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  • Thumbnail for The New Glass Ceiling: Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth
    The New Glass Ceiling: Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth by Corwin, Theodore, III

    The United States incarcerates its citizens at rates higher than those of any other developed nation in the world, straining both its budgets and communities. The long-run effects of incarceration have been receiving more attention in the past two decades, but little research addresses incarceration’s effects on earnings trajectory. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for 1997, I implement propensity score matching to model the treatment effects of incarceration on wage growth rates, controlling for individual characteristics that influence labor market outcomes.

  • Thumbnail for Universities, industries and your wallet : university impacts on earnings per worker
    Universities, industries and your wallet : university impacts on earnings per worker by Berglund, Hanna

    Research university impacts are difficult to measure, but vital to understanding the economic development surrounding these universities. This study examines whether research universities in the United States contribute significantly to regional economic development and whether agglomeration economies explain earnings per worker based on university presence or not. Drawing on county-by-county data for the first time, more precisely highlights more specifically the differences between regions with universities and regions without. The effects of university presence, federal, state and institutional research and development expenditures, and industry presence on earnings per worker are tested using multivariate regression analysis. The study finds that university presence alone impacts the presence of industries related to science and technology. University impact measurements are becoming more important as universities compete for government funding.

  • Thumbnail for The New Glass Ceiling: Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth
    The New Glass Ceiling: Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth by Corwin, Theodore, III

    The United States incarcerates its citizens at rates higher than those of any other developed nation in the world, straining both its budgets and communities. The long-run effects of incarceration have been receiving more attention in the past two decades, but little research addresses incarceration’s effects on earnings trajectory. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for 1997, I implement propensity score matching to model the treatment effects of incarceration on wage growth rates, controlling for individual characteristics that influence labor market outcomes.

  • Thumbnail for The New Glass Ceiling: Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth
    The New Glass Ceiling: Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth by Corwin, Theodore, III

    The United States incarcerates its citizens at rates higher than those of any other developed nation in the world, straining both its budgets and communities. The long-run effects of incarceration have been receiving more attention in the past two decades, but little research addresses incarceration’s effects on earnings trajectory. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for 1997, I implement propensity score matching to model the treatment effects of incarceration on wage growth rates, controlling for individual characteristics that influence labor market outcomes.

  • Thumbnail for The New Glass Ceiling Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth
    The New Glass Ceiling Incarceration’s Effects on Lifetime Wage Growth by Corwin, Theodore, III

    The United States incarcerates its citizens at rates higher than those of any other developed nation in the world, straining both its budgets and communities. The long-run effects of incarceration have been receiving more attention in the past two decades, but little research addresses incarceration’s effects on earnings trajectory. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for 1997, I implement propensity score matching to model the treatment effects of incarceration on wage growth rates, controlling for individual characteristics that influence labor market outcomes.