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  • Thumbnail for How can colleges increase enrollment through marketing?
    How can colleges increase enrollment through marketing? by Nkambule, Banele

    The objective of this thesis is to improve higher education marketing and, thus, increase enrollments. The key to successfully enhance recruitment efforts and marketing strategies is knowing students’ preferences, evaluating the institution, and learning more about the competition. This thesis creates a model that shows the effects of admitted student’s preferences on enrollment. Data from Admitted Students’ Questionnaire are used to test this model. Moreover, the thesis also creates a model that shows higher education institutions’ performance and how performance is affected by competition. The higher education institutions examined in this thesis are Colorado College, Colgate University and Wake Forest University

  • Thumbnail for Colorado College : unique intellectual adventure
    Colorado College : unique intellectual adventure

    Brief promotional video clip describing student life at Colorado College.

  • Thumbnail for Peer effects at Colorado College
    Peer effects at Colorado College by Yim, Heidi

    Peer effects in institutions of higher education are often measured in terms of differences in student achievement after interaction with able peers. This paper uses an empirical approach to analyze peer effects on student achievement in classrooms at Colorado College. Under an ordinary least squares model, student academic rating is employed as a proxy for ability – understood to be student “quality” for the purposes of this paper – and the 4.0 GPA scale-equivalent of the grade received in a class is employed as a proxy for achievement. Specific focus is placed on the potential effects that international students and student athletes may have on the achievement of their peers. If these focus groups pose any effects, how do these effects vary with course division (humanities, natural sciences, social sciences)? This paper finds evidence of the existence of peer effects at Colorado College; specifically, international students have a large positive effect on the achievement of non-international students, and the greatest benefit from peer effects occurs in humanities courses.

  • Thumbnail for Academic freedom: fragile as ever
    Academic freedom: fragile as ever by Bérubé, Michael, 1961-

    Michael Berube, author of "Higher Education Under Fire: Politics, Economics, and the Crisis of the Humanities" and "What's Liberal About the Liberal Arts? Classroom Politics and 'Bias' in Education" argues against the common notion that higher education is a bastion of the left. Part of Notable Lectures & Performances series, Colorado College. Recorded November 2, 2006.

  • Thumbnail for The effect of education expenditures on income inequality
    The effect of education expenditures on income inequality by Lynch, Michael Francis

    Income inequality has steadily increased in the United States since the census bureau began officially accounting for it in 1967. Over thirty-percent of American income has been concentrated with the top 5% of income earners since 1976. This study examines the notion that education expenditures have an equalizing effect on income inequality. Based on a panel dataset of fifty states over twenty years from 1986-2005, this research examines the effect of total current education expenditures and sector specific expenditures on the Gini-coefficient. A fixed effects regression model, applied with lagged expenditure data, shows that education only reduces income inequality in the long-run.

  • Thumbnail for A score unsettled : a reexamination of athletic success and alumni giving
    A score unsettled : a reexamination of athletic success and alumni giving by Thorne, Tyler

    In recent years, state appropriations to higher education decreased. In response, universities of all sizes, both public and private, are forced to shift many of the associated burdens to their students in the form of increasing tuition rates and decreasing institutional quality to cut costs. As such, increasing alumni giving rates is essential to all institutions of higher education as they seek to maintain high academic standards, attract the best prospects, and foster future growth and financial stability. There is a large body of research seeking to address these pressing issues in higher education, many focusing on athletics as a stimulus for alumni giving. This paper builds upon the existing literature and ultimately answers the question: how does athletic success affect alumni giving? A fifteen-year panel data set comprised of 65 Division I universities is examined and the results show an insignificant relationship between athletic success and alumni giving. However, the analysis informs the influence of the macroeconomy and parameters for institutional quality. While athletics do not provide any substantial predictive power in this paper, the significance of other explanatory variables justifies this re-examination of athletics and alumni giving and explicitly highlights further avenues for research.

  • Thumbnail for The hidden challenges of "class" : social class and race at Colorado College
    The hidden challenges of "class" : social class and race at Colorado College by Callahan, Kathleen

    This study examines the effects of social class, race, and cultural capital on academic experience and social belonging at Colorado College. Survey data from a sample of Colorado College students about academic and social engagement at CC is analyzed in an attempt to explore how students are impacted by their social class, race, and cultural capital. Specifically, this study analyzes classroom engagement, intellectual confidence, and social belonging at Colorado College, focusing primarily on how social class and race/ethnicity intersect in ways to affect educational and social outcomes. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which “doubly disadvantaged” students, those who are first generation college students and students of color experience unique challenges at a predominantly white institution. The analysis suggests that first generation students of color face more challenges in the classroom and feel less connected to the student body than their peers. The study’s findings suggest that more attention and support need to be given to the “doubly disadvantaged” to help increase their academic and social engagement at CC. Additionally, this study advocates more research be done on the inequalities that working class minority students face within the education system.

  • Thumbnail for Expensive decisions : how students choose their college majors in a changing economy
    Expensive decisions : how students choose their college majors in a changing economy by Putnam, Laura

    All undergraduate college students face the important decision of what major to graduate with. This important choice affects their future careers and current happiness while in college. A number of factors go into this decision-making practice, including ability, preferences, and demographic trends. This paper hypothesizes that students also care about the current state of the economy. The data used in this multinomial logit model comes from eleven years of data on Colorado College graduates. After analyzing the results at the division and major level, the hypothesis proved to be weak in the Colorado College population. Six out of twenty-eight majors significantly responded to the independent variable measuring the national unemployment rate, although none of the majors responded drastically. Overall, an increase in the unemployment rate led to more economics, mathematical economics, and environmental studies majors while a decrease led to more physics, religion and English majors.

  • Thumbnail for Welcome from Dean Susan Ashley
    Welcome from Dean Susan Ashley

    Brief promotional video featuring Susan Ashley, Dean of the College and Faculty. Dean Ashley discusses the exceptional learning experience new students will encounter under Colorado College's Block Plan.

  • Thumbnail for Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective
    Campus collaboration from a martial arts perspective by Perini, Michael

    Thinkers have been applying longstanding martial arts philosophies to a variety of professional genres for years, particularly in the business realm. Where these ideas find less traction, though, is in the field of education, specifically higher education, as some of the philosophies operate better in the boardroom than in academe. However, much of the experience associated with martial arts provides an alternate prism to view conflicts and difficulties within higher education and, specifically, for my purposes, in libraries. This discussion draws on my experience as a martial artist as well as my theoretical and experiential learning in higher education and academic libraries in order to expand the conversation on collaboration.