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  • Thumbnail for Environmental, Social, and Governance Ratings and Its Effects on Corporate Financial Performance of Financial Companies
    Environmental, Social, and Governance Ratings and Its Effects on Corporate Financial Performance of Financial Companies by Brandstrader, Annie Zheng

    This paper examines Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) ratings and their correlation to the stock price of 59 US financial firms. The ESG ratings used were from CSRHub and the company stock prices were from yahoo.finance.com taken on a monthly basis for four years spanning from August 2014 to July 2018. An empirical model based on panel data was used to determine whether each rating category had a positive or negative effect on a company’s stock price. The data was conclusive in showing that the environmental, governance, and subcategory of employees had a positive impact on company stock price, and the overall social rating and the subcategory community rating had a negative impact on company stock price.

  • Thumbnail for The Effect of Experiencing a Salient Extreme Weather Event on Climate Change Attitudes and Policy Support
    The Effect of Experiencing a Salient Extreme Weather Event on Climate Change Attitudes and Policy Support by Mathieson, Rebecca Elizabeth

    Climate change concern remains remarkably low in the United States despite extensive evidence of its current and future negative impacts on the planet. Previous research suggests this is because people perceive climate change as a distant risk that will not affect them personally. This study investigates whether experiencing an extreme adverse weather event such as the 2012-2016 California drought reduces the psychological distance of the issue, and leads those who experienced the weather event to have higher levels of concern about climate change. Using data from a survey administered to California, Oregon, and Washington residents in February 2017, regression analysis was performed to evaluate the hypotheses. It was expected that those living in California who had experienced the drought would express higher levels of concern over climate change than those in Oregon or Washington who had not experienced the drought. Additionally, it was hypothesized that those who experienced the drought would also be more likely to support environmental policy aimed at mitigating climate change than those with no drought experience. The first model in the study showed that drought experience on its own does not lead to higher levels of climate change concern. It was found, however, that experiencing climate change to a lesser degree, such as observing warming temperatures, does increase concern. The second model showed that those who express higher levels of concern over climate change are much more likely to support environmental policy.

  • Thumbnail for 2010-2011 Speaker series: Are our forests dying? Forest health in the Rockies
    2010-2011 Speaker series: Are our forests dying? Forest health in the Rockies

    Presents list of lectures for the 2010-11 Colorado College State of the Rockies speaker series: Are the trees falling? How pine beetle and wildfire shape Rocky Mountain forests / Dave Theobald, Jason Sibold -- Big burn: the lasting legacy of the nation’s largest wildfire / Timothy Egan -- The White is turning red: case study of the White River National Forest / Tony Dixon, Jan Burke -- Colorado State Government & forests: controversy over health, climate and roads / Mike King, Nolan Doesken -- Environmental groups and public involvement in forest health decisions / Suzanne Jones, Sloan Shoemaker -- Private solutions: ownership, philosophy, management.

  • Thumbnail for Opposition to Federal Climate Policy and Action: A Case Study on Evangelical Protestants
  • Thumbnail for Building the climate movement
    Building the climate movement by McKibben, Bill

    Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded September 18, 2007.

  • Thumbnail for Conserving biodiversity : a qualitative method for analyzing federal environmental policies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
    Conserving biodiversity : a qualitative method for analyzing federal environmental policies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem by Williams, Samuel Parker

    Biological diversity includes the variance in genes, organisms, and relationships found in nature. Also called biodiversity, it provides countless economic, social, and personal benefits to people in the United States and all over the world. In the U.S., this is recognized by the federal government most explicitly in the Endangered Species Act’s protections for those flora and fauna whose survival is least likely and most endangered by human action. Unfortunately, there are many anthropogenic threats to biological diversity. In order to protect this incredible natural resource, responsible management must be implemented across all levels of government. Given the amount of funding, large spatial scales, and public interest at stake, the federal government is the best suited to this task. The federal government must play a key role in the protection of biological diversity. The purpose of this paper is to provide a qualitative analysis of the federal government’s management of biological diversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Examining management at these scales is uncommon, yet extremely valuable. By examining management on scales that coincide with the scale of natural processes, we can better see the broad implications and interactions of our management policies. We can also determine how to sharpen management in order to more accurately address these important scales. In order to achieve this, a basic overview of modern conservation science and terms to be utilized will be provided. Building upon this overview, four categories will be describe, which, according to the science, are vital to the preservation of biological diversity. These categories are cores, connectivity, restoration, and monitoring. There will be three standards used to assess the quality of policy. Scientific foundations, the human-nature nexus, and adaptability are these three measures. The Greater Yellowstone ecosystem will then be described. Finally, in each of the four categories, examples of policy or management action will be described and analyzed via the three measures of successful policy. This analysis shall provide examples of policies with varying degrees of success. By extrapolating management from these representative case studies, an aggregate picture of management across the ecosystem will be gained. It is hoped that such analysis will uncover areas where management may be improved and facilitate the spread of successful policies and management ideas. It is also intended as a suitable framework for examining and creating biodiversity management policies in other ecosystems, regions, and countries.

  • Thumbnail for State of the Rockies lecture: 2011 Champion of the Rockies award presentation
    State of the Rockies lecture: 2011 Champion of the Rockies award presentation by Williams, Terry Tempest

    CC President Richard Celeste awarded the 2011 Champion of the Rockies Award to conservationist, advocate for free speech, and author of "Refuge," Terry Tempest Williams. Terry Tempest Williams addresses the audience with several selected readings. Recorded April 4, 2011.