo Yoshimine Munesada, one of the six by Anonymous artist of the Tosa school

    Six framed pictures (once pages from an album with pictures of all 36 poets); ink and light colors on paper decorated with yaki-e (burned designs). Each 8 1/2" x 6". The artist of these paintings trained in the style of the Tosa school, an esteemed artistic lineage founded in the early Muromachi era (1392-1568) that painted both secular and religious-themed pictures for the emperor and other aristocratic families. These paintings though, were painted by an emulator of that lineage for affluent, well-educated merchant patrons who had, from the 18th century, had begun to appreciate Japan's ancient courtly artistic and literary heritage. Romantic and nostalgic poetry in Japanese was highly admired among ancient Japanese aristocrats. They particularly favored handwritten anthologies of poetry by thirty-six celebrated poets, who since the 11h century, had been designated as the “Immortal Poets,†and a special compilation of these poets’ works was produced. Compilations of their work came to include one poem by each Immortal Poet, a short biography, and, as in these pictures, an imaginary portrait.

  • Thumbnail for Plowing the Field
    Plowing the Field by Saito, Kyoshi [1907 - 1997]

    Color woodblock print of rice fields in front of village with farmer and bullock. 10 x 14 7/8 “.

  • Thumbnail for Two Geisha Dancing on a Stage
    Two Geisha Dancing on a Stage by Yashima Gakutei (1786-1868)

    Surimono-style woodblock print in ink, color, gold, and silver, with embossing on thick paper. 16" x 13" in good condition. An Ukiyo-e printmaker, Gakutei was a native of Edo, but lived and worked in Osaka in the 1830's. His work was much influenced by Hokusai. A Kyoka poet, Gakutei also put his own poems on his prints. Popular in his time, he was a good craftsman who made many excellent surimono and book illustrations. This print is a surimono (literally, "printed things"), a special type of Ukiyo-e woodblock print that combines poetry and printmaking in an often complex verbal-visual exchange. Produced largely during the second half of the Edo period, from the late 18th to the early 19th centuries, these privately published, limited-edition prints are extremely rare. Catering to the refined tastes of their literati patrons, surimono allowed higher standards of production. They were usually commissioned by groups of amateur poets to serve as New Year's greeting cards or as announcements of special events. Thus, the subjects most commonly represented were images of spring, especially scenes of New Year's activities, and auspicious symbols. The production of a surimono represented the collaboration of poets, artists, calligraphers, engravers, and publishers. Prints were generally initiated by a poet who would commission an artist to create a complementary motif or scene. The text and artist's design would then be taken to a private publisher who, working with a calligrapher and engraver, prepared the necessary blocks. The resulting prints were then distributed among the poet's friends and associates.

  • Thumbnail for Mughal (miniature painting) Portrait of a Seated Old Man with a White Beard
    Mughal (miniature painting) Portrait of a Seated Old Man with a White Beard by Unknown

    Paint on ivory, 3-1/2 (L) x 1-3/4 (W) inches. Framed, painted on ivory with gildng and polychrome. Mughal prince wearing gilt headdress and robes. Prince is seated with his left arm resting on the chair's arm while his hand is near his long necklaces hanging around his neck; in the background is a gold curtain hanging on his right side with a floral design of multi colors behind him with some white geometric shapes.

  • Thumbnail for Canton ware Plate with Palatial Design
    Canton ware Plate with Palatial Design

    Probably Canton export ware, 19th century Although the drawing of the design is casual and the glaze pitted, this plate is quite charming.

  • Thumbnail for Bowl with Interior Auspicious Design of Bats
    Bowl with Interior Auspicious Design of Bats

    Mark of the Qianlong reign (1736-1795), possibly 19th century. Porcelain with overglaze enamels. Diameter 5.5"

  • Thumbnail for Carved Door Lintel
    Carved Door Lintel

    Swat Region of Pakistan, cedar wood;16.5†x 37â€

  • Thumbnail for Intention
    Intention by Yoshida, Toshi (1911-1995)

    Woodblock print, 27.5 x 21.25 inches, by Toshi Yoshida. At the center of this abstract print is a fascinating large red shape, with black markings on it, placed against a brown moire background. It is totally ambiguous. Could it be a standing figure, like a primeval beast or raging humanoid, or is it more like an emblem or pendant? Or is it simply a visual representation of the mental state, intention? Along with realistic prints, Toshi made many abstract prints with shapes like this in various sizes and colors.

  • Thumbnail for Fragment
    Fragment by Izumi, Shigeru

    White squiggly lines on a grey rectangle, orange horizontal stripe, smaller color squiggles beneath it

  • Thumbnail for Damarupa - Thangka
    Damarupa - Thangka by Unknown

    Ground mineral pigment on cotton, silk brocade backing, 50-1/2 (L) x 30-1/2 (W). Damarupa wears a five -skull crown and holds a conch in his left hand and a drum in his right. Above him are Paden chogyo, Chok Lang, Marme Dzay, Chokyi Drakpa and Yonten O. In front are Yawa Huti, and an ascetic and the scholar Gaya Bhara. In the lower foreground are Mahakala, a monk and Lhamo. Painted in Central Tibetan style.

  • Thumbnail for Assassination Drawing
    Assassination Drawing by Unknown

    Ink and colored pencil on paper,18 (L) x 23 5/8 (W) inches. This sketch depicts the same event as 2004.2.1, however this is obviously by a different hand. This image is not nearly as well composed or as sophisticated in rendering as the previous example.

  • Thumbnail for Padmasambhava (Guru Rimpoche) (Thangka) - detail
    Padmasambhava (Guru Rimpoche) (Thangka) - detail by Unknown

    Ground mineral pigment on cotton, silk, 47-3/4 (L) x 29 (W) inches. Padmasambhava was the Indian Guru who brought Vajrayana Buddhism to Tibet in the 8th century, where he is credited with founding the Nyingmapa sect. He is shown surrounded by mahasiddhas (great yogic adepts) and manifestations of his various forms. Above, from right, are Vajrahana and consort, Vajrapani, Amitabha, two mahasiddhas, an unidentified figure, Mahakala and consort, Chenrezi, a Dakini, Lodan chrogsre, Nyama Oxer, and Shakyasengge. Flanking him ae his tow consorts, Mandarawa and Yeshetsogyal. Below are a protective deity, Guru Sengge, lion headed Dakini, Dorje Drolo, Rahu, Begtse, a guardian figure, Dorje Legspa on a snow lion, and a group of heavenly musicians on another snow lion in the lower right.