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  • Thumbnail for Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication
    Review of Common ground at the nexus of information literacy and scholarly communication by Calkins, Kaijsa

    Kaijsa Calkins reviews, "Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication" edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley. This book brings together an excellent collection of writing by librarians, disciplinary faculty, and others from a wide variety of higher education settings that address the intersections between scholarly communication and information literacy instruction initiatives.

  • Thumbnail for Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school
    Two approaches to collaborative information literacy instruction at a small engineering school by Juskiewicz, Scott , Cote, Conor

    Two librarians at a small STEM academic library have partnered with professors to develop and teach chemistry and writing courses. These librarians have successfully worked with professors to serve as an active presence within the classroom. This article describes the challenges of navigating the typical obstacles librarians face when attempting to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, reflects on the benefits of these collaborations, and touches on strategies for implementing similar programs at other institutions. It outlines two distinct approaches to collaborating with professors on credit-bearing information literacy courses, along with the key steps involved in planning and implementing these courses, including generating institutional buy-in, identifying potential collaborators, negotiating workload and responsibilities with collaborators, and planning to sustain courses beyond a single academic year. Suggestions for overcoming obstacles, supplemented by experience-based recommendations are discussed.

  • Thumbnail for Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives
    Sustainable collaborations : libraries link dual-credit programs to P-20 initiatives by Frank, Katherine , Bruch, Courtney

    This article argues for collaboration among academic libraries, academic departments, and high schools in order to strengthen articulation between the secondary and post-secondary sectors. It features work from a year-long project made possible by an LSTA grant and involving the Colorado State University-Pueblo Library, the English Composition Program, and several southern Colorado high schools that participate in the University’s dual-credit program titled “Senior-to-Sophomore.” This article outlines the process of using information literacy (IL) instruction to foster relationships among secondary and post-secondary instructors, improve communication between instructors and library staff within both sectors, and ultimately strengthen teaching and learning. Major challenges to an ongoing successful partnership include resources and program sustainability. The ultimate benefit, however, is the cross-institutional partnerships focused on IL instruction that benefit not only secondary to post-secondary articulation, but also the entire pre-school through graduate level (P-20) educational continuum.

  • Thumbnail for Learning from each other : a report on information literacy  programs at Orbis Cascade Alliance libraries
    Learning from each other : a report on information literacy programs at Orbis Cascade Alliance libraries by Diller, Karen R. , Senior, Heidi E. K. , Phelps, Sue F.

    Background: Over the last twenty-five years the focus of public services librarianship has migrated toward teaching. Often librarians are not aware of how neighboring institutions are managing that transition. The authors report the results from a survey of information literacy instruction and IL programs in libraries at institutions belonging to the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a consortium in the northwestern United States. Methods: After a literature review and round of testing, a survey link was sent to a contact person at each institution. Results: 38 survey responses were obtained from a range of academic libraries in size and scope. Twenty-seven respondents have had an information literacy program for more than five years; four respondents have had a formal information literacy program for fewer than three years. Seven respondents reported that they did not have an IL program. Conclusions: Librarians vary widely in the number of sessions they teach; one-shot sessions are still the most frequent mode of instruction; over half of Alliance libraries’ institutions have a written statement of objectives for information literacy; the use of active learning and technology is increasing; and librarians continue to struggle with student learning and instructional program assessment. (Survey appended)

  • Thumbnail for Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar
    Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course : the benefits of librar by Otto, Justin , Victor, Paul, Jr. , Mutschler, Chas. V., (Charles Vincent), 1955-

    This article discusses a successful collaboration between multiple subject specialist librarians, the University Archivist and a faculty member teaching an undergraduate course in documents-based social science research. This collaborative partnership allowed for each subject specialist to expose students to specific information literacy skills they needed to be successful in their class. The authors used pre- and post-assessments to gauge student comfort level in conducting library research, as well as a rubric to assess the annotated bibliography of a student’s final research paper. The data from these assessment tools are analyzed and the results discussed. The data indicates that students benefited from the specialized instruction they received.

  • Thumbnail for “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration
    “She has a vocabulary I just don’t have” : faculty culture and information literacy collaboration by Gardner, Carolyn Caffrey , White-Farnham, Jamie

    The authors describe difficulties pertaining to discipline-specific discourse and identity among collaborators during the process of revising the information literacy component of a first-year writing program. Hardesty’s term “faculty culture” offers a frame through which to understand resistance and tension among otherwise engaged faculty and situates this experience within the uncomfortable history between faculty and librarians who may be perceived as “inauthentic” faculty. The authors suggest ways to improve communication between librarians and writing program faculty when collaborating on infor-mation literacy instruction.