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  • Thumbnail for Expensive decisions : how students choose their college majors in a changing economy
    Expensive decisions : how students choose their college majors in a changing economy by Putnam, Laura

    All undergraduate college students face the important decision of what major to graduate with. This important choice affects their future careers and current happiness while in college. A number of factors go into this decision-making practice, including ability, preferences, and demographic trends. This paper hypothesizes that students also care about the current state of the economy. The data used in this multinomial logit model comes from eleven years of data on Colorado College graduates. After analyzing the results at the division and major level, the hypothesis proved to be weak in the Colorado College population. Six out of twenty-eight majors significantly responded to the independent variable measuring the national unemployment rate, although none of the majors responded drastically. Overall, an increase in the unemployment rate led to more economics, mathematical economics, and environmental studies majors while a decrease led to more physics, religion and English majors.

  • Thumbnail for Assessing the probability of bank failure : a snapshot of banks regulated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation  from 1998–1999 and 2001–2002
    Assessing the probability of bank failure : a snapshot of banks regulated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation from 1998–1999 and 2001–2002 by Scherer, Madeline Delaney

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was created in 1933. Today, the FDIC’s presence and monitoring ensures that banks are and remain solvent. Although the FDIC does everything in its power to prevent a bank from failing, bank failure can still occur, even in times of relative economic stability. Using a Probit regression analysis, this study assesses the probability of bank failure by looking at 102 different banks, eight different financial variables, and six geographic region variables during the time periods of 1998–1999 and 2001–2002. The geographic location variable is used to investigate if failures occur more often in certain regions of the country or in more urban or rural areas. In the end, none of the financial variables were statistically significant, whereas the regional geographic variables were. This suggests that during a period of relative economic stability, regional economic conditions affect bank failures more so than financial variables.

  • Thumbnail for The economics of recent U.S. mergers and acquisitions
    The economics of recent U.S. mergers and acquisitions by Huang, Xiaoke

    This study examines the influences of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) on companies' profitability and compares these influences with economic conditions to discuss their significance. It hypothesizes that market power, total assets and synergistic effects are all positively related to profitability, but they are less significant than the economic influences such as economic growth, consumer confidence and producer confidence. Focusing on the largest U.S. mergers and acquisitions during the period from 1998 to 2003, two economic models are designed to test these hypotheses. The first model examines the relationship between M&A influences and profitability. The test results of this model suggest that market power and total assets are both significant to profitability and that synergistic effects are insignificant. The study also finds that increasing market power is 50 times more efficient than increasing total assets in generating profit. The second model examines the relationship between the economic influences and profitability, but the tests results are inconclusive and suggest that economic factors and profitability have non-linear correlations