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  • Thumbnail for One Person Blows the Flute, While the Other Plays
    One Person Blows the Flute, While the Other Plays

    Illustration from Manhua showing an American military officer in the picture playing a tune on the 'flute' (actually an American missile) while the Japanese geisha provides the breath. She carries a fan labelled "Revising the Security Treaty."

  • Thumbnail for Daring English and American Soldiers Scale the Lofty Walls of Peking
    Daring English and American Soldiers Scale the Lofty Walls of Peking

    Illustration showing American and English soldiers climbing the walls of Beijing.

  • Thumbnail for Weapon - muzzle-loading pistol
    Weapon - muzzle-loading pistol

    Muzzle-loading pistol, has the tamp attached below the muzzle. Wooden handle; fittings, barrel, and tamp are all metal. If it is Japanese, it dates around 1543 because guns were outlawed early in the Edo period, and did not reappear until the Meiji era.

  • Thumbnail for Handscroll: Treatise on Samurai Armor - section two
    Handscroll: Treatise on Samurai Armor - section two

    Watercolor on paper with gold border on top and bottom of scroll, depicting drawing of parts of samurai's armor including helmet.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Post-war ruins of the German Embassy
    Japan, 1951: Post-war ruins of the German Embassy

    German embassy building rubble across the street from the National Diet Building. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Nagasaki:  American witness
    Nagasaki: American witness by Story, Louise

    Article from the New York Times, June 20, 2005, about articles written in September, 1945, by American correspondent George Weller. In the articles Mr. Weller described what he witnessed in Nagasaki shortly after the end of the war. The articles were censored by Douglas McArthur's censorship office and have only recently, 2005, finally been published. Click above to read the text of the New York Times article.

  • Thumbnail for Heartbreak
    Heartbreak

    Recipients of ashes of the war dead were hard pressed to find solace in the thought that their beloved had the honor of dying for the Emperor.

  • Thumbnail for Red Guards Parading a Pickpocket Around Beijing
    Red Guards Parading a Pickpocket Around Beijing

    The Red Guard parading one of their victims, branded a 'political pickpocket,' through the streets of Beijing, January 1967.

  • Thumbnail for Demilitarized Zone:  Joint Secret Area
    Demilitarized Zone: Joint Secret Area

    This is the place where everyday soldiers from both North and South Korea have soldiers standing off, facing one another, literally on the border between the two countries. It is a very tense situation and tourists are under strict regulation as to what they can and cannot do.

  • Thumbnail for Lacquer collage - Coca Cola and soldiers
    Lacquer collage - Coca Cola and soldiers by Luo Weidong, born 1963, Luo Weiguo, born 1964 and Luo Weibing, born 1972

    Mixed media vertical image of two Coca Cola cans, wreathed in flowers and ardent Communist supporters, all placed on a Coca Cola platform. Hands raised in support below, the figures spiraling up the cans also clasp them in their hands. A yellow and red sunburst pattern fills the background.

  • Thumbnail for Battle flag
    Battle flag

    Battle flag in the shape of a right triangle. Made of red cotton with a black cotton Chinese character in the center, which probably represents the name of the battalion.

  • Thumbnail for Tanegashima Rifle case - detail of inscription
    Tanegashima Rifle case - detail of inscription

    Flint and safety pin lacking, but otherwise in excellent condition. So, too, is the lacquered, fitted case, with its identifying mon, or crest of the daimyo clan for whom it was made. The firearm refers to one of the most interesting periods of Japanese history, and can be dated to a fairly precise time period, because such weapons did not exist in Japan before they were introduced by the Portuguese in 1543. The Portuguese had been blown off course in a storm and made landfall at Tanegashima, a small island off the coast of Kyushu (hence the name "Tanegashima" Rifle). This weapon is much more rare than a samurai sword because the time when it was in use was of such short duration. Use of such guns was banned early in the Edo period. This rifle is heavy! Metal fittings with lion on butt end. On lower surface of the rifle, metal fittings, as in sword furniture, with cloud pattern near the end (cf. smoke from firing). Halfway down is a flaming jewel. Back near the trigger, a 3-clawed dragon form in the clouds. Behind the dragon is a character on a round metal insert; then the trigger; on the bottom of the butt, another character. On the sides of the shoulder piece is further decoration (left side, cherry blossoms; right side, kara-shishi [Chinese lion-dog), and on upper surface is peony, often associated with the lion-dog in Japanese decorative arts. Above the trigger is a samurai helmet; on the metal assembly is another character, prob. the maker's symbol. Lacquered case is shaped to fit the rifle, and bears the mon of a five-petaled flower with circular petals, possibly a plum, within a circle.

  • Thumbnail for Tanegashima Rifle - detail of underside
    Tanegashima Rifle - detail of underside

    Flint and safety pin lacking, but otherwise in excellent condition. So, too, is the lacquered, fitted case, with its identifying mon, or crest of the daimyo clan for whom it was made. The firearm refers to one of the most interesting periods of Japanese history, and can be dated to a fairly precise time period, because such weapons did not exist in Japan before they were introduced by the Portuguese in 1543. The Portuguese had been blown off course in a storm and made landfall at Tanegashima, a small island off the coast of Kyushu (hence the name "Tanegashima" Rifle). This weapon is much more rare than a samurai sword because the time when it was in use was of such short duration. Use of such guns was banned early in the Edo period. This rifle is heavy! Metal fittings with lion on butt end. On lower surface of the rifle, metal fittings, as in sword furniture, with cloud pattern near the end (cf. smoke from firing). Halfway down is a flaming jewel. Back near the trigger, a 3-clawed dragon form in the clouds. Behind the dragon is a character on a round metal insert; then the trigger; on the bottom of the butt, another character. On the sides of the shoulder piece is further decoration (left side, cherry blossoms; right side, kara-shishi [Chinese lion-dog), and on upper surface is peony, often associated with the lion-dog in Japanese decorative arts. Above the trigger is a samurai helmet; on the metal assembly is another character, prob. the maker's symbol. Lacquered case is shaped to fit the rifle, and bears the mon of a five-petaled flower with circular petals, possibly a plum, within a circle.

  • Thumbnail for Wheel-thrown dark brown teabowl with brocade mat
    Wheel-thrown dark brown teabowl with brocade mat

    This teabowl, with its brocade mat and dark brown glaze, is said to have been one that was presented to soldiers upon their safe return in WWII. The teabowl has a right angle carved into the bottom of the foot; along the base of the bowl are Japanese characters; the mat is stripped aqua, mustard, forest green, orange, lavender and gray under a golden floral design with an animal all over.

  • Thumbnail for Bicycles in the City of Chengdu
    Bicycles in the City of Chengdu

    “In the last twenty years several of the city streets have been widened.†[68] On the modern, paved and widened streets photographed by Don Flaherty, bicycles now raced past rickshaws under the watchful gaze of modern police. “On the streets there are a few jeeps and civilian cars. At each bridge there is usually a broken-down truck, unable to make the grade. There are young Chinese, and foreigners of all ages on bicycles. There are many rickshaws: broken down public ones whose coolies wear straw sandals even in the coldest weather, and shiny private ones with pneumatic tires, upholstery, tiger skin lap robes, feather dusters and better dressed coolies.†[68-69]

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Abandoned children fathered by American soldiers
    Japan, 1951: Abandoned children fathered by American soldiers

    Many of them are well cared for in Christiian orphan homes-but when they are older what will they do? Most Japanese people say, 'They are yours- take them.' But what kind of a welcome awaits them in race-conscious America? --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Illustrations of the Japan-China War
    Illustrations of the Japan-China War

    Title page from a book of illustrations from the Japan-China War of 1894-1895. Features two grinning men in britches and caps holding Japan's war flag aloft.

  • Thumbnail for Oyoroi or "Great" Armor
    Oyoroi or "Great" Armor

    According to Hosokawa family tradition, this set of armor was worn in a 1358 battle in Kyoto by Hosokawa Yoriari, the founder of the family. Much of the original assemblage hat protects the body has survived: the cuirass and its pendant kusazuri (protective skirt), including the entire waidate (right side guard), and the kyubi no ita, which is suspended from the left shoulder over the chest. The two expansive osode (large upper-arm guards) are replacements dating from the sixteenth century and the sendan no ita, which would have been suspended from the right shoulder over the chest, is missing. The hoshi kabuto (star helmet) is made of narrow trapezoidal iron plates fixed with rows of neatly assembled rivets. The right-hand flap of the shikoro has lost several of its lacquered lames, a reminder of a sword blow during a fierce battle. - abridged from Shimizu, "Japan: The Shaping of Daimyo Culture".

  • Thumbnail for Demilitarized Zone ROK soldier
    Demilitarized Zone ROK soldier

    Each Republic of Korea soldier at the Demilitarized Zone looks like the soldier shown above, standing in the more intimidating and revised version of a Judo stance. Their motto is, "Everyday we face our enemy".

  • Thumbnail for Black Japanese Helmet
    Black Japanese Helmet

    Helmet, black with gold 5-petal flower emblem, red underside. Japanese helmet of the type called jingasa, 12x 13 inches. Lacquered wood in excellent condition. During the Tokugawa period, a key means of social control were the great parades of warlords and their retainers going to and from the capital city of Edo, where they were required to spend every other year in attendance upon the Shogun. These “alternate attendance†(sankin kotai) processions, up to 4,000 strong in the case of the Maeda clan, had the effect of keeping the common people of Japan in awe of the warriors. “Alternate attendance†thus helped keep the peace, something that the Shogunate was so good at doing that there was no war for the 250 years of the Tokugawa reign. As the Pax Tokugawa continued on and on, however, the Shogun and his retainers became warriors who never went to war. The actual ability to fight thus became secondary to maintaining a fearsome image. As Herman Ooms puts it in his essay in Edo: Art in Japan, 1615-1868, form became norm, and image, more important than reality. It is just this process that transformed armor into Art. Armor in the late Tokugawa Period is all about image, a point quite clear in this helmet. The helmet purports to be covered with silk that parts to reveal rough steel plates held together with large, round rivets. In fact, the helmet is made entirely of a thin, light wood covered with a layer of lacquer and gilt.

  • Thumbnail for Kozuka, detail of monkey design
    Kozuka, detail of monkey design

    Kozuka detail, mottled metal with respousse in gold and black. Design: monkey with horse on opposite side. Sheath for challenge knife (kozuka). Blackened steel and gold. Very fine workmanship and in excellent condition. This metal sheath is one of 16 in a two-layered lacquer box. Making sword fittings (menuki) has been an Art in Japan since the time of the machishu, the 17th c. Kyoto, Osaka, Sakai predecessors of the chonin of Edo (now Tokyo), the latter being the creators of Ukiyo-e. This sheath is of extremely high quality, something true of others in its group. Any are fit for a museum, but I chose this one because its decoration was so amusing. In Japan, the horse is a standard gift to a temple. When a horse is too expensive, a painting of a horse (ema) can be substituted. This knife sheath bears an image of an ema on one side. The square frame of the ema is shown and within it, a monkey holding a long line. The line goes outside the ema over to the other side of the sheath. There, the tethered horse gallops away.

  • Thumbnail for Tanegashima Rifle - detail of muzzle end
    Tanegashima Rifle - detail of muzzle end

    Flint and safety pin lacking, but otherwise in excellent condition. So, too, is the lacquered, fitted case, with its identifying mon, or crest of the daimyo clan for whom it was made. The firearm refers to one of the most interesting periods of Japanese history, and can be dated to a fairly precise time period, because such weapons did not exist in Japan before they were introduced by the Portuguese in 1543. The Portuguese had been blown off course in a storm and made landfall at Tanegashima, a small island off the coast of Kyushu (hence the name "Tanegashima" Rifle). This weapon is much more rare than a samurai sword because the time when it was in use was of such short duration. Use of such guns was banned early in the Edo period. This rifle is heavy! Metal fittings with lion on butt end. On lower surface of the rifle, metal fittings, as in sword furniture, with cloud pattern near the end (cf. smoke from firing). Halfway down is a flaming jewel. Back near the trigger, a 3-clawed dragon form in the clouds. Behind the dragon is a character on a round metal insert; then the trigger; on the bottom of the butt, another character. On the sides of the shoulder piece is further decoration (left side, cherry blossoms; right side, kara-shishi [Chinese lion-dog), and on upper surface is peony, often associated with the lion-dog in Japanese decorative arts. Above the trigger is a samurai helmet; on the metal assembly is another character, prob. the maker's symbol. Lacquered case is shaped to fit the rifle, and bears the mon of a five-petaled flower with circular petals, possibly a plum, within a circle.

  • Thumbnail for Wheel-thrown dark brown teabowl with brocade mat
    Wheel-thrown dark brown teabowl with brocade mat

    This teabowl, with its brocade mat and dark brown glaze, is said to have been one that was presented to soldiers upon their safe return in WWII. The teabowl has a right angle carved into the bottom of the foot; along the base of the bowl are Japanese characters; the mat is stripped aqua, mustard, forest green, orange, lavender and gray under a golden floral design with an animal all over.

  • Thumbnail for Tanegashima Rifle - detail of mechanism metalwork
    Tanegashima Rifle - detail of mechanism metalwork

    Flint and safety pin lacking, but otherwise in excellent condition. So, too, is the lacquered, fitted case, with its identifying mon, or crest of the daimyo clan for whom it was made. The firearm refers to one of the most interesting periods of Japanese history, and can be dated to a fairly precise time period, because such weapons did not exist in Japan before they were introduced by the Portuguese in 1543. The Portuguese had been blown off course in a storm and made landfall at Tanegashima, a small island off the coast of Kyushu (hence the name "Tanegashima" Rifle). This weapon is much more rare than a samurai sword because the time when it was in use was of such short duration. Use of such guns was banned early in the Edo period. This rifle is heavy! Metal fittings with lion on butt end. On lower surface of the rifle, metal fittings, as in sword furniture, with cloud pattern near the end (cf. smoke from firing). Halfway down is a flaming jewel. Back near the trigger, a 3-clawed dragon form in the clouds. Behind the dragon is a character on a round metal insert; then the trigger; on the bottom of the butt, another character. On the sides of the shoulder piece is further decoration (left side, cherry blossoms; right side, kara-shishi [Chinese lion-dog), and on upper surface is peony, often associated with the lion-dog in Japanese decorative arts. Above the trigger is a samurai helmet; on the metal assembly is another character, prob. the maker's symbol. Lacquered case is shaped to fit the rifle, and bears the mon of a five-petaled flower with circular petals, possibly a plum, within a circle.

  • Thumbnail for Tanegashima Rifle
    Tanegashima Rifle

    Flint and safety pin lacking, but otherwise in excellent condition. So, too, is the lacquered, fitted case, with its identifying mon, or crest of the daimyo clan for whom it was made. The firearm refers to one of the most interesting periods of Japanese history, and can be dated to a fairly precise time period, because such weapons did not exist in Japan before they were introduced by the Portuguese in 1543. The Portuguese had been blown off course in a storm and made landfall at Tanegashima, a small island off the coast of Kyushu (hence the name "Tanegashima" Rifle). This weapon is much more rare than a samurai sword because the time when it was in use was of such short duration. Use of such guns was banned early in the Edo period. This rifle is heavy! Metal fittings with lion on butt end. On lower surface of the rifle, metal fittings, as in sword furniture, with cloud pattern near the end (cf. smoke from firing). Halfway down is a flaming jewel. Back near the trigger, a 3-clawed dragon form in the clouds. Behind the dragon is a character on a round metal insert; then the trigger; on the bottom of the butt, another character. On the sides of the shoulder piece is further decoration (left side, cherry blossoms; right side, kara-shishi [Chinese lion-dog), and on upper surface is peony, often associated with the lion-dog in Japanese decorative arts. Above the trigger is a samurai helmet; on the metal assembly is another character, prob. the maker's symbol. Lacquered case is shaped to fit the rifle, and bears the mon of a five-petaled flower with circular petals, possibly a plum, within a circle.