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  • Thumbnail for The politics of dress : the kimono in relation to Japanese society and Western fashion
    The politics of dress : the kimono in relation to Japanese society and Western fashion by Nguyen, Yumi

    My thesis focuses on the traditional Japanese kimono and the influences of this clothing form on Japanese society and fashion, and Western fashion. I address the following questions: How has the kimono affected Japanese society, both in terms of form and meaning? How have kimono design and aesthetics influenced contemporary haute couture designers in Japan? How have these contemporary Japanese designers changed perspectives on Western fashion perspectives? And finally, how has the evolution of the kimono contributed to consumer culture and social capital in Japan today?

  • Thumbnail for The sociopolitical influence of the Roman Catholic Church on abortion policy in the Dominican Republic and Cuba
    The sociopolitical influence of the Roman Catholic Church on abortion policy in the Dominican Republic and Cuba by Kaye, Charlotte H.

    This thesis tells the history of the Roman Catholic Church on the islands of Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic) and Cuba as it establishes itself as an institution. The thesis traces the history of abortion as the measuring stick for the sociopolitical influence of Catholicism on the islands. Beginning with the earliest Christian reactions towards abortion, the thesis makes the connection between church-state relations from ancient Rome up to the dictators Rafael Trujillo and Fidel Castro.

  • Thumbnail for Corporate Influence on Monetary Government Outcomes
    Corporate Influence on Monetary Government Outcomes by Newby, Seth

    The goal of this paper is to analyze the impact of corporate political contributions on the allocation of U.S subsides. This is achieved by correlating how much money a corporation spends on political investments in the form of Political Action Committee (PAC) contributions and lobbying, and how much money they receive back in the form of government monetary subsides. Using regression analysis, this study finds that for every one dollar a corporation spends on PAC contributions, there is an expected return of $4.37 dollars from the government in some form of subsidy. For every one dollar spent on lobbying, this study finds an expected return of $0.44 dollars from the government. The size and industry of the firm and the type of industry are statistically significant determinants of subsidy allocation. An ethical analysis is also performed in this thesis, and the results suggest ethically questionable practices involving corporate political action with need for reform.