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  • Thumbnail for On the relationship between gender wage differentials and market power in U.S. manufacturing
    On the relationship between gender wage differentials and market power in U.S. manufacturing by Wiggy, Mitchell

    There has been a persistent earnings gap between male and female workers in the United States over the past decades. This study examines one possible cause for this discrepancy by analyzing its relationship with market power within the manufacturing industry. Theory suggests that firms with market power have more leverage to practice discrimination toward a specific group of workers, resulting in a wage differential. This study finds that market power does not play a statistically significant role in the creation of wage differentials between male and female workers.

  • Thumbnail for Middle school matters : a duration model analysis of college enrollments
    Middle school matters : a duration model analysis of college enrollments by Benson, Cassandra Michele

    Since the 1980s women have surpassed men in undergraduate college enrollments. This trend for a higher percentage of women in higher education has continued, and in 2007 women officially dominated all levels of higher education including doctoral degrees. Understanding why women have increased enrollments is simple; education acts as a social equalizer and provides opportunities to women that were not previously obtainable. The puzzling factor of this progression stems from men’s trajectory, which plateaus around the 1980s. This project addresses the question of what factors inhibit or promote longer tenures in the academic pipeline for men and women. The hypothesis argues that men and women react differently to certain family factors such as parenting style, income, the age of the mother, household issues, and youth behavioral characteristics. These differing reactions would be the driving force for the gender education gap in the United States. Using an Ordinary Least Squares estimate, a Tobit estimate, and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, it appears that gender itself is not the determining factor of duration in college. While men and women are not statistically different from one another, they do react different to parenting styles, income, and role model influences of parents. This study corroborates previous work on the importance of income and innate academic ability for duration in college. However, this study also finds that middle school performance is highly influential of determining an individual’s college enrollment. Therefore, to increase the likelihood and duration of an individual’s college education middle schools should focus on providing an environment conducive to engaging both men and women.