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  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 158, Boats-Lake Hupei, N. Donting.
    Thorp Collection 158, Boats-Lake Hupei, N. Donting.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Skiing
    Skiing

    People skiing during their vacation.

  • Thumbnail for Dan McClintock
    Dan McClintock

    Picture of Dan McClintock, Yao Ming's American replacement, playing for the Shanghai Sharks against the Guangdong Southern Tigers, in Shanghai.

  • Thumbnail for Game Center
    Game Center

    Yuuki Yoshida, enjoying a taiko drumming game.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo throws 4
    Sumo throws 4

    Examples of the sumo throws Makiotoshi, Katasukashi, Amiuchi, Sotomuso, Uchimuso, Zubuneri, Sabaori, Kainabineri, Hatakikomi, and Hikiotoshi.

  • Thumbnail for Diamond Dolls Japanese Baseball Team
    Diamond Dolls Japanese Baseball Team

    Baseball teams organized in 1950 for women was one of the many by-products of the American occupation of Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 11, Beach at Noda.
    Landscapes of Japan, 11, Beach at Noda.

    Beach at Noda. -- Where there are indentations or bays along coastlines, wave action is reduced. In these more sheltered environments sediment which has been carried along the coast or brought to the bay by rivers from the land, may accumulate forming bars and beaches. If such deposition continues for a period of time, the bay may gradually fill, producing a level plain in the former coastal indentation. There are many such coastal plains along the Japanese shoreline, most of them small and isolated. -- Here, at Noda, barriers have been placed just offshore to further reduce wave action and promote deposition and beach formation and retention.

  • Thumbnail for Olympics
    Olympics

    Sakai Yoshinori, born in the rubble of the bomb blast at Hiroshima, anchored the relay of runners who brought the sacred flame from Olympia, Greece to Tokyo, Japan. Here he stands in National Stadium an instant after lighting the torch that officially opened the 1964 Olympics.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo throws 3
    Sumo throws 3

    Examples of the sumo throws Sotogake, Kirikaeshi, Kawazugake, Ketaguri, Watashikomi, Nintaigeri, Komatasukui, Tasukizori, Uttchari, and Tottari.

  • Thumbnail for Olympics Opening Ceremony:  Stockholm
    Olympics Opening Ceremony: Stockholm

    A marathon team, the first Japanese delegation to participate, was entered in the Fifth Olympic Games at Stockholm in 1912.

  • Thumbnail for Landscapes of Japan, 19, Coastal features, deeply embayed Pacific coast, Yamada.
    Landscapes of Japan, 19, Coastal features, deeply embayed Pacific coast, Yamada.

    Coastal features, deeply embayed Pacific coast, Yamada. -- The coastline at Yamada is irregular with large bays separated by mountainous promontories that jut into the sea. (Compare this coastline with the straight one shown in slide 1.18.) This kind of coastline can be produced where rocks and geological structures trend across the coastline so that shoreline erosion of weaker rocks produces bays while more resistant rocks are left as headlands and promontories. It can also result from submergence of a mountainous land surface where the flooded valleys form bays and the mountains stand above the sea.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo throws 2
    Sumo throws 2

    Examples of the throws Abisetaoshi, Okuridashi, Uwatenage, Shitatenage, Kotenage, Sukuinage, Uwatedashinage, Shitatedashinage, Kubinage, Nichonage, Kaakenage, and Uchigake.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo throws 1
    Sumo throws 1

    Four ways to throw an opponent in sumo: Oshidashi, Tsukidashi, Tsukiotoshi, and Yorikiri.

  • Thumbnail for Baseball in Japan during the Occupation
    Baseball in Japan during the Occupation

    The San Francisco Seals were the first pro baseball team to come to Japan after WWII. This photo shows Lefty O'Doul posing with young fans. At his right is Mizuhara Shigeru, then manager of the Yomiuri Giants.

  • Thumbnail for Olympic Stadium
    Olympic Stadium

    This is Olympic Stadium where the 1988 Olympics had taken place. This stadium is now being used for other sporting events, as well as concerts and celebrations. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Thorp Collection 159, Yangtze boats, N. Donting.
    Thorp Collection 159, Yangtze boats, N. Donting.

    This image and all others identified as ecasia000072 through ecasia000278, are scans of images from the James Thorp Collection, Earlham College. An explanation and description of the collection and its origin are included in the description of image I.D. ecasia000072, "Altar of Heaven at night, Beijing," the first Thorp image presented in this project collection.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo Champion
    Sumo Champion

    Futabayam Sadaji (1912-1968) remains a magic name in sumo. The 35th Yokozuna, his record of 69 straight wins still stands. This is a picture of him after he won the summer tournament in 1936.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo match
    Sumo match

    After the establishment of the first Shogunate in Kamakura from 1185 to 1392, Sumo came to be practiced by the warrior class. Minamoto no Yoritomo, the most famous Shogun of the era, was a huge Sumo fan. Oda Nobunga (1534-82) was particularly fond of Sumo. In February of 1578, he assembled 1,500 wrestlers from across Japan for a tournament held at his castle. Until then, there were no boundaries to the area in which Sumo matches were held. The space was previously designated by the people waiting for their turn to compete. Nobunga was the first person to draw circular boundaries on the ground for the first time. In the Edo period (1603-1867) several Daimyo (Feudal Lords) began sponsoring the strongest wrestlers. Those sponsored by the Daimyo got a big paycheck and Samurai status.

  • Thumbnail for Sumo legend
    Sumo legend

    The earliest written mention of Sumo is found in the Kojiki (Record of Ancient Matters), a book from the year 712, which is the oldest example of Japanese writing. The Kojiki relates a legend about how possession of the Japanese islands was determined by a Sumo match 2,500 years ago between the gods Takemikazuchi and Takeminakata. The two men grappled on the shores of Izumo along the Japan Sea coast until the latter finally lost. Thus control of the archipelago was ceded to the Japanese people led by Takemikazuchi, who is said to have established the imperial family from which the present emperor traces his ancestry. Thus Sumo from the start was different from most other sporting matches; each match a historical recreation.

  • Thumbnail for Yonkojun sports game
    Yonkojun sports game

    This is the great get together between the two colleges: Korea University and Yonsei University. This is a friendly rivalry involving cheering and sports. Seoul, South Korea.

  • Thumbnail for Yonkojun festivities
    Yonkojun festivities

    Korea University and Yonsei University annually celebrate a friendly rivalry. With the festivities of the once a year party called Yonkojun, students gather and mill throughout the streets to sing for their supper. All establishments from small bars to big franchises are fair game in the Halloweenesque act of cheering for free food and drink. Seoul, South Korea.