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  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 026, village on Jialing (River) above Chongqing, Sichuan
    Thorp Collection 026, village on Jialing (River) above Chongqing, Sichuan

    Village on Jialing (River) above Chongqing, Sichuan. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 06, Population density, urbanization, seismic risk, high-rise buildings, Shinjuku, Tokyo.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 06, Population density, urbanization, seismic risk, high-rise buildings, Shinjuku, Tokyo.

    Population density, urbanization, seismic risk, high-rise buildings, Shinjuku, Tokyo. -- Increased population and urbanization, combined with the scarcity and consequent high cost of land, leads to the construction of high-rise buildings in many cities. The potential danger in areas of frequent seismic activity is obvious. Modern high-rise buildings in Japan are engineered to strict earthquake codes, but the final test will be the next big quake.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 03, Land use, urbanization, high population density, seismic risk, Tokyo.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 03, Land use, urbanization, high population density, seismic risk, Tokyo.

    Land use, urbanization, high population density, seismic risk, Tokyo. -- Because of its location above convergent crustal plate boundaries, Japan records about 5,000 earthquakes a year. On average, one to three earthquakes can be felt at any locality each month, and the historical frequency of major earthquake disasters in Japan is about one every ten years. Hazards associated with earthquakes include ground shaking, fire, landslides, and tsunami along the coastline. The great 1923 Tokyo earthquake left 143,000 people dead or missing, 103,000 injured, and about 250,000 homes damaged or destroyed. With a high population density, high rise buildings, increased population and commuters, the toll from the next Tokyo earthquake may be even greater.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 12, Flat land used for new suburbs west of Morioka.
    Landscapes of Japan, 12, Flat land used for new suburbs west of Morioka.

    Flat land used for new suburbs west of Morioka. -- This illustrates how a burgeoning population and demand for housing leads to suburban sprawl onto available flat land. The ridges remain forested while the flat alluvial plain is occupied by new homes. Previously this was agricultural land.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Rebuilding in the Post-War Period, Construction in central Tokyo.
    Japan, 1951: Rebuilding in the Post-War Period, Construction in central Tokyo.

    Beginning the International Building in central Tokyo. the steelwork allows some flexibility to accomodate for the earthquake shocks. The weight of the steel structure causes it to sink into the swamp on which Tokyo is built, similar to those of Chicago and Shangai. The sign tells that the building has already sunk 18 of the 50 feet required for the four subtererrean stories. A maximum of 9 stories are permitted above ground. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  View of the Ginza
    Japan, 1951: View of the Ginza

    The Ginza from my office window. 'Largest PX in the World' Area where buildings were destroyed by American bombs. A modern subway runs below the surface. This city now is the largest in the world. --This was the description to accompany this image, as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of images for his family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Japanese Street Scene
    Japanese Street Scene

    These classically designed Japanese buildings speak of older times. They could be found in any city in Japan, although these happen to stand on the famous island of Miyajima. The building in the middle is a restaurant that I ended up eating a fantastic meal of cold ramen, boiled eggs, and fresh vegetables.

  • Thumbnail for Seoul, South Korea
    Seoul, South Korea

    Seoul is one of the most populated cities in the world and is plagued with pollution. This picture shows a small section of Seoul.

  • Thumbnail for Seoul apartment complexes
    Seoul apartment complexes

    Because it is so expensive to have a large piece of property in Seoul, many people live in apartments which can be seen above the city horizon in almost any district.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 195, Hangzhon.
    Thorp Collection 195, Hangzhon.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 084, Sunrise - Hanzhou, Zhejiang
    Thorp Collection 084, Sunrise - Hanzhou, Zhejiang

    Sunrise - Hanzhou, Zhejiang. This image and all othrs identified as I.D.Nos. ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing."

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 14, Flat land used for cities, Tokyo viewed from the top of Tokyo Tower.
    Landscapes of Japan, 14, Flat land used for cities, Tokyo viewed from the top of Tokyo Tower.

    Flat land used for cities, Tokyo viewed from the top of Tokyo Tower. -- Flat land is scarce and very valuable in Japan. It is the most productive agricultural land, and also the easiest land upon which to build. Consequently. there is great competition and tension between development and agricultural interests. As the population increases and more people move from rural to urban areas, Japanese cities continue to expand and an increasing proportion of flat land is lost to agricultural and other uses.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Hand digging foundations, post-war reconstruction
    Japan, 1951: Hand digging foundations, post-war reconstruction

    Digging for new foundations to replace buildings destroyed during the war. The picks are brought down with powerful strokes. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script", was to accompany a slide show of the images for family and others.

  • Thumbnail for Street Scene
    Street Scene

    Pedestrians clad in winter coats walk the streets. A pair of bright yellow street cars bedecked with garlands stand in the background.

  • Thumbnail for Shanghai Bund, 1925
    Shanghai Bund, 1925

    A Keystone stereo view of the Bund in Shanghai, circa 1925.

  • Thumbnail for Yonsei University:  Millennium Hall
    Yonsei University: Millennium Hall

    This is taken from the Millennium Hall on the Yonsei University campus where most of the classes for the exchange students attend further ahead on the right is the Korean Language Institute where the language classes are held and further beyond is the rest of the city outside the East Gate.

  • Thumbnail for Singapore's Chinatown
    Singapore's Chinatown

    Chinatown with decorations for Chinese New Year which was 2005-02-09.

  • Thumbnail for Singapore's Chinatown
    Singapore's Chinatown

    Chinatown in Singapore. This was taken a few days before the Chinese New Year in February.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 037, below Chongqing
    Thorp Collection 037, below Chongqing

    Below Chongqing. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 087, Guiyang from Temple. Guizhou
    Thorp Collection 087, Guiyang from Temple. Guizhou

    Guiyang from Temple. Guizhou. This image and all othrs identified as I.D.Nos. ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing."

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 088, Guiyang from wall, Guizhou
    Thorp Collection 088, Guiyang from wall, Guizhou

    Guiyang from wall, Guizhou. This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. No. ecasia000072, ""Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing.""

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 05,Urban population density, seismic risk, Pontocho Street, Kyoto.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 05,Urban population density, seismic risk, Pontocho Street, Kyoto.

    Urban population density, seismic risk, Pontocho Street, Kyoto. -- Earthquake hazards include not only initial ground shaking, but also fire from broken pipelines, downed electrical wires, damaged heating systems, etc. In crowded Japanese cities with narrow streets and many old wooden buildings, such as this, fire can spread rapidly, and with broken water pipes and debris-filled streets blocking emergency vehicles, timely fire-fighting and rescue operations may be difficult or impossible.

  • Thumbnail for Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 04, Climatic implications, rain, Ginza, Tokyo.
    Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 04, Climatic implications, rain, Ginza, Tokyo.

    Climatic implications, rain, Ginza, Tokyo. -- Many Japanese rivers are short and have steep gradients flowing out of mountainous terrain. This assures that runoff from storms will be rapid, and where these rivers empty onto plains flash flooding may occur. Further adding to the flood hazard is a climate that periodically causes heavy rain over short periods of time. Rainfall of eight inches or more is not uncommon during the typhoon season, especially in southwestern Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 13, Bayhead bar beach and coastal village of Hiraiga.
    Landscapes of Japan, 13, Bayhead bar beach and coastal village of Hiraiga.

    Bayhead bar beach and coastal village of Hiraiga. -- Along this mountainous coastline, flat land is scarce. The homes and buildings of the small village of Hiraiga are crammed into nearly every piece of reasonably flat land above the high tide line. In much of Japan, rugged mountains separate the small areas of flat land upon which villages could be built causing the villages to be isolated from one another. The scarcity of flat land also leads to concentration of the Japanese population into those areas flat enough to build upon.

  • Thumbnail for Japan, 1951:  Detail, Construction of the International Building in central Tokyo.
    Japan, 1951: Detail, Construction of the International Building in central Tokyo.

    Beginning the International Building in central Tokyo. The steelwork allows some flexibility to accomodate for the earthquake shocks. the weight of the steel structure causes it to sink into the swamp on which Tokyo is built, similar to those of Chicago and Shangai. The sign tells that the building has already sunk 18 of the 50 feet required for the four subtererrean stories. A maximum of 9 stories are permitted above ground. --This was the description to accompany this image as written by Arthur O. Rinden, the photographer. His description, which he referred to as a "script" was to accompany a slide show of the images for his family and others.