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  • Thumbnail for Leveraging strategic institutional partnerships : creating a phased learning commons at the University of Idaho Library
    Leveraging strategic institutional partnerships : creating a phased learning commons at the University of Idaho Library by Henrich, Kristin J.

    Following an energizing reorganization of the first floor, the University of Idaho Library sought additional strategies to support student learning and success. Building on previous successful collaborations with the Dean of Students Office, the Library and Tutoring Services created a model to offer peer-tutoring services in the library. Several philosophical and practical guidelines were considered, and implementation of the service, while challenging, was ultimately successful. Strategies for proposing, building, and maintaining similar partnerships with student services units are discussed, with best practices offered for other institutions seeking similar collaboration.

  • Thumbnail for Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of  assessment through the High Performance Programming model
    Library faculty and instructional assessment : creating a culture of assessment through the High Performance Programming model by Farkas, Meredith G., 1977- , Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke

    In an environment in which libraries increasingly need to demonstrate their value to faculty and administrators, providing evidence of the library’s contribution to student learning through its instruction program is critical. However, building a culture of assessment can be a challenge, even if librarians recognize its importance. In order to lead change, coordinators of library instruction at institutions where librarians are also tenure-track faculty must build trust and collaboration, lead through influence, and garner support from administration for assessment initiatives. The purpose of this paper is to explore what it takes to build a culture of assessment in academic libraries where librarians are faculty through the High Performance Programming model of organizational change. The guidelines for building a culture of assessment will be exemplified by case studies at the authors’ libraries where instruction coordinators are using collaboration to build a culture of assessment with their colleagues.

  • Thumbnail for Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development
    Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development by Shen, Lan

    Librarian-faculty relations are essential to library collection development. This paper discusses, first of all, the reasons for the customary disconnect between librarians and faculty in light of their different priorities, visions, expertise, and status. In an attempt to bridge the librarian-faculty separation, a horizontal strategy is proposed focusing on financial collaborations between the library and other academic departments on campus, such as adopting the balanced budget, fair and rotated resource allocation, and prioritized investment through providing a General Reserve Fund. A vertical strategy is also proposed defined as an organizational and professional partnership through three different vertical levels, namely, the university, unit (department/program), and individual levels. At the university level, while the collaboration needs to cover the areas of book selection, evaluation, preservation, weeding, and cancellation, it should also rely on campus-wide workshops as an effective way of improving collection development and professional training. At the unit level, in addition to the department liaison model, it is advisable to organize specific forums focusing on the special needs required by different academic programs and departments. Individual level collaboration is critical to achieving the proposed goals as all institutional strategies must rely on individual efforts. Librarians should provide individual, informal, and customized outreach services.

  • Thumbnail for Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events
    Incorporating existing library partnerships into Open Access Week events by Wirth, Andrea A.

    Oregon State University (OSU) Libraries participated in Open Access (OA) Week in 2009 and 2010. In order to expand the range of events offered, the committee members assigned to program planning looked for opportunities to work with partners beyond the library. The collaborative activities developed through these partnerships created settings for in-depth conversations among librarians, faculty, and students about scholarly communication issues. Subject librarians’ relationships with their departments provided opportunities to host events in venues other than the library, which helped, facilitate access to a diverse audience. An established cooperative relationship with the University of Oregon made it possible to provide additional presentations to the OSU community. An evaluation of the quantity and quality of contacts made during OA Week suggests the collaborative activities enriched these outreach activities and that participation in OA Week is worthwhile for OSU Libraries to continue.

  • Thumbnail for Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice
    Crafting identity, collaboration, and relevance for academic librarians using communities of practice by Miller, Thurston , Ladwig, J. Parker , Belzowski, Nora F.

    Faculty/librarian collaboration is vital for librarians to remain integral to the academy. We now have an opportunity to change how we perceive ourselves and how we are perceived by faculty and administrators. There are viable solutions for expanding the role of the librarian in ways that could lead to better faculty partnerships. First, librarians must be grounded in a shared purpose and professional identity and establish a contextual framework for our own professional ‘boundaries.’ We cannot create an intersection with the knowledge and experience of others if we do not have an understanding of our own frame. Interviews and investigation of the professional literature led to a re-discovery of communities of practice. Communities of practice (CoPs) are promising tools for librarians because they can be used to develop and sustain professional identity. Once the shared purpose and practice is identified, CoPs can facilitate collaboration between librarians and faculty and develop partnerships that will increase understanding, create meaningful connections and improve perception. Communities of practice build professional empathy, and this empathetic understanding is the essence of alignment. Once our services are aligned with the needs and expectations of our users, we will become more relevant and valuable to our institutions.

  • Thumbnail for Building a participatory culture : collaborating with student organizations for twenty-first century library instruction
    Building a participatory culture : collaborating with student organizations for twenty-first century library instruction by Ewing, Stacey R. , Clapp, Melissa J., 1977- , Johnson, Margeaux , Buhler, Amy

    Today’s students are critical thinkers, collaborators, and creators. They expect to participate in twenty-first century learning environments not as passive information consumers (think lectures), but as active contributors (think team-based problem-solving). There are opportunities for instruction librarians to collaborate directly with student-led organizations. These partnerships have the potential to increase attendance at library events and provide platforms for students to engage in richer forms of exploratory learning that incorporate twenty-first century skills. This article will discuss the literature surrounding library instruction collaborations, identify “Librarian–Student Organization Collaborations” as an important form of partnership, and supply specific case studies of successful library instruction events based on these collaborations.

  • Thumbnail for Scholar-librarian collaboration in the publication of scholarly materials
    Scholar-librarian collaboration in the publication of scholarly materials by Nelson, Brent, 1966- , Harkema, Craig

    Recent developments in scholarly publication and the new directions being pursued in both humanities departments and libraries in the production of digital content provide opportunity for scholars and libraries to explore new models for working together to produce and disseminate scholarly materials. We offer as a first step toward a model for publication the case of Opuscula: Short Texts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (OSTMAR), a hybrid form of publication that leverages the university library infrastructure to create a platform for the publication of scholarly primary materials, an area of publication formerly reserved for the commercial press. This model is dependent on close collaboration between scholar and librarian, the nuances of which are outlined in this paper.

  • Thumbnail for Partnering with public library services : a town and gown affair
    Partnering with public library services : a town and gown affair by Cisse, Sarah

    This article describes the collaborative effort between academic reference and Public Library Services (PLS) in developing and sustaining a resume resources program at a joint-use library. The resume resources workshops are a part of the summer workshop series, Adult Computer Camp, organized by the PLS department at the Alvin Sherman Library (ASL) of Nova Southeastern University (NSU). The summer workshop series offers an innovative variety of workshops to the public featuring online and computer resources. These workshops have been a successful collaboration between these two departments at the ASL, a joint-use or “town and gown” library.

  • Thumbnail for Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration
    Planning from the middle out : Phase 1 of 2CUL Technical Services Integration by Harcourt, Kate , LeBlanc, Jim

    The Columbia and Cornell University Libraries’ partnership is now in its fourth year. Its composite acronym (2CUL), which condenses a doubling of the two participating libraries’ initial letters, in itself reflects the very nature of the collaboration’s strategic purpose: a broad integration of library activities in a number of areas – including collection development, acquisitions and cataloging, e-resources and digital management, and digital preservation. In what is perhaps their boldest, most ambitious 2CUL initiative to date, the two libraries have begun planning for and have taken the first steps towards an integration of their substantial technical services operations. In this paper, the authors outline the goals of 2CUL Technical Services Integration (TSI), report on the first phase of the work, reflect on what they have learned so far in planning for this operational union, and look forward to the next steps of the project in which the two institutions will initiate incrementally the functional integration of the two divisions. The period covered in Phase 1 of TSI is September 2012-December 2013.