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  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 03
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 03

    Detail of the memorial to the children who perished in the atomic blast on August 6, 1945, showing the statue at the memorial and strings of paper cranes left by school children visiting the memorial.

  • Thumbnail for National Identity Interim Group 2003
    National Identity Interim Group 2003

    Group picture of St. Olaf Students on Interim 2003 to China and Japan, posing on the Great Wall. Three Rows, Left to Right: Front, Sitting: Andrea Ritland, Bin Xue, Brian Swenson, Annie Haugen, Kou Vang First Standing Row (from blue jacket): Stephanie Johnson, Naoya Nishino, Phong Do. Back Row: Lauren McClain, Aiko Guevara, Emily Wiedenhoeft, Andy Bernard, Sam Lee, Angie Lau, Professor Heather Klopchin, Max Bunge, Brendan Eagan.

  • Thumbnail for Museum at My Lai, Vietnam, interior
    Museum at My Lai, Vietnam, interior

    View of the second floor interior of the museum at the Son My Vestige Area. The museum houses a combination of photographs and artifacts from the massacre site of My Lai.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 01, Peace Memorial Park
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 01, Peace Memorial Park

    On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 am, the first atomic bomb in history exploded approximately 600 meters above and 160 meters to the southeast of the Hiroshima Prefecture Industrial Promotion Hall. Because the blast was almost directly above the building, some of the walls remained standing, as did the iron structure of the dome at the top of the building. After many years of controversy, in 1966, the Hiroshima City Council passed a resolution calling for the preservation of the ruins in perpetuity, as a reminder of the tragedy of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. In December, 1996, the A-bomb Dome, as it now is called, was registered on the World Heritage List \"...as a historic witness to the tragedy of human history\'s first use of a nuclear weapon and as a universal peace monument appealing for the abolition of nuclear weapons and the realization of lasting world peace.\"

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 01
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 01

    Near the A-Bomb Dome, seen in the background here, is a memorial to children who perished in the blast. A number of middle- and high-school students were working as volunteers in factories or clearing fire lanes in the the city on the morning of the bomb blast.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 05
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 05

    School children leaving paper cranes that they have folded at the memorial.

  • Thumbnail for St. Olaf's Professor Entenmann on the Great Wall
    St. Olaf's Professor Entenmann on the Great Wall

    A perfect photo of St. Olaf history professor and Interim 2003 advisor Bob Entenmann looking out through a crenellation of the reconstructed Great Wall.

  • Thumbnail for Plaque at temple in Kuanxian near Chengdu
    Plaque at temple in Kuanxian near Chengdu

    “There are annual sacrifices to Li-Ping at his temple at Kuanhsien, and his six characters advise to ‘Dig the channels deep and keep the dykes low’ is adhered to by a yearly cleaning of the irrigation canals.†[67]

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome, 04.  Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome, 04. Peace Memorial Park.

    View 3. A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 04
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 04

    Strings of folded paper, origami, cranes left at the memorial by school children. The tradition of folding and leaving paper cranes at several locations in the peace park at Hiroshima derives from the example and life and death of Sadako Sasaki. Exposed as an infant to the radiation of the atomic bomb blast, Sadako appeared to have been unharmed until she reached the age of eleven, when she suddenly was stricken with the leukemia that claimed her life within nine months. In the story now known by school children worldwide, before her death she attempted to fold one thousand paper cranes, believing that her life would be spared if she could complete the task.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 02
    Hiroshima: Peace Park -- Memorial to children who perished in the blast, 02

    View looking up at the memorial silhouetted against the sky. The doves are bronze statues.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  View of the reborn city today  --  Skyline beyond the Peace Memorial Park
    Hiroshima: View of the reborn city today -- Skyline beyond the Peace Memorial Park

    In this view from the Peace Memorial Museum, in the middle distance we see the Cenotaph, the memorial to the victims of the atomic bomb, and in the distance beyond it, the Atomic-bomb Dome. The buildings of the reborn city of Hiroshima push in around the Peace Park, perhaps encroaching somewhat but perhaps also serving as a celebration of the resurgence of the city in the aftermath of the atomic attack. Very striking and perhaps seemingly incongruous are the “H†shaped structures to the right behind the Atomic-bomb Dome in this view – these are the light stanchions of Hiroshima Stadium, the home of the Hiroshima Carp baseball team, a major league team of the Central League. The stadium is just across the street from the northern entrance to the Peace Park and is perhaps two hundred yards from the Atomic-bomb Dome.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima, Bell at Children's Memorial
    Hiroshima, Bell at Children's Memorial

    The bell inside a sculpture dedicated to the children who suffered from the atomic bombing at Hiroshima. On the pulley of the bell hangs a golden crane, modeled after one made from origami (paper-folding).

  • Thumbnail for Shrine to Twenty-Six Martyrs
    Shrine to Twenty-Six Martyrs

    A monument in Nagasaki for 26 martyrs. They were all professed Christians of various ages, both Japanese and non-Japanese. They were made to walk from Kyoto to Nagasaki, where they were executed.

  • Thumbnail for Nagasaki Peace Park
    Nagasaki Peace Park

    This picture is of Nagasaki's Ground Zero. On August 9, 1945, the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. Three days earlier, an atomic bomb had been also been dropped on Hiroshima. About 40,000 people died instantly. About 60,000 were injured at the end.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 03, Peace Memorial Park.

    View 2. The A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima, Atom Bomb Dome
    Hiroshima, Atom Bomb Dome

    The former Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Halll, as it has stood since the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. In front is one of the three rivers that runs through Hiroshima. This site is just down the river from the bridge that was the intended target for the atomic bomb.

  • Thumbnail for Meiji Shrine
    Meiji Shrine

    The Meiji Shring is a controversial shrine for many. It is where all of the war dead are entombed, including those who were executed at the end of WWII as war criminals.

  • Thumbnail for Posing at Tiananmen
    Posing at Tiananmen

    Following a longstanding tradition, the women from St. Olaf's 2003 Interim class, National Identity in China and Japan pose at Tiananmen in Beijing. Two rows, left to right: Sitting row: Emily Wiedenhoeft, Andrea Ritland, Aiko Guevara, Annie Woudenberg. Standing Row: Professor Heather Klopchin, Angie Lau, Lauren McClain, Silje Reksnes, Sarah Rotschafer, Stephanie Johnson, Annie Haugen.

  • Thumbnail for Soviet Pavilion
    Soviet Pavilion

    An illustration of the Soviet Pavilion in Beijing. Smiling spectators point at the doves circling the pinnacle of the tower in the center.

  • Thumbnail for Independence Hall of Korea:  South Korean flag
    Independence Hall of Korea: South Korean flag

    This giant flag is made of artificial lotus flowers, the national flower and in front Independence Hall.

  • Thumbnail for Museum at My Lai, Vietnam
    Museum at My Lai, Vietnam

    View of the museum from just inside the gates of the Son My Vestige Area, better known to the world as the site of the 1968 My Lai massacre. Newly remodeled, the museum houses artifacts and photographs related to the US build up in the area, the post-Vietnam War era as well as the massacre itself.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  A-bomb Dome 02.  Plaque of dedication.
    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome 02. Plaque of dedication.

    Hiroshima: A-bomb Dome. Plaque at entrance to site of the A-bomb Dome in the Peace Memorial Park.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950
    Japan, 1951: Atomic Bomb Dome, Hiroshima, photographed in 1950

    Not all is light and color in Japan. Still there linger dark shadows of the war. This is the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce Building- target of the first atomic bomb ever used in war. This picture taken in 1950 shows leaves coming out on a tree thought to have been killed by the bomb in 1945. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Hiroshima:  Peace Park --  Memorial to children who perished  in the blast, 06